How to take the metal pin out



Your idea is the one I had next, William, but both of the types you recommended are not proper for application on steel. Both of them are soluble at heat, and dull quickly. Aluminum oxide would be the best choice here, unless speed could be kept quite low, then diamond would work reasonably well. Heat is going to be a problem, so this entire matter should be handled slowly, allowing plenty of time for it to dissipate.
Harold
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Buy a Dremel tool at your local DIY store and grind it away. Of course I have to ask if you have called Kohler and explained your need to disassemble and asked for guidance?
I'm curious about their customer support.
Wes
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Don't dip the door in the acid - doubt if you could buy that much if any. Mostly you can buy some paste and some wipes.
I'd do the central down. Mask off with wax or tape and work with paste.
It might be best to get it garnet blasted to frost.
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net TSRA, Life; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. http://lufkinced.com /
Nick wrote:

http://www.us.kohler.com/onlinecatalog/detail.jsp?from=thumb&frm=null&module=Glass+Showers+%26+Doors&item 995302&prod_nump2010-L&section=2&category
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snip-----

That's not likely to be a problem with common glass, which doesn't contain metals. I can see where lead crystal might be affected, however. The borosilicate glass used in labs, along with common household glass are not affected by HCl. I used the same 1 liter decanter for HCL almost the entire time (about 20 years) I refined precious metals and had no degradation of glass quality.
Harold
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I've seen pattens in glass what will only appear if you breathe on the glass - the vapor in your breath causes the image to appear.
Any clues on to the acid to use, and techniques to apply the acid?
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writes:

If you're asking me, Max, I have no clues. That one sounds pretty exotic.
-- Ed Huntress
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writes:

If dilute enough, and applied only for a short time, hydrofluoric acid will lightly enough etch glass so the pattern is only an area of increased porosity.
Hydrofluoric acid is the standard for glass etching of any depth.
About twenty years ago, I was given a bottle of Glenfiddich Special Reserve for Christmas. The bottle came in a (metal content!) metal cylinder, and wrapped in a large tissue with the Glenfiddich Stag emblem in line-contrast black.
Hmmmm.... (More Metal Content!) My guns were looking for a classier home, so I transferred the stag to a sheet of glass, along with the "Glenfiddich Special Reserve" banner around it, and etched it on the backside of the glass.
Then, of course (no metal here) built a new wooden gun cabinet around the glass.
Classy... I don't have one, but it looks like it belongs in an old Winsor manor's den.
LLoyd
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote in message writes:

Hmm. 'Sounds like a good reason to buy a Purdy shotgun and a couple of H&H rifles to me, to properly complete the decor. d8-)
-- Ed Huntress
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I suspect the peacock colors in leaded glass is from an HCL wash. Thanks Ed.
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net TSRA, Life; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. http://lufkinced.com /
Ed Huntress wrote:

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I wondered about those colors when I read about the iridescence that comes from HCL etching, but I didn't see anything on Google about it being used as a coloring method. Probably I wasn't asking Google the right questions.
-- Ed Huntress
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message

that usually comes from vapor deposits of stannous chloride applied to the slightly under molten temp glass at a certain point in the production of sheet glass.
there are other chemicals used in this too, but all applied to hot glass as a vapor, for example dichroic glass is 10-30 layers of vapor deposition of different kinds of metals in a vacuum chamber.
none of these processes is any type of etching with acids.
regards, charlie http://glassartists.org/chaniarts
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Aha. Thanks, Charlie.
-- Ed Huntress
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wrote:

You're thinking of hydrofluoric.
Harold
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