Inner Diameter of Hole Too Large for Press Fit

Hi. I have an aluminum piece with a hole. There was a tube pressed into
that hole, but I pressed it out and want to install a different tube. The
inner diameter of the hole is slightly larger than the new tube that I want
to press fit into the hole. The new tube can be inserted into the hole
without a press fit, but it does not rattle around. This is not a tight
enough fit. It has to be a press fit. I am hoping there is a tool to
reduce the inner diameter of the aluminum hole so that the new tube is a
tighter fit. From searching around, it seems that I may need a knurling
tool. I have a 20 ton shop press, and I am hoping to find something that I
can press through the hole to make it a smaller hole, causing a press fit
for the new tube and aluminum piece.
Does anyone have any suggestions on what to do?
Sorry to not list a real e-mail address, but it is to avoid spammers. It is
goteverwhatyouneed at yahoo dot com.
Thank you very much.
Reply to
JWho
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http://68.72.74.108/PRODUCTS/660.htm Tom
Reply to
Tom
Loctite 609...
Ned Simmons
Reply to
Ned Simmons
A knurling tool will not work if the assembly needs to be sealed. This is because of the way the knurling works. The metal is displaced from one area to another. The knurling tool for inside knurls looks like a screw. So part of the diameter will be smaller but the other parts will be bigger. This method may be OK for valve guides in engines but probably isn't any good for your application. Loctite makes products to glue cylindrical parts together. Done correctly the finished assembly will be as good or better than a press fit. Try a web search for the proper product and a local fastener supplier to buy it from. ERS
Reply to
Eric R Snow
Jwho
If you intend to slip the mating tube into the "too large' hole only once, and you dont want to invest in a knurler. you might try this crude method.
Punch the surface of the tube thats slightly too small with a center punch. Put as many punch marks as you feel necessary. But you must punch enough marks to make the tube a press fit. Get some Loctite intended for locking bearings into their sockets and apply to the punched surface. Slip the tubes together and wait for the Loctite to set.
Jerry
Reply to
Jerry Martes
Here are 2 more ideas:
Install the tube. Use a center punch on the plate holding the tube, punching a series of dents around the tube. This should swage the plate material tight to the tube. I would still add the Loctite.
Does the problem lend itself to installing the tube and driving a tapered pin/swage tool inside the pipe to swell it outward to the plate? This could perhaps be done to the tube before assembly, but maintaining tolerances would be tricky.
Perhaps a combination of both.
(top posted for your convenience) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net
Reply to
DanG
or Permatex 620 sleeve retainer.
Reply to
Steve R.
Here is one more idea. You can snug a hole by tapping a ball bearing that is larger than the hole at the mouth of the hole.
Another way is to drill and ream tapered holes around the diameter of the hole and to tap in taper pins to these holes. When reaming the holes with the tapered reamer, ream every other hole and then ream the remaining holes from the other side of the work piece.
Or perhaps an easier solution would be to make a tube with a larger outside diameter.
Reply to
Roger Shoaf
Hit the thing a couple of times with a big hammer.
John
Reply to
john
Why not expand the tube? Can you fit a #6 cap inside the tube?
Reply to
Nick Hull
knurling
Swage the end of the tube to a larger size to fit in the hole properly.
Reply to
Steve W.
What i have seen done is use a 100 degree punch and punch around the hole as many places as possible forcing material into the I.D
Reply to
Bob and Lori Holcomb
Hi. Thank you both for the suggestions. I am going to take some pictures of all the items and give some dimensions in a later post.
Thank you.
Reply to
JWho
Hi. Thank you for the suggestion. To help clarify my situation, I am going to take some pictures of all the items and give some dimensions in a later post.
Thank you.
Reply to
JWho
Hi. Thank you for the suggestion. To help clarify my situation, I am going to take some pictures of all the items and give some dimensions in a later post.
The fit doesn't have to be watertight, if that is what you were referring to.
I saw a bunch of knurl tools at Knurlkraft. They just looked like a little wheel with some grooves on the outside. Would that be the tool I need, if I go that direction?
Thank you.
Reply to
JWho
Hi. Thank you for the information. To help clarify everything, I am going to take some pictures of all the parts and give some dimensions.
I plan to assemble it only one time and never remove it again. The new tube is real hard steel, so I don't know if I can centerpunch it like that. Someone else might be able to, but probably not me. :-)
Thanks again.
Reply to
JWho
Hi. Thanks for the suggestions. Does swage mean similar to swell?? I don't know what a swage tool is, but I don't want to try to hammer anything into the junction.
I am going to take some pictures of all the parts and give some dimensions in a later post and maybe that will help to clarify everything.
Thanks again.
Reply to
JWho
Hi. Thank you for the suggestions. Due to the piece, I don't want to drill any holes into the piece.
I am going to take some pictures and get some measurements to make all this clearer. I am going to post again later with that.
Thank you.
Reply to
JWho
... and not get to use my new shop press? :-)
Reply to
JWho
Hi. The new tube is steel, and the piece with the hole is aluminum, so I thought it would be easier to make the hole smaller. Sorry to be ignorant, but I have no clue what a #6 cap is. The tubes are about 30mm or so in diameter. The inner diamater is around 10mm or so. I'll have to check that and report back.
I am going to take some pictures and some measurements of all the parts, then make a post later. That may help to further explain all this.
Thank you.
Reply to
JWho

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