is there a 1-ton pickup with a real PTO?

Having just sold my boom truck primarily for insurance reasons, I'm
now looking to buy a truck I can insure. Meaning, a 1-ton or less,
e.g. F350. I'm considering a hydraulic tiltback trailer, but I'm
wondering if I can get an F350 (or equivalent GMC or Dodge or whatever)
truck with a PTO. Not knowing where to ask such a question, I thought
I'd pose it to you guys, who seem to know everything.
Grant Erwin
Kirkland, Washington
Reply to
Grant Erwin
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You won't find any PTO covers on any of the 1 ton trucks of the past 20-30 years. Your best bet is to buy a pump with an electric clutch (the Surplus Center has them) and mount it on the engine running it with a belt. They have both V-belt and serpentine belt set-ups.
tim
Reply to
TSJABS
What gives you that idea?
The 6 speed tranny on the Superduty Fords have the PTO Plate on them. It takes a 6 bolt pto. Muncie and Dana have models that will fit.
Reply to
Bill Bright
In a 1994 Chevy K1500 1/2 ton pickup 4X4 they put a new venture 5 speed with two PTO covers.
-- RellikJM RellikJM AT Yahoo DOT Com Don't forget about my "FREE" EPROM programming ! Advice is only worth what you paid for it!
Reply to
RellikJM
Sure you will. My 2002 Dodge 1 ton has a NV 4500 5 speed with the standard set of two pto ports, you can get the NV 5600 6 speed and have the same thing. My 1990 1 ton with Getrag trans too, my 1983 F-350 with a T-19 4 speed also. The rig welders that work for me on occasion drive a motley collection of Dodge, Chevy and Ford 1 tons and yep, you guessed it, them too. F-450's and F-550's as well. I believe the new Allison auto trans in Chevy's as well. You really should crawl under there and take a look. You can also buy a kit that replaces the pto covers with two little sumps, that add additional oil capacity.
JTMcC.
Reply to
John T. McCracken
You've got that right. I've not seen many manual transmissions without a pto plate on them. I believe Ford still makes a automatic with a pto plate as well. Allison definitely makes them as well but many of them require a special pto. If you must have a automatic then look at the transfer case. Many of them have pto ports as well.
The best way to go if you have the room is a pto setup so that the hydraulic pump bolts straight to the pto. Much more reliable than running a pto shaft back to the pump.
It's getting to the point where there's not enough room under the hood to put a pump in anymore. I'm not fond of this setup anyway since the tank ends up so far from and often below the pump.
Actually for what he's doing he may be better off with a electric pump mounted on the trailer. Just be sure and run a big enough wire back to it.
Wayne Cook Shamrock, TX
Reply to
Wayne Cook
just curious if you can insure a military truck such as a M35A2. Those have PTO winches and are very real things.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus23445
Well, I'm not about to try. I got my butt singed off trying to buy a noncommercial policy for a IH Loadstar 1600 even though the sucker basically sits in my driveway. I lost that battle. Everyone says "We'll insure up to a one-ton" so that's what I'm going to get - with a stout trailer hitch of course.
Grant
Ignoramus23445 wrote:
Reply to
Grant Erwin
I have a 94 Chevy 3500 dually 1 ton with a 5 speed manual. The trans has a PTO cover on it. I put on a 10,000 lb Drawtite hitch, which was the largest 2 inch receiver hitch I could find. You can get up to 12K lb, but you have to go to either a 2.25 or 2.5 inch receiver, I forget which. The ball mounts tend to get expensive on the larger sizes since the things are solid steel. The 2 inch ones seem to run around 50 bucks.
I had an old F350 dually that could handle a 10ee in the bed with no problem, but the Chevy rides better and gets 17mpg to boot (it's a diesel - the Ford had a 450 and got around 6 on a good day)
A dually one ton is about the biggest non-commercial truck you can get. You can add a gooseneck hitch and haul just about anything you need all the way up to a backhoe.
Paul
Reply to
Paul Amaranth
I have a 40,000lb GVW 1951 OshKosh 4WD dump truck I had insured for a while. (I don't use it enough to afford to insure it anymore) Anyway, for years I had the same cost for insurance as a pickup. Don't think the guys at my insurance carrier then knew what they were insuring. :)
Personally I find this problem a real drag. I move a lot of stuff on a bumper trailer that would be a lot safer on a truck. I've seen usable straight trucks (old farm ones) go for less than $500. Most of what I move would be far safer on a truck, but the cost of insurance (even if you don't use it often) and licencing are so prohibitive people are cutting the cabs off old trucks and making them into more dangerous but cheaper to run trailers.
Dave
Reply to
David L Peterson
I have a couple of questions:
What does a PTO port on the transmission look like?
How do you connect to the port to transmit the power?
Thanks
Reply to
Dev Null
On the side there is a cover held on by 2 bolts. The cover is about the size of a tiny frying pan. If you take it off, then you can put in a PTO shaft. A PTO shaft commonly runs to a hydraulic pump which is bolted to your frame. It has 2 U-joints so the car can flex.
Grant
Dev Null wrote:
Reply to
Grant Erwin
What part of the world are you in that they use 2 bolts on a pto?
JTMcC.
The cover is
Reply to
John T. McCracken
Well, maybe it's 3 or even 4. Sorry!
John T. McCracken wrote:
Reply to
Grant Erwin
Try 6 on standard small PTO's (large trucks use 8 bolts) and you've got to get the a PTO adapter with the right gear on it to fit the transmission. The cover is a rectangular steel plate which is roughly 4x6" from memory. There's one bolt in the top and bottom with two on each side.
Most common is PTO's that have a shaft sticking out which you put a U-joint on then run with a shaft (and often other things) to the pump, winch, or what every you're running. Some PTO's can be gotten that allow direct bolt up of a hydraulic pump (highly recommended). Muncie makes a pretty nice and versatile pto which can be configured for this. The way things seem to be running with Chelsea pto's I'm starting to get worried about them. I've seen more of them in the field but when researching which one I needed for my truck I ran across that they've been sold again recently and finding info was a lot harder. It's proven much easier to find parts and info on Muncie pto's and I'm fairly impressed with the design.
Installation of a pto requires using shims to set the backlash on the gears. Sometimes a spacer plate is needed as well. Muncie has a good site which will print up a page telling what it available and needed for each model transmission.
Wayne Cook Shamrock, TX
Reply to
Wayne Cook
I was faced with the same fundamental problem, $1,000 per year insurance on an F700 I drove six times a year locally. I can get a 48' semi for 1/2 a day for $150. For all else, I bought a Chevy 2500HD and a 20' 3/4 tilt trailer rated for 12,000#. The 2500HD I have has the 6 liter gas and is rated for 10,600# towing. The 8 liter model is rated at 16,000#. I figure I'm good for the full trailer capacity on local hauls. This trailer, by Liberty, has 1/8" diamond plate floor, 5" angle frame, and tilts so low you can drive any forklift right on it. It has a hydraulic shock absorbing cylinder which can be put under power. I don't need to put it under power, it works slick as it is. Better than a rollback because it's much lower. What I do is bring my own forklift on my trailer, and have a semi meet me at the auction site. It was costing more to get a large rollback to put and take the forklift, than it cost for the semi. Using a smaller forklift, I can go pick up a Bridgeport and just drive on the the trailer, stop, and chain off. Paul
Reply to
6e70

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