knurl stainless steel



    I will once I tear open the baggie. I did take one shot of the baggie itself, with some of the parts visible in there, but I expect to open it up, spread them out in a nice array, and photograph plate and screws, followed by detail photos of the points and heads.
    But I'm keeping it sealed until I use it to convince my dentist that I no longer need to take aitibiotics prior to a tooth cleaning. (Apparently, embedded metal is considered a focus of blood-borne infections stirred up by the tooth cleaning process. :-)
    I'll be putting the photos of the screws in my web page about the arm experience rather than trying to e-mail photos to the world.
    The heads look like Torx (to be verified by test-fitting to existing drivers once the baggie is open). They appear to be a shape and size so they will mostly bury in the holes in the plate while allowing setting at various angles as needed. (Again, to be experimented with once the bag is open.

    Yep -- in a partially clear baggie, with a visible indicator strip which shows that it got hot enough for long enough to be safe to handle -- even if I had ebola. :-)
    At least my arm is getting easier to live with much more quickly than last time. No significant bone healing to do -- other than to fill the holes where the screws were -- and after a week I can do a lot of things which it took a couple of months or more (plus P.T.) to reach from the previous surgery.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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On Thu, 12 Nov 2015 18:08:23 +0000 (UTC), Cydrome Leader

As someone who has done plenty of production knurling I can tell you a little about knurling. When forming a knurl water based coolant usually works fine. For best results the coolant or oil used should be one that has high pressure additives. Especially if knurling tough materials like 316SS. Depending on the knurl type and the material it is possible to form knurls that are quite sharp. If cutting knurls are used then the oil or coolant chosen should be the same one chosen for regular machining. On a screw machine a neat oil or an oil with additives might be used more often than water soluble oil coolant. But in a lathe that runs many different types of work water soluble oil coolant would probably be used. Knurling is not as simple as it appears at first glance and the material being knurled has a lot to do with the type of knurl that will work best. Free machining brass is a material that would seem to be a good candidate for form knurling but it is actually better knurled with a cut type knurl. This is because it work hardens very fast and then starts to flake. On the other hand 304SS can usually be form knurled with excellent results. Eric
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