Labor Savin' update

Well , I got the winch mounted on the top beam of the jib crane , and added a 2 3/4" pulley for the cable above the beam for a little more
height . I've changed my mind about using the *battery I ordered , I'll be using the tractor battery for power . I did a test run a little while ago and unloading one load of wood from the yard trailer doesn't drain the battery enough to notice . Since I use the tractor to haul the wood out of the forest it gets recharged between uses with the winch . I considered adding a pulley and doubling the cable back to an anchor point on the top beam , but after today's test run I don't think that will be necessary . The loads ware way below the winch capacity , even for the biggest rounds I'll be handling . I noticed very little difference in cable speed between loaded and unloaded and the speed is just about right for this task . * A couple of years ago I was given a UPS that needed a new battery . Guess what ? The battery I ordered for the hoist is exactly the right size for the UPS ! I'll be hooking the UPS up to my computer surge protector and the telephone/modem/router surge protector . We get occasional flickers in the power line , this will eliminate those annoying delays waiting for the modem to reconnect . I'm a-comin' outta this one smellin' like a fresh-baked apple pie ! <smells much better IMO than a rose>
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Snag
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"Snag" wrote in message
* A couple of years ago I was given a UPS that needed a new battery . Guess what ? The battery I ordered for the hoist is exactly the right size for the UPS ! I'll be hooking the UPS up to my computer surge protector and the telephone/modem/router surge protector . We get occasional flickers in the power line , this will eliminate those annoying delays waiting for the modem to reconnect . I'm a-comin' outta this one smellin' like a fresh-baked apple pie ! <smells much better IMO than a rose>
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Snag
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On Thursday, August 20, 2020 at 8:57:31 PM UTC-4, Jim Wilkins wrote:

I have crowbarred a LOT of batteries from APC UPS boxes.
You have to wonder: 1) What's wrong with the charging circuit that the batteries respond so destructively? 2) Why don't they design these enclosures so the batteries don't get stuck inside?
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"rangerssuck" wrote in message

I have crowbarred a LOT of batteries from APC UPS boxes.
You have to wonder: 1) What's wrong with the charging circuit that the batteries respond so destructively? 2) Why don't they design these enclosures so the batteries don't get stuck inside?
=======================================================The batteries came out easily after I Googled the APC1400 instructions, which are to pry the top of the plastic front control panel off forward and unscrew the metal plate behind it.
FWIW, I've read that AGMs swell after one cell shorts and the others overcharge. The 12V 18A AGMs I buy used and keep as jumpstarter spares have never bulged from my intermittent recharging procedure but they do occasionally lose a cell to old age (5~8 years). The battery voltage appears normal during slow recharging but the current never tapers down below 0.01C at the recommended float voltage like a good AGM, and a load test afterwards quickly drops the battery to 10V. I use jumpstarters with Andersons as safely-packaged portable 12V DC power sources, like for my car freezer.
A few weeks ago the electrolyte level in my 2017 solar batteries was right where it was a year ago, touching the bottom of the filler well. Neither the APC nor my solar controllers, which are set to the same 13.6V non-bubbling float voltage, lowered the level at all. Measuring a clearance below the filler well such as the 1/8" that Trojan specifies is too fussy for me.
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rangerssuck wrote:

I've had to disassemble some UPS because of the swelling. You couldn't get anything between the battery and the struts of the frame. The old battery had swollen a half inch wider than the opening.

It's obvious, isn't it? You can't wait for a trickle charge for the battery, in case there is another outage . That requires a higher charging current. Add the high discharge current and you are abusing the batteries. A proper setup would use a much bigger battery, rated to charge and discharge at a higher rate than how you are using it. The telephone central offices float charged their batteries, and some battery banks at Central offices were in constant use for 25 years.
As the sealed UPS batteries age, the internal resistance goes up. That causes internal heating. When it gets bad enough, the boiling electrolyte cause the case to swell a little, each cycle until the user finally has it serviced. The same thing happened to the ole mounted UPS we had in Cable TV system. The cheap ass manager refused to replace bad batteries until they leaked, or they burnt up the inverter/charger boards. The few batteries he did buy weren't the right sealed, deep charge batteries, they were $29 car batteries from Kmart. Those lasted one or two short outages, instead of four years. These had a 60V, 15A square wave output that was similar to the pole mounted Constant Volt Transformer supplies that regulated the supply to the amplifier housings.
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"Michael_A_Terrell" wrote in message

It's obvious, isn't it? You can't wait for a trickle charge for the battery, in case there is another outage . That requires a higher charging current. Add the high discharge current and you are abusing the batteries. A proper setup would use a much bigger battery, rated to charge and discharge at a higher rate than how you are using it. The telephone central offices float charged their batteries, and some battery banks at Central offices were in constant use for 25 years.
As the sealed UPS batteries age, the internal resistance goes up. That causes internal heating. When it gets bad enough, the boiling electrolyte cause the case to swell a little, each cycle until the user finally has it serviced. The same thing happened to the ole mounted UPS we had in Cable TV system. The cheap ass manager refused to replace bad batteries until they leaked, or they burnt up the inverter/charger boards. The few batteries he did buy weren't the right sealed, deep charge batteries, they were $29 car batteries from Kmart. Those lasted one or two short outages, instead of four years. These had a 60V, 15A square wave output that was similar to the pole mounted Constant Volt Transformer supplies that regulated the supply to the amplifier housings.
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Jim Wilkins wrote:

Jim, your message was dimmed out and won't quote, since you didn't delete the two dashes, followed by a space at the bottom of my message and above the sigfile.
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"Michael_A_Terrell" wrote in message

Jim, your message was dimmed out and won't quote, since you didn't delete the two dashes, followed by a space at the bottom of my message and above the sigfile.
(-- ?) Never piss off an Engineer!
They don't get mad.
They don't get even.
They go for over unity! ;-)
===================================I wouldn't notice details like that because I use Windows 7 Live Mail which copies postings verbatim. That's why I add the separator. WLM wasn't the first newsreader I tried when I changed from XP to 7 last April, but it was the first I could properly configure for Eternal September's servers.
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On 23/8/20 10:41 pm, Jim Wilkins wrote:

Just because WLM doesn't obey the Internet standards is not reason you shouldn't assist it to.
--
Clifford Heath

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Jim Wilkins wrote:

I use Seamonky with Eternal September. Thunderbird works with it, as well.
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"Jim Wilkins" wrote in message

I too have been using wlm for years and putting up with the lack of "> " in quoted lines. Sometimes I'd top post, sometimes add a break line like your. After a particularly nasty netcop started harassing me for top posting I looked around and maybe a year ago I found a solution: http://www.dusko-lolic.from.hr/wlmquote/ I used it for this message. Only gotchas are that you have to add two nonblank lines at the top before hitting win-9, which then get deleted, and it puts a copy of your sig into the quoted material so you have to delete those lines. If I cared I'd download the uncompiled version and try to learn the scripting language, but I don't post that much these days. Anyway, just thought you might find it useful. Oh, I started with wlm 2011 because that's all there was when I built my pc, but I finally got tired of the bug that would occasionally unsubscribe me from all of my groups and looked around and found that Microsoft did one update, wlm 2012. I forget where I downloaded it from because of course win 7 is no longer supported, but google should find it for you. It has a bug or two as well, but they are different and have only affected me once or twice :-). Now if they would only put "select all" in the right click drop down menu life would be much better ...
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"Carl" wrote in message
I too have been using wlm for years and putting up with the lack of "> " in quoted lines. Sometimes I'd top post, sometimes add a break line like your. After a particularly nasty netcop started harassing me for top posting I looked around and maybe a year ago I found a solution: http://www.dusko-lolic.from.hr/wlmquote/ I used it for this message. Only gotchas are that you have to add two nonblank lines at the top before hitting win-9, which then get deleted, and it puts a copy of your sig into the quoted material so you have to delete those lines. If I cared I'd download the uncompiled version and try to learn the scripting language, but I don't post that much these days. Anyway, just thought you might find it useful. Oh, I started with wlm 2011 because that's all there was when I built my pc, but I finally got tired of the bug that would occasionally unsubscribe me from all of my groups and looked around and found that Microsoft did one update, wlm 2012. I forget where I downloaded it from because of course win 7 is no longer supported, but google should find it for you. It has a bug or two as well, but they are different and have only affected me once or twice :-). Now if they would only put "select all" in the right click drop down menu life would be much better ...
Regards, Carl Ijames
======================Thanks, I'll add that to my growing to-do list.
Recently I've replaced the failing 50-year-old shower drain pipes and faucet cartridges, lowered and repaired damage to the TV antenna, milled angled mortices in handrails for a neighbor's charity repair project, taken down the metal chimney to thoroughly clean and inspect it, spread topsoil on the yard, salvaged files from a crashed hard drive, checked and rewired the solar batteries, and last night machined a heatsink that screws (3/8-32) onto the F connector of a hot-running USB TV tuner on the laptop.
Today's projects are troubleshooting a Win 7 Media Center recording issue that may require reinstalling the OS or replacing the boot drive, and sharpening and using a custom tool to scrape the hard deposits out of the chimney sections. A rust-through on the car and oil leak on the truck are next.
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On 8/28/2020 6:15 AM, Jim Wilkins wrote:







If you're using round stovepipe , may I suggest you make a "chain flail" ? Mine's a 3" round disc with 4 short pieces of chain welded on , mounted on a length of 1/2" all-thread . The 8' all-thread I started with was cut into 3 32" pieces and coupled with nuts made of 3/4" hex stock . Spinning it too fast may have a detrimental effect on the stovepipe ... We were leaving Memphis on Sunday afternoon - until the lower ball joint on the left front wheel failed . Took all day Monday to replace it along with the upper ball joint , CV drive axle , and brake line hose in my son's front yard ... came home Tuesday and on Wednesday I replaced the lower ball joint on the other side . It goes in Tuesday morning for front end alignment . The Harley trike was a pleasant way to run for parts .
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"Snag" wrote in message
On 8/28/2020 6:15 AM, Jim Wilkins wrote: ...

If you're using round stovepipe , may I suggest you make a "chain flail" ? Mine's a 3" round disc with 4 short pieces of chain welded on , mounted on a length of 1/2" all-thread . The 8' all-thread I started with was cut into 3 32" pieces and coupled with nuts made of 3/4" hex stock . Spinning it too fast may have a detrimental effect on the stovepipe ... We were leaving Memphis on Sunday afternoon - until the lower ball joint on the left front wheel failed . Took all day Monday to replace it along with the upper ball joint , CV drive axle , and brake line hose in my son's front yard ... came home Tuesday and on Wednesday I replaced the lower ball joint on the other side . It goes in Tuesday morning for front end alignment . The Harley trike was a pleasant way to run for parts . Snag
===============================You can do a temporary DIY alignment to make a car drivable by painting a stripe around the center of the raised wheels and then holding a well-braced screwdriver in the stripe as you rotate the wheel to scribe a true-running line in the damp paint. Lower the car to weight the wheels, roll it a little to let them position themselves and measure the difference between the lines forward and aft. There's usually a toe-in or -out spec to account for drag or thrust.
I've helped my BIL clean his 1790 farm house chimney with tire chains spun by a drill and dragging a Christmas tree up and down from both ends.
My Class A metal chimney is set up to clean in a few minutes from the ground. The rain cap pivots on or off by tugging on a cord. It's a standard round commercial cap mounted on scissor-like pivot arms attached to a band clamp around the top of the chimney. I slide a ring of 1/4" hardware cloth into the cap to keep leaves out in fall and nesting birds out in spring. Everything is painted to blend into the background of tree branches.
The lower end of the outdoor chimney rests on a shelf that leaves space below for a rubber horse stall bucket* that the brush weight won't damage. A pipe mast above the roof end supports a boom, pulley and wire cable with a weighted shop-made nylon brush I can swing over the chimney and then run down and up it until flakes stops falling. Wire brushing removes very little more. I put knurled handles on the screws that retain the lower cleanout cap to make them easier to remove and install by feel with a cold bare hand.
The chimney passes out of the basement through an opening that was originally a window. I added a smaller window and an outside mirror that shows the top of the chimney so I can adjust the airtight stove's draft for no visible smoke, eye irritation or bad smell, and thus minimal creosote and likely complete and efficient combustion. That took a lot of instrumented experimenting and fine tuning of the heated secondary air that burns the smoke. Red oak has a nice perfumey smell when completely burned. https://www.dwyer-inst.com/Product/Pressure/DifferentialPressure/Gages/Series2000 https://brothers-bbq.com/bbq-tips/best-wood-types-for-smoking-meat/
Once the stove heats to the smoke-free condition it will hold its temperature pretty closely for about an hour, then begin to slowly cool when it could take more wood. The camera aimed at the chimney top and stove temperature monitor in the kitchen tell me when. There's another thermocouple meter in the bedroom that reminds me to add wood in the middle of very cold nights. The stove burns and heats all night, just not at full normal temperature after the first hour, but you wouldn't know that without measuring it. By then the wood is mostly charcoal so the stove doesn't smoke as it cools.
I couldn't find a nylon brush that wouldn't scratch the lining so I made one from a 1/8" steel rod bent double and twisted, then I forced the twist open with a pointed rod and inserted coarse string trimmer cords for bristles. These were cut to length by sliding the brush slowly into stovepipe to center it as I snipped off the protruding excess, leaving them slightly long for wear. The haul rope is braided cotton which is easy on the hands when I grab tight after letting the weight free-fall.
After 35 years the chimney and brush are still in good condition, checked yesterday. I brush the chimney weekly, mainly to start clean in case weather, illness or injury stops me.
* those indestructible farm buckets are good places to store and carry chain falls, and to keep the lower end of the hand chain out of the dirt. Metal buckets make a loud racket when the hand chain runs into them and plastic ones don't last long.
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"Michael_A_Terrell" wrote in message
rangerssuck wrote:

It's obvious, isn't it? You can't wait for a trickle charge for the battery, in case there is another outage . That requires a higher charging current. Add the high discharge current and you are abusing the batteries. A proper setup would use a much bigger battery, rated to charge and discharge at a higher rate than how you are using it. The telephone central offices float charged their batteries, and some battery banks at Central offices were in constant use for 25 years.
======================================When I was the Segway battery tech my boss was a former APC engineer who told me a lot about that business.
A UPS is a grudge purchase you hope you won't need, like insurance. As a result their prices and features are as minimal as possible, especially the low end consumer models. Design standards are quite different between consumer, industrial and military products, as you can see in IC data sheets. The heatsink may be just a block of aluminum whose thermal mass matches the energy it absorbs during one discharge of the internal battery, to avoid the cost of a fan. My Newpoint UPS shuts off after 30 minutes on battery, likely for the same reason. That's why they burn out if you attach a larger external battery and run them near full capacity.
An industrial UPS design like the APC 1400 provides fan cooling, a true sine output, user programmability and twice the load capacity for 10 times the price, $700 vs $70. Engineers don't like designing the cheapest possible products, they do it to keep their jobs, and the public usually can't judge quality and buys lowest price. The discontinued bulletproof Maytags that last 50+ years are a good example, another is that only a small percentage of Amazon reviewers can evaluate the good and bad points of the product.
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On 23/08/2020 12:58, Jim Wilkins wrote:




When I bought a low end APC UPS I wasn't so worried about the maximum run time on the battery so long as it more than covered the time for the UPS notice of power failure via the RS232 connection to allow my Linux box to shut down gracefully and preserve data, continuous running was
bothered to replace it as all the filing systems I have used in recent years were journalling and didn't get corrupted if the mains failed, well JFS did but it was new at the time, XFS seemed fine as proven and now using Ext4 with no problems. I had used XFS on a previous Linux distro but swapping to a newer one it wasn't an option so tried JFS but not for long.
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"David Billington" wrote in message
When I bought a low end APC UPS I wasn't so worried about the maximum run time on the battery so long as it more than covered the time for the UPS notice of power failure via the RS232 connection to allow my Linux box to shut down gracefully and preserve data, continuous running was not a concern. That APC UPS did fail when the battery died but I never bothered to replace it as all the filing systems I have used in recent years were journalling and didn't get corrupted if the mains failed, well JFS did but it was new at the time, XFS seemed fine as proven and now using Ext4 with no problems. I had used XFS on a previous Linux distro but swapping to a newer one it wasn't an option so tried JFS but not for long.
=========================================I use the true-sine APC 1400 to back up the refrigerator and freezer when a strong squall line (today) or ice storm passes. Area-wide power outages can last over a week here. https://www.newsweek.com/eversource-power-outage-map-new-england-connecticut-maine-massachusetts-rhode-island-1497732
https://www.newscentermaine.com/article/weather/tornado-warned-storm-caught-on-video-producing-waterspout-on-lake-winnipesaukee/97-9646d7db-0869-489e-ac50-05a3e9bb76c4
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_New_England_hurricanes
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On 24/08/2020 01:08, Jim Wilkins wrote:


I can see that would need a more serious UPS and battery store to keep going for that duration. In my location in the UK I think the longest outage I've experienced in the last 27 years has been about 1.5 hours and a couple of periods of low voltage around 165V instead of 230V - 240V which isn't suppose to happen but can but I know enough to turn the fridge off everything else worked fine. Is the outage duration down to ageing infrastructure or maybe a rural location? When I lived in the US outages were of short duration but I lived in fairly populated locations in New York state, Connecticut, and Kansas.
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"David Billington" wrote in message
I can see that would need a more serious UPS and battery store to keep going for that duration. In my location in the UK I think the longest outage I've experienced in the last 27 years has been about 1.5 hours and a couple of periods of low voltage around 165V instead of 230V - 240V which isn't suppose to happen but can but I know enough to turn the fridge off everything else worked fine. Is the outage duration down to ageing infrastructure or maybe a rural location? When I lived in the US outages were of short duration but I lived in fairly populated locations in New York state, Connecticut, and Kansas.
========================================I haven't seen data but I think a major contributor is large trees that fell on the lines, especially in rural and older, less tightly packed suburban areas. Since the downed power lines may still carry 20,000V we can't all just go out and clear them ourselves. We like our trees, and their shade on humid 35C summer days. https://www.theday.com/article/20190819/NWS01/190819410
The cost to remove trees from near roads and houses can be very high when it requires a $125,000 crane that can reach the top of a 30 meter tall tree on the far side of a house. I managed to split the bill with a neighbor when he wanted several removed, then sawed my three >20" diameter oaks into beams, lumber and firewood.
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On Mon, 24 Aug 2020 12:59:26 -0400

Call me cynical... but having to go without power for days at a time and the Power Company requesting a rate hike to fix it is very persuasive...
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI
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