Lapping rod ends

Does anyone know how to lap the end surface of a rod so that it is perfectly flat and normal to the rod axis?
I thought I had an article by Geometer on how to do this but I cannot locate
it. It is no longer available on Yahoo Hints & Tips. If anyone has this article 119/2961 please let me know.
Thanks, John.
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We used to lap the ends of laser rods with a collet chuck that grabbed the rod, which had a large flat face to keep it aligned on the lapping film. I guess the chuck face got lapped a bit along with the rod-end. I can envision a design to avoid that, but it makes the whole business much larger. - basically expand the face so that face can ride on a non-abrasive surface which is parallel to the surface with lapping film on it.
It would be pretty straightforward to make such a chuck on a lathe. I'm pretty sure they can be bought, too, since we did not make the one we used. It was 15 years or so ago, so I could not tell you who made it, offhand.
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That's not possible. Any technique you use to form the end of the rod will render it less than perfectly flat, and less than perfectly normal to the axis.
Jim
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John Wilson says...

perfectly
Hey Jim,
Wouldn't you say it's a matter of what you'd call *perfect*? Starrett has been doing it for years, lapping micrometer spindles and anvils. They can easily resolve .000050" in the hands of someone skilled, so they must be pretty close.
Harold
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Harold & Susan Vordos wrote:

Place I used to work at, Hemco Gage, had a Pratt & Whitney SuperMic. I lapped the ends quite often, to .000010 parallel, as indicated by the Mikrocator indicator and a class XXX gage pin.
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I can't believe no one has asked this yet.
What procedure and equipment did you use?
Adam Smith Midland, ON

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Now Harold, sure that's right.
He knows what he thinks, when he says 'perfect.' That may not be what I think of when I say the same word.
This is why tolerances are put on dimensions.
He didn't put any tolerances there, so I felt free to add in my own interpretation. "Perfect" means no deviation from the correct geometry, at all.
Imagine a machine tool, with absolutely *no* rust on it all....
:^)
Jim
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Harold & Susan Vordos says...

Now that you put it that way, I understand! <g>
H
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Harold & Susan Vordos says...

Now that you put it that way, I understand! <g>
H
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Thanks for the comments and I did receive a copy of Geometer's file. I shall be a little more careful of the use of 'perfect' in the future.
John.
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