Lathe chuck spindle attachment

They can be generic, but very unusual. When I bought my 10" SB new from SB in '81, it did not come installed. This is no simple
task. In the end, I got it right, but it was truly a pain. If you do not get the taper attachment as factory, you will be faced with a whole series of mods for the carriage, which are not trivial. Secondly, after using the taper attachment on the SB 10 without a differential crossfeed screw and using the SB 13 x 40 SB with a differential crossfeed, there is no comparison. Give me the differential variety any day, as it allows the user to dial in cuts with the crossfeed AND the compound in a conventional manner. Without the differential crossfeed, only the compound can be used as the cross feed is disabled, which is not convenient. Using the taper attachment on my big 18 x 54 Lodge & Shipley is even easier. It is also factory installed.When you need one, there is no substitute. I would not own a lathe without one. Steve

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Really? I thought a 13X40 would be much longer than 47". They do 12X26 at double the price but that one has issues, too...
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Michael Koblic,
Campbell River, BC
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Michael, I have done this many years ago and I am passing the lesson on to you. I learned the hard way. Most hobbyists must limit themselves to one lathe for space reasons as well as one milling machine. It is imperative to buy that lathe and that milling machine as capable as possible. Today I have many machines, but that is an unaffordable luxury for most. In my experience of almost 50 years, the size I use for 90%+ of all my lathe work is the 13 x 40. This size machine has the power and stiffness to easily use cutoff blades without experiencing chatter, smaller machines really suffer there. This size machine also has the stiffness to use carbide without difficulty, where as smaller machines favor HSS tooling because tool drag is much less. You will be tempted to buy Chinese, they are good value for money, but typically they are 9 speed machines or less and that is NOT enough. Never choose a machine that does not have spindle speeds below 90 RPM. Lower speeds are far more valuable than higher speeds. This is especially true if you should be fortunate enough to locate a gap bed machine. Although in my experience, I do not generally need that extra swing, but it does happen from time to time. Additionally, the 13 x 40 machine will be equipped with cooling and the very good machines may have a spindle clutch and brake, which is very handy when doing setups and threading operations. As far as the required footprint, if you can allocate a 6' x 2.5' space, you are golden. Steve

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Flanged spindles aren't all that bad, to be the one reason to choose a different lathe with a threaded spindle, unless the threaded feature was critically important.
Fabricating chuck adapter plates is just one of those things that lathe users do when required, for flanged or threaded spindles.
A chuck won't come unthreaded from a flange while running the lathe in reverse, but it happens with threaded spindles once in a while (usually only once to some operators).
Another collet option ocurred to me (I'm slow).. ER collets could be used if one were to make an adapter/collet chuck to mount to the spindle flange. The overall length of the ER adapter/chuck would subtract from the center-to-center spec of the lathe. The amount of the extention away from the spindle nose bearing would depend on the holder design and the length of the collets. The holder and ER collets would allow long stock to pass thru the headsock.
--
WB
.........


"Michael Koblic" < snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com> wrote in message
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Backplates are simply interchangeable flange mounts. Threads aren't superior, just easier to cut at home than tapers.

http://littlemachineshop.com/products/product_view.php?ProductID=2532&category=-421559299 Or center an ER extension chuck in the 4-jaw.
I wrote "John Locke's current incarnation on "Lost" is straight from Buffy" and then saw this: http://www.movieline.com/2010/02/buffy-lost-similarities.php?page=all
It's fair, Whedon lifted plot and character ideas freely and blatantly from Star Trek, X-Files, Kubrick and Alien(s), which he helped write. Don't tell the lawyers, I think Buffy was his version of Ellen Ripley, a character who well deserved extended development in a TV series. He swapped magic for the tech and demons for space aliens, but used them in all the same ways, including a self-aware creation like Moriarty, an ex-demon girl as clueless about humanity as Data, 3 goofy geeks (clone gunmen), and Quark as the high school principal. "Spike" in the article above is a vampire Alex from A Clockwork Orange.
jsw
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The LMS ER-32 collet chuck at $200 is a fairly expensive accessory for a 7x mini-lathe, especially when a collet set is somewhat costly. But it does include a wrench.
But a chuck like that would be a good project and a handy accessory for a lathe with a spindle flange.
The LMS chuck looks like it's aluminum, the weight shown is 2.43 lbs (although ya can never tell what given weighs are, actual part weight or shipping weight).
The lathe model that Michael referred to earlier, had a MT4 taper and a 1" bore (5" flange), whereas the 7x mini has a MT3 and a 3/4" bore (with a 3" flange).
There are MT3 shank to ER chucks, so maybe there are also MT4 to ER, but they wouldn't have the stock pass-thru capability.
I'm not familiar with ER series collet overall sizes or capacities, but I was looking at C3 collets a while ago, which can be used with a MT3 spindle taper by adding a fairly inexpensive (~$35) adapter (and fabricating a drawtube, or LMS sells drawtubes).
I suppose that if one were inclined, a MT3 to C3 adaper could be made from a large endmill holder (cut down, bore thru). The same plan could work for fabricating an ER chuck on a MT taper, maybe.
The 7x mini I bought a while ago, and the 9x20 I've had for several years, both have MT3 spindle tapers. I do have a 10-piece set of MT3 collets, but C3s are a self-releasing type, which I would prefer.
Your perception into details of shows is somewhat astounding to me. I don't watch many TV shows because there aren't many good ones. The last series that I really enjoyed was X-Files, and Lost intrigued me at first, but I haven't watched it since season 2. The creator of X-Files said his enjoyment of the old series Night Stalker, in part, led to the creation of X-Files.
--
WB
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"Jim Wilkins" < snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com> wrote in message
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I have a MT4 ER collet chuck for my lathe and a holder for my mill.
Pass through is limited to the vendor and strength. Neither one is a pass through, but I suspect the holder is stronger best.
Martin
Wild_Bill wrote:

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Get good 3 and 4 jaw chucks and use the lathe, collets are nice and convenient but not necessary.
...

Not mine so much, I read reviews partly to analyse and learn the writer's style. I used to work part-time on film and theatre crews and thus notice details of acting, directing, sets, props and lighting. Whedon's DVD commentaries are nearly a master class in the art of film making.
This is the stunt woman: http://www.sophiacrawford.com/sophia-crawford-bio.htm I suffered through a few minutes of Power Rangers to see their superhuman gymnastic abilities.
Whedon allowed the backstage crew to communicate with fans on the Internet as long as they didn't discuss plots, and the unaccustomed fame they received went to a few heads including hers and Jeff Pruitt's. OTOH the writers were fascinating and soon grabbed the fans' attention. http://www.whedon.info/Drew-Goddard-At-The-Bronze-Beta,415.html He's the grandson of the rocket Goddard and well educated in science, which he writes into "Lost". "Minions" are his fan base.
jsw
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<snip>

Great body mechanics.

That maybe but her replacement was not a patch on her.
BTW is this your IMDb entry?
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0929273 /
--
Michael Koblic,
Campbell River, BC
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Not me, by then I was building expensive toys for the Air Force to play with. I worked for a student filmmaker in the 60's and a USO and then community theatre group in the 70's, all part time. I ran the projector for the classes the filmmaker taught and learned a lot.
We had our own imitation of Warhol's "factory" in the off-campus hippie village for a while, but I got no nearer to the craziness than holding the lights during filming. The talented hotties have all the fun with each other, the crew only gets to watch. All this while studying for a Chemistry degree. The only course I couldn't pass was technical writing, which is why I practice here.
In addition to Joss Whedon I'd like to see Brian Fuller and Baz Luhrmann succeed with a mass audience. You'll never look at Michael from Lost the same way again after seeing how Luhrmann had him play Romeo's friend Mercutio IN DRAG. Don't watch it if guns offend you. The two families were like rival crime syndicates, better armed than Mad Max, and even Juliet packed a Walther.
jsw
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