Lathe chuck spindle attachment

I dwonloaded two manuals in addtion to the "manual" that came with the saw. Essentially the same item but differeing advice. Two had me put in "140 weight gear oil", one had me use grease.
Given the state this thing was out of the box I thought I better open up the gear box and change the oil anyway. The oil was relatively clean. Then I found that there is no such thing as "140 weight etc." In the end I gave it a common 80W-90. Worm gears are only GL2 classification and if the oil is good enough for everything else I am sure it will not kill the saw. In any case I could not see the saw starting up freely in my cold garage with 140 weight in it.
Nice. Mine is very basic. It does not even lock in the vertical position. Having said that the first two cuts (one before and one after I tweaked the guide bearings) were almost identical and within (eyeball!) 0.010" on a 1.25 round mild steel. I cannot see wanting more accuracy than that. In any case the accuracy will be limited by the vise which will need sorting out in good time.
Reply to
Michael Koblic
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I added extra holes to the fixed vise jaw to move it closer to the blade for sawing small pieces.
Thanks.
He can write and direct a scene that's a gem of perfection, with dialog and acting worthy of Tennessee Williams, but rarely can he extend it to the whole episode. He writes for literate theatre/film buffs who also understand science, and quite a bit of the humor goes over the heads of a mass audience, like " ..makes Godot seem punctual". I had to explain to the rest of the internet fans that the time-stopping experiment on "Angel" was a Bose-Einstein condensate.
For a while Fox here ran Buffy and MASH reruns back to back, making it easy to see how similar their best moments were, also that MASH was forgettably weak at times too.
John Locke's current incarnation on "Lost" is straight from Buffy, where the "First Evil", assumed but never stated to be the devil, can take the form of a dead person and tries to recruit followers or subvert opponents by telling them whatever they want to hear.
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Flanged spindles aren't all that bad, to be the one reason to choose a different lathe with a threaded spindle, unless the threaded feature was critically important.
Fabricating chuck adapter plates is just one of those things that lathe users do when required, for flanged or threaded spindles.
A chuck won't come unthreaded from a flange while running the lathe in reverse, but it happens with threaded spindles once in a while (usually only once to some operators).
Another collet option ocurred to me (I'm slow).. ER collets could be used if one were to make an adapter/collet chuck to mount to the spindle flange. The overall length of the ER adapter/chuck would subtract from the center-to-center spec of the lathe. The amount of the extention away from the spindle nose bearing would depend on the holder design and the length of the collets. The holder and ER collets would allow long stock to pass thru the headsock.
Reply to
Wild_Bill
Backplates are simply interchangeable flange mounts. Threads aren't superior, just easier to cut at home than tapers.
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center an ER extension chuck in the 4-jaw.
I wrote "John Locke's current incarnation on "Lost" is straight from Buffy" and then saw this:
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It's fair, Whedon lifted plot and character ideas freely and blatantly from Star Trek, X-Files, Kubrick and Alien(s), which he helped write. Don't tell the lawyers, I think Buffy was his version of Ellen Ripley, a character who well deserved extended development in a TV series. He swapped magic for the tech and demons for space aliens, but used them in all the same ways, including a self-aware creation like Moriarty, an ex-demon girl as clueless about humanity as Data, 3 goofy geeks (clone gunmen), and Quark as the high school principal. "Spike" in the article above is a vampire Alex from A Clockwork Orange.
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Also a jack screw might be in order. And maybe drill and tap the table to cut small flat pieces.
I suffered through the first series of Lost and doubt I shall ever see the rest of them.
Funny story how I came to watch Buffy: An ex-banger who now teaches self-defense mentioned he liked the Buffy series. I was intrigued why a person of his pedigree would like such a program. Turns out he really liked the English stunt girl who did SMG's work in the middle series (before she married the stunt coordinator). Indeed she was brilliant. In the process of watching it I realized that this was an extraordinarily well written and acted series and became an addict. Angel and Serenity followed. I am sorry they screwed around with the Serenity.
I hope he rebounds from the "Dollhouse". There is being intelligent and then there is being self-indulgent. Dushku did not help...
Reply to
Michael Koblic
The LMS ER-32 collet chuck at $200 is a fairly expensive accessory for a 7x mini-lathe, especially when a collet set is somewhat costly. But it does include a wrench.
But a chuck like that would be a good project and a handy accessory for a lathe with a spindle flange.
The LMS chuck looks like it's aluminum, the weight shown is 2.43 lbs (although ya can never tell what given weighs are, actual part weight or shipping weight).
The lathe model that Michael referred to earlier, had a MT4 taper and a 1" bore (5" flange), whereas the 7x mini has a MT3 and a 3/4" bore (with a 3" flange).
There are MT3 shank to ER chucks, so maybe there are also MT4 to ER, but they wouldn't have the stock pass-thru capability.
I'm not familiar with ER series collet overall sizes or capacities, but I was looking at C3 collets a while ago, which can be used with a MT3 spindle taper by adding a fairly inexpensive (~$35) adapter (and fabricating a drawtube, or LMS sells drawtubes).
I suppose that if one were inclined, a MT3 to C3 adaper could be made from a large endmill holder (cut down, bore thru). The same plan could work for fabricating an ER chuck on a MT taper, maybe.
The 7x mini I bought a while ago, and the 9x20 I've had for several years, both have MT3 spindle tapers. I do have a 10-piece set of MT3 collets, but C3s are a self-releasing type, which I would prefer.
Your perception into details of shows is somewhat astounding to me. I don't watch many TV shows because there aren't many good ones. The last series that I really enjoyed was X-Files, and Lost intrigued me at first, but I haven't watched it since season 2. The creator of X-Files said his enjoyment of the old series Night Stalker, in part, led to the creation of X-Files.
Reply to
Wild_Bill
I have a MT4 ER collet chuck for my lathe and a holder for my mill.
Pass through is limited to the vendor and strength. Neither one is a pass through, but I suspect the holder is stronger best.
Martin
Wild_Bill wrote:
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
Get good 3 and 4 jaw chucks and use the lathe, collets are nice and convenient but not necessary.
...
Not mine so much, I read reviews partly to analyse and learn the writer's style. I used to work part-time on film and theatre crews and thus notice details of acting, directing, sets, props and lighting. Whedon's DVD commentaries are nearly a master class in the art of film making.
This is the stunt woman:
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suffered through a few minutes of Power Rangers to see their superhuman gymnastic abilities.
Whedon allowed the backstage crew to communicate with fans on the Internet as long as they didn't discuss plots, and the unaccustomed fame they received went to a few heads including hers and Jeff Pruitt's. OTOH the writers were fascinating and soon grabbed the fans' attention.
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's the grandson of the rocket Goddard and well educated in science, which he writes into "Lost". "Minions" are his fan base.
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Great body mechanics.
That maybe but her replacement was not a patch on her.
BTW is this your IMDb entry?
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Reply to
Michael Koblic
Not me, by then I was building expensive toys for the Air Force to play with. I worked for a student filmmaker in the 60's and a USO and then community theatre group in the 70's, all part time. I ran the projector for the classes the filmmaker taught and learned a lot.
We had our own imitation of Warhol's "factory" in the off-campus hippie village for a while, but I got no nearer to the craziness than holding the lights during filming. The talented hotties have all the fun with each other, the crew only gets to watch. All this while studying for a Chemistry degree. The only course I couldn't pass was technical writing, which is why I practice here.
In addition to Joss Whedon I'd like to see Brian Fuller and Baz Luhrmann succeed with a mass audience. You'll never look at Michael from Lost the same way again after seeing how Luhrmann had him play Romeo's friend Mercutio IN DRAG. Don't watch it if guns offend you. The two families were like rival crime syndicates, better armed than Mad Max, and even Juliet packed a Walther.
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins

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