Lathe Tailstock help (advice) needed

Le Blonde 13" lathe approx. 1947 vintage.
The tailstock quill in this lathe is loose. I've been living with it for 15
years and now finally want to correct it or move on to a better lathe.
Even when fully clamped and only 2" extended you can observe the quill jiggling within the tailstock when trying to enlarge (drilling) a hole from 15/32 to 31/64 in brass.
The seller alerted me to this and told me the lathe was probably used for tapping purposes allowing the quill to slide back and forth while disconnected. Don't quite understand the procedure, but doesn't matter at this point.
My question: Is there an inexpensive fix for this, or should I simply sell the lathe with the proper disclosures.
Only other gripe is the 500 maximum rpm along with a little vibration in some of the headstock gear settings.
Any advice would be appreciated. I would probably be happier with a smaller lathe with higher speeds.
Ivan Vegvary
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I have a similar vintage leblond. The bore for the quil on mine is slit on the back side with a bolt to tighten the quill. You can lock it in place if needed or adjust the drag. My 10EE has same idea.
I take it you don't have this feature. Can you easily add it?
Of course you could bore it out, add a bushing and then bore again. I think you could put a boring bar in the spindle, the tailstock in front of the carriage and push the entire tailstock with it tightened to just slide.
Karl
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Karl, thanks for your reply. My lathe is identical. Clamping down on the slit on the rear of the quill no longer helps. Still play in the front-to-back direction. Ivan Vegvary
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Karl Townsend wrote:

That would be the plan. You could bore it and use a brass shim rolled into a tube.
Jon
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On Mon, 24 Jun 2013 23:32:42 -0700 (PDT), Ivan Vegvary

within the tailstock when trying to enlarge (drilling) a hole from 15/32 to 31/64 in brass.

tapping purposes allowing the quill to slide back and forth while disconnected. Don't quite understand the procedure, but doesn't matter at this point.

the easy way is Loctite Fixmaster. Depends on where the wear is. If its the quill..Fixmaster might do you a good job..if its the tailstock...sleeving might be better.
http://www.henkelna.com/us/content_data/192137_LT5338_Shaft_Repair_final.pdf
If you know anyone in a plating shop...you might have good luck having the quill copper plated thick..and then hard chromed.
Gunner
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Thanks Gunner, Lot's of reading, interesting pdf Ivan Vegvary
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On Tue, 25 Jun 2013 07:32:37 -0700 (PDT), Ivan Vegvary

Jerwelcomen.
Gunner
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children. Thus, for example, there is also the popular tactic of
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On 6/25/2013 5:45 AM, Gunner Asch wrote:

jiggling within the tailstock when trying to enlarge (drilling) a hole from 15/32 to 31/64 in brass.

tapping purposes allowing the quill to slide back and forth while disconnected. Don't quite understand the procedure, but doesn't matter at this point.

Oh MY, this is a VERY handy PDF! Thanks mucho!
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On Mon, 24 Jun 2013 23:32:42 -0700 (PDT), Ivan Vegvary

within the tailstock when trying to enlarge (drilling) a hole from 15/32 to 31/64 in brass.

tapping purposes allowing the quill to slide back and forth while disconnected. Don't quite understand the procedure, but doesn't matter at this point.

There's Moglice: http://www.moglice.com/index.php http://www.moglice.com/handbookpdfs/handbook.pdf
You'd rough bore the tailstock to make enough clearance for the Moglice, fixture the quill in its proper location, make dams as required to contain the goo, inject the Moglice of the proper viscosity, and let it set. The stuff cost $25 - $45 for a 50 - 100ml kit.
--
Ned Simmons

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wrote:

jiggling within the tailstock when trying to enlarge (drilling) a hole from 15/32 to 31/64 in brass.

tapping purposes allowing the quill to slide back and forth while disconnected. Don't quite understand the procedure, but doesn't matter at this point.

Is Moglice hard enough for that? Compression strength of epoxy (Moglice) typically is around 5,000 psi. Moglice claims 23,000 psi. I have no freaking idea how they make that claim, unless they have some magic filler that takes up all the load. And the side load on those quills can be pretty high, especially if some klutz let a chuck work lose while drilling or tapping, and bell-mouthing the bore of the tailstock.
Anyway, since it's a straight sleeving job on many lathes (I don't know the LeBlond), I'd press in a piece of brass tube and ream it to fit, after grininding the quill to make sure it's straight and uniform.
Or I'd try. Whether I'd succeed is another question. <g>
--
Ed Huntress

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On Tue, 25 Jun 2013 10:27:10 -0400, Ed Huntress

jiggling within the tailstock when trying to enlarge (drilling) a hole from 15/32 to 31/64 in brass.

tapping purposes allowing the quill to slide back and forth while disconnected. Don't quite understand the procedure, but doesn't matter at this point.

Though I can't vouch for the properties, Moglice is heavily filled. It can be used to rebuild feed nuts, which I imagine is a more demanding app than a tailstock quill. http://www.moglice.com/applications/MachineExamples.php?Which=ingersoll_quill_bore
I did the way bearings on the work drive for a deep hole drill a couple weeks ago. The work drive weighs 800 pounds, but the bearing pressure is not too high. I'll let you know in 10 years how it worked out. <g>
--
Ned Simmons

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wrote:

jiggling within the tailstock when trying to enlarge (drilling) a hole from 15/32 to 31/64 in brass.

tapping purposes allowing the quill to slide back and forth while disconnected. Don't quite understand the procedure, but doesn't matter at this point.

Looking at the material properties, it looks great for way bearing applications. Those are rarely very high specific loads.
But the load on a tailstock quill probably is a great deal higher. I've seen the mouth of a quill socket get wrecked by one mistake -- not mine, I'm happy to say, although it scared the heck out of me to be standing close while a big Jacobs chuck flew out on the floor. <g>
--
Ed Huntress

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On Tue, 25 Jun 2013 12:39:53 -0400, Ed Huntress

jiggling within the tailstock when trying to enlarge (drilling) a hole from 15/32 to 31/64 in brass.

tapping purposes allowing the quill to slide back and forth while disconnected. Don't quite understand the procedure, but doesn't matter at this point.

I can't think of any normal loads on the tailstock that would exceed perhaps a couple hundred psi on the tailstock bore of a typical lathe. That's an order of magnitude higher than the pressure on the Moglice I put on the gun drill drive, but approx 2 orders of magnitude less than the compressive strength claimed for Moglice.
Estimating the load on the tailstock by looking at the result of an accident seems a bit like deciding whether the body metal on your car is thick enough by running into a tree.
--
Ned Simmons

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...

I'm sure you're right for *most* operations. If it were true for all this lathe has seen, the tailstock wouldn't need a rebuild.
Maybe i just like what I know, but a rebore and sleeve seems easier anyway.
my 2 cents
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Thanks Ned, will look at your suggestions. Ivan Vegvary
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On 6/25/2013 9:30 AM, Ned Simmons wrote:

jiggling within the tailstock when trying to enlarge (drilling) a hole from 15/32 to 31/64 in brass.

tapping purposes allowing the quill to slide back and forth while disconnected. Don't quite understand the procedure, but doesn't matter at this point.

COOL STUFF! This thread has been the most valuable to me in months! I'll be using Moglice soon! Thanks!
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Ned Simmons wrote:

Ugh. Having popped a lathe saddle free off the bed after casting Moglice on the underside of the bed, I'd be afraid you would never get the ram out of the tailstock. If there was any wear in the middle of the ram that reduced the diameter even .001", you'd be completely hosed for sure. The biggest arbor press in the world wouldn't free that ram. If you go this route (and Moglice is REALLY great stuff!) make sure you use an extra, extra thick layer of mold release on the ram. Actually, what I'd recommend is to make a substitute ram plug that is a couple thousandths undersize, cast the Moglice and then line-bore the Moglice for alignment and fit to the ram. Then, you could establish near zero clearance, without the nightmare of getting the real ram stuck in there. The pseudo-ram could be any sort of mockup, maybe even rolled-up shim stock, that would make it real easy to peel it off the Moglice.
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Jon Elson wrote:

That would be on the underside of the SADDLE, of course!
Jon
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You're supposed to use a barrier; waxed-paper works pretty well from what I understand.
Here is a pretty nice paper although I would probably bronze sleeve, bore and hone if it were me.
http://igor.chudov.com/manuals/Moglice-Epoxy-Application-Handbook.pdfhttp://igor.chudov.com/manuals/Moglice-Epoxy-Application-Handbook.pdf
Bottom line is who cares if a drill wobbles--leave extra stock to compensate, bore a short while with a single point off of the compound and then follow ip with a reamer....or just bore the whole dam thing....if you're doing work between centers, lock the quill, it'll repeat just fine ...
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PrecisionmachinisT wrote:

I used the recommended spray-on waxy mold release agent sold by Devitt for use with Moglice, and put 3 layers on. It still stuck REAL hard, but then the Sheldon saddle is a huge piece with a lot of surface area contacting the bed.
Jon
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