Lettering on metal

This is an art type project. I have a 4" (1/4 inch thick) piece or art
metal that I cut in the shape or a Lauburu. This is the Basque national
symbol. Sort of a swastika but with rounded lobes instead of sharp right
angles.
Anyway, I need to put three initials on it, about 3/4 inch high. Stick
welding it on would be too crude, especially considering my lack of
technique. Stamping it would not work since the biggest stamp set I own is
3/8 inch high.
Here is one thought. Print the letters (fancy font) on paper, glue to metal
and coat the rest of the metal with some form of resist. Peel off paper and
either solder or melt lead onto the un-resistant lettered areas. When done
I could either brush it so the letters are bright, or, gild it with gold.
Need help with resist and flux to use.
Not at all married to the above technique. ANY OTHER IDEAS would be greatly
appreciated.
Thanks,
Ivan Vegvary
Reply to
Ivan Vegvary
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Take it to a trophy shop for suggestions and possible quote.
RLM
Reply to
RLM
For a mere three letters, I'd just buy suitable metal letters from a sign shop, epoxy them on and be done with it.
Reply to
Pete C.
As DIY option, laser print the letters onto a sheet of stick on mylar, apply to the item, cutout the letters with an exacto knife, and then sand/media blast through the mask.
Reply to
Pete C.
If you have a mill, some letters easily lend themselves to being milled. IVAN is a good example. ROBERT is a bad example.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus20845
What is the metal?
How prominent does the lettering need to be?
Reply to
Jon
Have your letters or symbol cut by someone with a CNC plasma or laser table, drill a hole though your piece and spotweld from the back or epoxy in place. I found this symbol online and digitized it and saved it as a .dxf file. If you need a copy let me know or I could cut it for you. Steve speterATwcta.net
Reply to
Up North
Cut the letters out of whatever metal and attach them with screws.
Pete Stanaitis -----------------
Ivan Vegvary wrote:
Reply to
spaco
Or, use the stencil as a mask and lightly sandblast.
Reply to
TheAndroid
Use stencil, brush-plate with metal of contrasting color.
Reply to
Don Foreman
Cut them by hand with engraver's tools. Three letters wouldn't be too bad. Use one of the typefaces made for engraving.
John Martin
Reply to
John Martin
I am not sure that you will be able to get the solder or lead into the spaces left by the peeled-ff letters accurately.
I have tried similar method when making sundials: I got a set of stick-on letters, stuck them on the face of the dial, sprayed the whole thing with paint and then peeled off the numbers. I then etched the whole thing with Ferric Chloride. The big problem was that whatever glue there is left behind from the stick-on letters it acts as an effective resist and screws up the results. Cleaning up the glue with acetone is difficult - sometimes you cannot see it, sometimes you remove the paint with the glue.
I then tried the opposite: Stick on the letters (the face is sanded to 400 grit first) and use them as a resist, etch away all the rest. This produces an interesting effect on steel. The letters are shiny and the rest looks sand-blasted. There are few issues with this which I am working on.
If you only have 3 letters to do it is not unreasonable to cut them out from whatever metal you choose and stick them on with JB Weld. This holds really well particularly if there is no structural load. I have learned to do this as heat from soldering/brazing/welding has a rather unpredictable effect on the final appearance of the piece.
Hope this helps,
Reply to
Michael Koblic
I'll go look for letters. This could work. Of course, for a mere three letters, I could also cut them out of thing metal sheet, be it copper, brass or stainless. I have a die filer and could file to shape.
Thanks Pete,
Reply to
Ivan Vegvary
I will definitely experiment with media blasting. Obviously, on a sample piece. I wonder how much contrast I could achieve?
Thanks again Pete!
Ivan
Reply to
Ivan Vegvary
Iggy, I always wondered how much dexterity it would take on a mill (I do have one) to slowly operate both handwheels and do, say for example, a letter "O". This is where CNC would be wonderful! I will experiment.
Thanks Iggy
Ivan Vegvary
Reply to
Ivan Vegvary
Thanks speter! I already made a dxf. file of this over a year ago. I already made one out of sheet metal, 2 feet across and 3-4 inches thick. I made two sets of 'blades' two feet across, distressed and gave them a slight twist on an english wheel, positioned them opposite each other and welded on 'edging', 3-4 inches thick. This became the main graphic on a decorative iron gate for a friend. I am now making a latch assembly and the smaller Lauburu's in questions will become the doornobs.
I will try and see how much somebody with a CNC would charge to cut the letters.
Thanks speter,
Ivan Vegvary
Reply to
Ivan Vegvary
Probably the most practical and artsy idea.
Thanks Pete
Ivan Vegvary
Reply to
Ivan Vegvary
I'm playing with sandblasting to see what contrast I can achieve.
Thanks TheAndroid
Reply to
Ivan Vegvary
John, are you suggesting that the metal engraving field has special typefaces? Didn't know.
Can I make my own engraving tools out of HSP? I do have some pieces that are way too big to ever become a lathe tool for my size lathe.
Thanks John,
Ivan Vegvary
Reply to
Ivan Vegvary
What if I tried just the opposite. Glue on a mask (after all this is only 4± inches) wherein the three initials would be holes within the mask. Holes would not have any glue or other stuff on them. Would that allow me to add flux and then solder?
I will be trying to cut the letters from brass.
Thanks Michael, good ideas.
Ivan Vegvary
Reply to
Ivan Vegvary

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