Many Sketchup users on this newsgroup?

There has been a really long thread on Google's Sketchup CAD package for
woodworkers on rec.woodworking lately. I had tried an earlier version
of it. You got 8 hours of "design time" for free with the download.
Although the tutorial was pretty neat, once I tried to actually do a
whole drawing, it appeared that I'd have to do all (or most all) the
rote learning that I had to do with my Turbocad to get moderately
proficient. ("Rote learning" means learning dozens or hundreds of
commands and then remembering where they hide).
As this thread went on, people would tell how they had had trouble
getting it to do this or that, and someone would come back and tell them
what commands could be used, or what workaround to follow.
So, I abandoned the idea of learning a new system.
Any thoughts?
Pete Stanaitis
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Reply to
spaco
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spaco fired this volley in news:srOdnRwv7uNI0l_UnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@bright.net:
Pete, I use Sketchup for developing solid models (mostly architecture) of pyrotechnic shoot sites, for use in the fireworks simulator package "ShowSim 3D (Passfire labs)".
Sketchup is perverse, difficult to learn, and always a little hard to navigate in, even when you've pretty much conquered the learning curve. The "forced" (and not over-rideable) snap functions are the most disconcerting and confusing for a new user.
However, it's free in a version capable enough for most folks' work, it's updated frequently, it works, the .skp files are rapidly becoming readable by other 3D CAD systems, and you can turn out some pretty nice work with it.
It lacks the functions to make convincing organic shapes with any sort of ease or grace. But even some high-end commercial packages suffer in that respect. Rhino, which I love, can't. Alibre, which I hate, can.
All in all, I'd say Sketchup is a pretty good deal. A functional 3D drawing program that can handle photo-texturing, and for free, looks like a winner.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
_UnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@bright.net:
I'm taking a course on it at a local community college; it's really a great tool. It does take a lot of time learning/playing around with but for free it's the ticket. I bought the book "Sketchup for Dummies" and that helps walking you through it.
Reply to
jimbobmitchell
There is a learning curve, but it's pretty easy to get going for simple shapes, as encountered drawing, say, a shed. It's the more intricate mechanical things that often leave you scratching your head. As you learn those few methodologies for things like solids of rotation, etc., though, everything picks up speed pretty well.
I found the tips on r.w to be very useful for some of those "niche" methodologies. One of the articles pointed to a magazine editor's sketchup tips for making complex shapes, like bent and tapered chairlegs and curved back slats. A few little things like turning round sections to line up vertices when they intersect to get cleaner joints, things like that.
I find it easier to use than Acad 14, Origin3D, and likely several others that I have tried and set aside over the years. I haven't had this much fun with a new CAD program since I got to use one of the dedicated CATIA workstations in college...
--Glenn Lyford
Reply to
Glenn Lyford
Any Cad program has a fairly steep learning curve-especially seems so if you believe that mastering one should give you the working knowledge to pick up another one, and just go to work.You don't believe that, do you? JR Dweller in the cellar
spaco wrote:
Reply to
JR North
We found the video tutorials really useful. My wife watched those and was designing a pretty ornate staircase in an hour or so.
spaco wrote:
Reply to
RB
I believe you, JR.
The time I spent with 2D Generic CADD and Visual CADD was paid back handsomely as I learned Rhino3D. A ton of that early knowledge transferred quickly and easily.
--Winston
Reply to
Winston
Slightly off-topic, but how do you like Rhino3D?
Reply to
Edward A. Falk
Unless they've changed something recently, it's now free for the basic version. The paid version gives you more output formats and a sculpted surface design function that the free version doesn't have.
I found it extremely easy to use, and the learning curve wasn't nearly as steep as the other cad programs I've used. I've designed a lot of things with it and never missed the features in the advanced version.
I wouldn't really call it a true cad package though. There's a reason why it's called Sketchup and not CADup.
Reply to
Edward A. Falk
snipped-for-privacy@green.rahul.net (Edward A. Falk) fired this volley in news:gq63k9$fkv$ snipped-for-privacy@blue.rahul.net:
Yep, but it's quick and easy to learn, once you get past some of the perverse features (like that "can't turn it off" snap feature).
I learned Rhino3D also, and love it.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
I don't *like* Rhino much at all. I *love* Rhino.
It's logical and linear. It's way more intuitive than many (Cough Autodesk Cough) programs. Imports and exports to many different file formats.
I can still not get used to the uncanny user friendliness and usability of Rhino3D. Whatever questions I have are already answered in the free (self-paced video!) training materials
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...or via other users.
Export to a decent ray tracer and you can get some stunning images:
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DANGER! Do not download the free evaluation version and explore it. It will rearrange your priorities.
It's right here:
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--Winston
Reply to
Winston

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