Maybe Not Your Thing

This question may not be for this ng, but I'd like to try anyway,
please. I just built a tabletop for my old bench model Sears drill
press. It was a lot of work (featured in current issue of Shopnotes)and
when I got through it, I discovered the crank handle is in the way of
it. I know they make all kinds of foldable handles, but a better fix
would be to extend the 9/16 round stock that is between the worm gear
and the handle. Is there something that would do that?
Well, I warned you :-) TIA
Reply to
LDR
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Hey LDR,
Well, I hunted up the Shopnotes project
and it sure looks like a good idea for all of us.
Can you remove the crank handle and place a suitably drilled out "nut" to replace the crank, then drive the nut with a socket on a cheap ratchet. That way it wouldn't have to make a full swing
It doesn't describe the final assembly, but is there any way to "raise" the new work surface some reasonable amount above the original table to accommodate the crank without banging your knuckles? That would leave the crank positioned as it was designed.
If not, you can probably make an extension using a piece of pipe of proper dimension to fit where the crank does now, and in the other end of the pipe put a pin the same size as the crank-hole, and then create a support, fastened to the bottom and at the end of the new table-top, to hold the "pipe".
Much more work, and metalworking to boot, but a better method of course would be to get a pair of 90 degree bevel gears, and do something similar to the above but instead brought forward to near the front of the EXISTING (original) table where it would be most desirable to have this control. Somewhat similar to your table-saw blade height adjustment handle.
One of my drill presses is very very similar to the one shown in the Shopnotes. On mine the table itself will also "tip", so there is no way to fasten a support to the table front edge. I think I could add a piece of heavy angle iron to the mount clamp on the opposite side to the crank, and bring the angle forward to support the "bevel gear" idea.
Another good idea, especially now that you will have the additional weight, is to provide a counterbalance.
Good luck. Take care.
Brian Lawson, Bothwell, Ontario.
Reply to
Brian Lawson
snip)
Hi Brian, You redeemed the honor of this newsgroup, thanks :-) Actually, I did think of the ratchet wrench but dismissed it because I feared deforming the shaft either with epoxy or weld, and I wasn't sure a nut would stick with a press fit. However, I think I might give this idea a try. I also thought of either electrical or plumbing nipples to bridge the shaft and extension. The bevel gear idea is intriguing and really cleaver. The problem is I have given this project more time than I will ever admit to; time to move on.
On the other hand, while the problem may not merit this intensive attention, it is fun and does serve to remind us how mortal and trivial our lives are, he said, kidding again.
Thanks again, Brian. Larry
Reply to
LDR
Might you be able to drill a nut and finish bore to a light press fit, then drill across two flats and set a roll pin?
Reply to
John Husvar
Wow, John, thanks. Larry
Reply to
LDR
You can buy a shaft coupling designed to join two shafts, and use it with a short piece of round stock. The coupling is no more than a piece of round bored to the right diameter, with setscrews to lock on each shaft.
There are also shaft adapters, with a bored female end and a turned male end, but those are typically different sizes - and you want the same female and male sizes. McMaster Carr, among others, sell them - but you won't like the price.
Unfortunately, 9/16" is an odd size for these items. You'll find them in 1/2", and 5/8", but you'll have to do some hunting to find 9/16". You could, of course, bore or drill out a 1/2" piece - no great accuracy needed for your application.
John Martin
Reply to
John Martin
Thanks, John. This was my original idea, although crudely; I was thinking of plumbing or emt couplers. Anyway, where would I buy these couplers locally? Is there something like a machinist jobber. I've already ruled out Ace Hardware. (I'm in Portland, Or.)
Reply to
LDR
I'm outside Portland, Maine, so I can't be much help on local sources. A large hardware store should have them in the hardware box assortments. McMaster Carr is a good mail order source. But, as mentioned, they generally skip from 1/2" to 5/8".
John Martin
Reply to
John Martin

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