Mounting electrical box to lally column?

Larry Jaques fired this volley in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
Larry, Per this in the OP: "...steel lally
I'm just guessing plain ol' 6011 ought to work fine .
(I'd still Hilti 'em in)
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
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JB Weld of course!
Didnt they teach you anything?
Whenever a Liberal utters the term "Common Sense approach"....grab your wallet, your ass, and your guns because the sombitch is about to do something damned nasty to all three of them.
Reply to
Gunner Asch
Isnt it amazing how some people just never bother reading ALL the words?
Gunner, who occasionally does the same. Whenever a Liberal utters the term "Common Sense approach"....grab your wallet, your ass, and your guns because the sombitch is about to do something damned nasty to all three of them.
Reply to
Gunner Asch
=A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 Dan
=A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 Dan
Update on my mounting electrical boxs to concrete filled steel lally columns: boxes were mounted using #10 x 0.5" drill-tip screws. The first batch I drilled the hole through the steel with the drill tip portion of the screw. I then chipped away a little of the concrete fill with a hammer and nail. Next I ground the drill tip off the screw with a bench grinder, finally I mounted the box with the "sawed off" screw. This was a bit tedious, but still didn't take much time.
The second batch I just leaned into the drill-tip screw and mounted the box in one shot. Some of these went in a little crooked, but will hold the box on just fine.
I guess my summary would be: if you are not bothered by the screws not going in perfectly normal to the back of the box, then to just bear down with the drill tips and go to town. If you are a perfectionist, you may want to go with the drill, chip, grind, mount program described above. I promised drop box photos, but it really is not that exciting and my pics didnt' come out very well.
Thanks for the help, Andy
Reply to
andy
Try two (2) Walker 35337 Hardware Clamps, available at auto-parts stores. These are 3-1/2" diameter muffler clamps, with heavy-gauge steel "saddles" and 3/8" U-bolts. Drill matching holes through the back of the box and the saddles of the clamps, then attach toe box to the saddles with machine screws and nuts.
Reply to
Ray in NH
Try two (2) Walker 35337 Hardware Clamps, available at auto-parts stores. These are 3-1/2" diameter muffler clamps, with heavy-gauge steel "saddles" and 3/8" U-bolts. Drill matching holes through the back of the box and the saddles of the clamps, then attach toe box to the saddles with machine screws and nuts.
Reply to
Ray in NH
You replied to a 12 year old post.
For context, polytechforum.com is a crap web portal to Usenet. Even Google groups works better.
Reply to
Michael Terrell
You replied to a 12 year old post.
For context, polytechforum.com is a crap web portal to Usenet. Even Google groups works better. ----------------------
Nevertheless muffler clamps are very useful to attach things to round tubes. I have a steel shelf rack braced to a lally column with a muffler clamp and 3/8-16 threaded rod, and I used them to temporarily attach boat winches to the legs of tripods to hoist the 200 Lb gantry track into position overhead. For that I bought 1/4" larger clamps and padded under them with strips of 1/8" steel to avoid denting and weakening the legs. So far the ones I bought all have had inch-sized threads.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
And muffler clamps are cheap. I tend towards making a purpose built round clamp/mount with one or two bolts (depending on application) out of aluminum for jobs like this, but I recognize that not everybody can do that or has piles of failed mold projects laying on the scrap cart that they can salvage for the purpose. A muffler clamp the right size can be implemented in mere minutes. Well... not counting the time to go to the store and buy one, which could take longer than making something in my shop.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
And muffler clamps are cheap. I tend towards making a purpose built round clamp/mount with one or two bolts (depending on application) out of aluminum for jobs like this, but I recognize that not everybody can do that or has piles of failed mold projects laying on the scrap cart that they can salvage for the purpose. A muffler clamp the right size can be implemented in mere minutes. Well... not counting the time to go to the store and buy one, which could take longer than making something in my shop.
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I watch for common items that can be misused to solve unexpected design problems quickly, if not permanently. For instance EMT has the ID of Sch 40 pipe sizes while chain link fence posts and tubing has pipe OD. Some sizes of EMT telescope into fence tubing.
The rubber bulb from a $5 siphon hose is part of the gas tank pressurizer I made to prime the carbs of small engines that I ran dry before storing.
I do like you and machine clamps for permanent outdoor use from scrap aluminum. In the 80's I traded something I couldn't use for 60 Lbs of bar stock ends from a scrap dealer and haven't consumed more than half of them yet. One such custom clamp supports the top end swivel ring for my rotating antenna's guy lines.
I don't have CNC (or a DRO) and need to cut the round opening with a boring head, so for me a trip to the store may be quicker.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
My last two orders of bar stock were over 500 lbs each. Not big as orders go, but decent size orders for me. Some days I do miss when a haul like yours felt like a real score. There is a a certain inherent appeal to scoring some stock you can just use for whatever you need it for isn't there.
I think with a more basic shop I might make a clamp like that mostly on the lathe. It could be done all on the lathe, but its easier I think to drill for the clamping bolts on the mill or even on a drill press.
If I ever have time to do any foundry work I've got lots of little melty bits and a little alloying bits metal to mix in to make it pour better.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
I didn't say they were bad. I was pointing out that the OP likely wasn't waiting 12 years for an answer. se see replies to old post on other newsgroup from this same web portal, and they are mostly to ten year or older messages.
Reply to
Michael Terrell
I think with a more basic shop I might make a clamp like that mostly on the lathe. It could be done all on the lathe, but its easier I think to drill for the clamping bolts on the mill or even on a drill press.
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I would too, if my lathe's tailstock was in good enough condition to drive a hole saw to rough out the opening (and save the plug). The trade school kids used its spindle as an anvil horn. The dealer swapped in another old spindle but it's not perfect either.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Sounds like maybe a sleeve job would be a good project for that tailstock.
While not ideal you could trepan out the slug if you are that gungho to save it.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
Sounds like maybe a sleeve job would be a good project for that tailstock.
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That's my plan, if the lathe ever rises high enough on the to-do list. What would you sleeve it with?
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
This gives you one person's approach used by someone with a Harrison M300
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Thanks, that's pretty much what I had in mind. The first step might be fitting a narrow ring of drill rod steel into the mouth of the opening, and if it's not good enough reboring the entire hole.
Most of my work is short, held in collets or the 6-jaw, and the tailstock only drills a pilot hole that I then bore straight, concentric and to a running or press fit with another part.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
I guess that would depend really. I think most tailstocks are just cast iron, but I'm not sure I would feel very comfortable pressing in a cast iron sleeve in cast iron. Maybe some sort of bronze bushing material. I've used hardened straight shank collet chucks spinning in oilite bronze bushings before. I don't know what the longevity would be. When I wear one out I'll let you know. I don't think the moving wear would be significant with a material like that in that application. The only issue might be side load forces. Since its full supported if done right... Heck I don't know Jim. I'm making this up as I go along. LOL.
I'd probably spend more time stressing over getting the size right and on center. Drill fast, bore straight, ream to size except a reamer that size might cost as much as a whole-nuther tail stock, and recently I've found even name brand reamers vary a little more than I might like.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
Maybe keep an eye on ebay for a spare tailstock if the lathe is common, that's what I did with my M300 as I wanted one to convert to a lever tailstock as I do jobs that require deep peck drilling or drilling of multiple items and the screw tailstock was getting tedious with all the winding and unwinding. One eventually came up at an acceptable price so I bought it, turns out I knew the guy as he was a local engine machinist I had used in the past. He had been unfortunate when moving the lathe
pushed it fell on its front and wrote the lathe off, he sold all the salvageable parts on ebay to my benefit with the tailstock.
Reply to
David Billington

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