Residential power wiring: mounting electrical box outside?

Need to put an alarm buzzer (outside rated) on an external stucco wall. The buzzer has a 3/4 opening on the back of the 4x4 cast housing for a standard
conduit / flex fitting or strain wire clamp / bushing.
Have outdoor (NEMA 3, I think) 6x6x4 box.
Buzzer needs to face away from stucco wall.
So, how best to mount these? If I use NEMA box, cover is on face (away from wall), and I don't think you can mount anything on a cover (inspector might not like that : -). Any other surface faces the buzzer in a direction other than away from the wall.
If I mount the buzzer directly on the wall, this puts the 3/4 hole against the wall. Is it acceptable to put conduit or flex through the wall directly to the back of the buzzer?
Other orientations?
Suggestions welcome.
Thanks,
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On Thu, 14 Oct 2004 15:24:17 -0700, DaveC put forth the notion that...

Sure. As long as it's a weatherproof box, and the buzzer can be removed from the front to allow access to the splices.
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Checkmate

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On Fri, 15 Oct 2004 10:46:28 -0700, Checkmate wrote

Yes, it's a weatherproof box (cast housing; o-ring between buzzer cover/mechanism and box), outdoor rated, so the label says...
My question is more about how to get connections from within the stucco wall into the buzzer box. 3/4 hole in the back of the box accepts standard connection. Since this is at the wall/box interface, possibility of water intrusion exists (no matter how well you seal it). What is best to use here? Is romex with screw clamp sufficient? Armor cable? Waterproof?
Thanks,
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On Sat, 16 Oct 2004 09:39:16 -0700, DaveC put forth the notion that...

I've done similar installations where I had a 4S box on the inside of the wall, and a nipple through the wall to the outside box. If you're not going to have anything surface mounted on the inside of the building, you can still use flex or Romex (depending on local codes) and terminate it on the back side of the box with an approved connector. When you screw the box to the wall, slobber some silicone behind it and you'll be fine.
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Why not? they see flood lights and motion detectors in 3R covers every day. Just be sure to get one with a 3/4" threaded entry. Then you just use a close nipple from the electrical department. (plumbing pipe is not buffed out)
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On Thu, 14 Oct 2004 17:16:54 -0700, Greg wrote

The 3R box I have has no hole. Planned on making my own hole (not threaded). Buzzer has 3/4 hole on back (not threaded). Is it the *threaded* hole that makes this OK?

Can't I just use an electrical close nipple and nut between the two non-threaded 3/4-inch holes? Probably lots of caulk / sealer, too.
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If you are going to do something like this I would suggest securing the buzzer directly to the cover and just using a bushing. If this is just a flat cover, the threads on a bushing should be long enough to go through the cover and still have plenty to get into the buzzer entry threads. I would still use some screws to hold the buzzer to the cover.
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On Thu, 14 Oct 2004 20:19:13 -0700, Greg wrote

buzzer
So you would recommend using the NEMA 3 box and not directly mounting the buzzer to the wall?
Can I run conduit or flex or romex directly into the back of the NEMA box from inside the stucco wall? As someone else suggested, using lots of caulk or other sealant between the box and the wall...
Thanks,
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What does the manufacturer suggest?
Maybe I don't understand exactly what you have. If the leads come out of the buzzer you need a place to splice them. I assumed that was why you have a box there.

It happens all the time.
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On Thu, 14 Oct 2004 22:42:35 -0700, Greg wrote

Buzzer was old installation, which I am re-configuring (installing new alarm; buzzer was part of old alarm). Don't know mfgr...

Buzzer consists of its own cast box (approx 4x4) w/ 3/4 hole in the back, and cover. Cover consists of square buzzer mechanism ( grille, diaphragm, electro-mech buzzer ), with pigtails. Splice can be made within the buzzer's cast box.

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DaveC writes:

Soffit?
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