New 6" wire wheels

OK so what brand of wire wheel do you like and has held up to hard use without shedding every wire before they are really worn?
Looking for a pair, 6" diameter 1" face. Mostly for rust and scale removal. I was given a couple of the current B&D consumer wheels (think they were from Lowes) Supposedly plated steel wire. One is so out of balance the grinder wants to walk off the mount. The other one must be to buff your finger nails. The wire is JUNK and sheds if you even look at it crooked!
--
Steve W.

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On 6/20/2015 9:50 AM, Gunner Asch wrote:

But they are in Canada now. I'd buy Osborn or Weiler. I'm not sure where to get them except at a welder's supply.
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On 6/20/2015 5:07 PM, Gunner Asch wrote:

I'll e-mail you the story, my NG provider won't let me post that many lines.
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wrote:

CC that to me, too, please.
This just in via email, and they're geared toward you, Tawm:
AMAZING, SIMPLE HOME REMEDIES:
1. AVOID CUTTING YOURSELF WHEN SLICING VEGETABLES BY GETTING SOMEONE ELSE TO HOLD THE VEGETABLES WHILE YOU CHOP.
2. AVOID ARGUMENTS WITH THE FEMALES ABOUT LIFTING THE TOILET SEAT BY USING THE SINK.
3. FOR HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE SUFFERERS ~ SIMPLY CUT YOURSELF AND BLEED FOR A FEW MINUTES, THUS REDUCING THE PRESSURE ON YOUR VEINS. REMEMBER TO USE A TIMER.
4. A MOUSE TRAP PLACED ON TOP OF YOUR ALARM CLOCK WILL PREVENT YOU FROM ROLLING OVER AND GOING BACK TO SLEEP AFTER YOU HIT THE SNOOZE BUTTON.
5. IF YOU HAVE A BAD COUGH, TAKE A LARGE DOSE OF LAXATIVES. THEN YOU'LL BE AFRAID TO COUGH.
6. YOU NEED ONLY TWO TOOLS IN LIFE - WD-40 AND DUCT TAPE. IF IT DOESN'T MOVE AND SHOULD, USE THE WD-40. IF IT SHOULDN'T MOVE AND DOES, USE THE DUCT TAPE.
7. IF YOU CAN'T FIX IT WITH A HAMMER, YOU'VE GOT AN ELECTRICAL PROBLEM.
THOUGHT for the day:
SOME PEOPLE ARE LIKE SLINKIES - NOT REALLY GOOD FOR ANYTHING, BUT THEY BRING A SMILE TO YOUR FACE WHEN THEY'RE PUSHED DOWN THE STAIRS.
eof
--
Find out what people will submit to, and you have found out the
exact amount of injustice and wrong which will be imposed on them.
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wrote:

I'd be interested as well. Thanks, Tom.
--
Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany
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On 6/19/2015 11:40 PM, Steve W. wrote:

To get the 1" face, gang up 2 thinner brushes. Get Osborn or Weiler at a welding supply. Use .014" to .020" wire. Get knot-type brushes for heavy-duty work. Get crimped for more general purpose.
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Tom Gardner wrote:

MSC has Weiler. 1" face was $90.00 Not a fan of the price there but I'll dig around.
The ancient one on it was a B&D industrial, 1" face, crimped with .018 wire. Filled as close to solid as I've ever seen on a wire wheel. But like everything else "They don't make those any longer"...
The grinder itself is one of the OLD 6" B&D Heavy duty ones. The plant my father worked at had to get it out of the place as it doesn't meet OSHA standards. All cast iron. Built back when "close enough" wasn't good enough.
--
Steve W.

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I used to get durable (but thinner) wire wheels from Canadian Tire. But they were so out of balance that I'd end up welding 1" of 3/8" dia. steel to the hub to static-balance it.

I still use a B&D grinder for wire wheels and abrasive mesh wheels. It's cast aluminum from about 1925. (I have a 1925 catalog showing a B&D 1/2" drill of the same style -- and I have one those 1/2" drills, still in use, too.)
In the late 70's, a brush holder on the grinder broke. Drove 75 miles to Halifax to the B&D repair shop, grinder & part in hand. Before computers, y'know. The guy started at the left hand end of the bookshelf with the microfiche albums, moved his finger along to the fat, shiny, hard-bound catalogs, then to the older paper catalogs, then to the thin, grubby, stapled catalogs. Finally, at the far right-hand end of the shelf, he pulled out the very last item, a grimy, tattered thing of about 10 or 20 pages, found my grinder there, read off the part number. He had three on the shelf so I bought two. Damn thing is still going, haven't needed the 2nd holder yet.
Not like that any more. Around 2004 I phoned whatever it is that has replaced the guy with the catalogs about a bearing for a B&D 4-1/2" angle grinder bought new in the late 70s. Young feller says, "Jeeeez, that's an *old* one!" It was listed on their computer but no bearing available, had to go to a generic seal & bearing place to get one.
I love using old tools so I'm still grumpy about my Atlas-Copco compressor -- early 50s or older. I finally found a guy who knew a guy who had access to the global Atlas-Copco product database. He reported that there was no record anywhere of a compressor of that model made under their marque. Huh. Big ol' cast iron crankcase cover with "Atlas-Copco" cast in, too.
--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada

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