Nice buy on Torque Screwdriver

I just bought an old stock/new Torque Screwdriver for $33 from an eBay Surplus Dealer. A Sturtevant Richmont CAL 36/4. See:
http://www.srtorque.com/error-proofing-tools/torque-screwdrivers-and-kits/adjustable-torque-screwdrivers/cal-series/
It is basically new, just been on a shelf somewhere collecting dust. Wanted it for mounting scopes on springer air guns which are notorious for moving them around during use. I'm no stranger to tightening small screws but didn't want to risk crushing the scopes either. For some discussion see:
http://www.gatewaytoairguns.org/GTA/index.php?PHPSESSIDJ46896003f9c21bd227e5a5f9c992d0&topic 223.0
I used this model at work for many years for torquing down RF shields in radios. It worked flawlessly, never had any trouble with it. Really pleased to come across this buy :)
Torquing the shields in a uniform manner was recommended to minimize microphonics in certain models. The RF shields covered the synthesizer/modulation area. The old Motorola Mostar/Traxar line had several problem areas...
Found some charts and tips on recommended torque values:
http://www.federalscrewproducts.com/torque-chart.htm
http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/lid 816/guntechdetail/Torque_Specifications_for_Gunsmiths
http://precisionrifleblog.com/2013/03/22/rifle-screw-torque-settings-specifications/
I never had any trouble with mounting scopes in the past but I suspect the older ones had heavier tubes than what is being turned out today. I wasn't mounting them on guns well known for beating up scopes either...
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

ki

<snip>
I've got a growing collection of metric calibrated Tonichi brand torque drivers for use on European target pistols. For things like locking barrels in place, I want to make sure I'm using as much force as possible, but without risking stripping the threads out of a $2000 pistol.
They mostly use allen socket head screws of one sort of another, including lots of setscrews. Here's a good chart for those sorts of fasteners:
http://www.holo-krome.com/pdf/torquedatachart.pdf
Doug White
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 25 Nov 2016 15:20:32 GMT
<snip>

Nice, dedicated drivers would be really handy if you were doing this on a regular basis. Instructions for the CAL 36/4 (located at their website) recommended setting it back to 0 when not being used for a period of time. Never saw the instruction sheet for the one I had at work. It was probably set around 15 inch pounds all the time I had it. Consistency across all the screws, kinda like head bolts was more important than the torque value I think...

Nice chart, saved it. Thanks!
I'll have to study the Federal fastener chart I linked to a bit better. It had different materials listed but I didn't understand if that was for the screw or the material it was going into...
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 25 Nov 2016 12:09:01 -0400
http://www.federalscrewproducts.com/torque-chart.htm
<snip>

It looks to be for the screw/fastener material. I see columns for Grade 2, 5, and 8 that I didn't notice at first...
I'll try to use info from the installation instructions if provided for scope mounting. Maybe compare it to the generic charts as a double check and use some common sense :)
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
----- Original Message -----
Newsgroups: rec.crafts.metalworking Sent: Friday, November 25, 2016 6:24 AM Subject: Nice buy on Torque Screwdriver

A lot of guys have given up on purely friction mounting going to adjusting against the bell or the adjustment "tower?" for the rings and a locking pin that engages the receiver for the bases if they aren't using a pacatinny rail. Personally I just gave up on springers and have gone all PCP for my shooting pleasure. Pretty hard to beat 80-100 shot on a fill (at 20FPE) with my .177 and 25-50 shots at 60FPE in .25.
Sorry, I don't visit that site anymore. Not even as a guest. They have a lot of great "old" info there, but the best builders I know (atleast in PCP) are over at Air Gun Guild.
Looks like a nice score on that torque driver. I always envy somebody else's great luck a little bit.
When I still shot springers I really liked the Hammer's Magnum scopes. Never really had any slip issues, but then both of my springers have picatiny rails.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 25 Nov 2016 12:31:39 -0700
<snip>

Yeah, I'm familiar with the pin in the mount and I've seen some of what they are doing with strategically positioning the scope body. I've got one dovetail adapter to install with a Picatinny on top. Won't know if there is a pin hole or not till a remove the existing rear site. Either going to drill a shallow hole or maybe just file a shallow groove/slot for it if there isn't one. That gun isn't all that expensive... The other one should come with a Picatinny/Weaver rail and the scope will have Weaver mounts.
I'm looking at PCP guns but I'm not there yet. Some pretty amazing stuff out there. I've been perusing some of the UK Magazines, stuff you just don't see/hear much in the States...
Glad I bought my Diana 48 in .177 many years ago when I was still working. They haven't gotten any cheaper :)
<snip>

It is way more tool than I need but I got it for less than the cheapo versions I was seriously considering. Sometimes you get lucky...

I'm sticking with inexpensive scopes just now to see how it goes. If the guns trash them but I liked how they were working I'll get better ones. I'm no stranger to good scopes, have some nice Leupold, Burris, Weaver, Herters... on big bang guns. They haven't gotten any cheaper either ;-)
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    An interesting looking tool. I've got some of the Utica torque limiting screwdrivers -- which may actually be the ones which they write about which are sensitive to down force changing the calibration.
    However, I tend to not apply significant down force, so no problem for me, I think.
    But one intesting thing in the "Cautions: " section of the manual I find intersting:
===================================================================== =====================================================================     I thought that the basic principle of a torque limiting screwdriver was that it made it impossible to exceed the capacity of the screwdriver (or even just the set torque).
    Anyway -- congratulations on a lucky purchase.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Remove oil spill source from e-mail
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | (KV4PH) Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.