Noisy T&C grinder head

I have a particular tool and cutter grinder. Its head is noisy, in
fact, its noise resembles the sound of a rotary siren (though not as
loud). Would you say that the most likely cause of it is bad bearings?
Reply to
Ignoramus22345
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Either in the head or in the motor
Gunner
Reply to
Gunner Asch
Makes a lot of sense
Reply to
Ignoramus22345
If the motor is tied directly to the spindle..remove the motor and run. If you still hear the squealing..check the sheetmetal around the fan and see if it got dented. If it still squeals...hold a long screw driver to the bearing areas on each end and put the screw driver handle in your ear for a stethescope.
If it comes from the spindle...pull the bearings AND MAKE A DRAWING of it being disassembled (or take photos as you remove each part) and order and install new bearings
Gunner
Reply to
Gunner Asch
Gunner Asch fired this volley in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
Um... why not just use the _almost_new_ Snap-On Mechanic's Stethoscope he bought for $2.00?
Seriously... It must've been over 40 years ago that I learned the value of having an _actual_ professional stethoscope with interchangable probe tips in the kit.
Especially for machines with big tin bodies around them, they're invaluable for finding where the real noise is coming from.
Further, unless you stick it into a running fan, or light it on fire, a good stethoscope is a one-time purchase.
There are inexpensive electronic versions with contact microphones, too. I dunno if they'd last forever like mechanical ones do, but if you keep the batteries stored separate from the tool, one should last many decades.
Lloyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Jon, one cannot be led on a wild goose chase unless one is _willing_ to be led.
Ig may not ask the questions you approve of, but he also isn't demanding that you, personally, spend your time to answer them. You _could_ just ignore them... no?
You put more energy into complaining about them than many legitimate answerers put into their answers!
That last question was one of those "well... DUH!" ones to me, too. But at least when someone gives Ig an answer, he considers it, might use it, tries to understand it. (FWIW, he GIVES answers to folks, too... about higher math. No... polar trigonometry is not higher math. I mean h.i.g.h.e.r. math...)
Ig's not like that dope who keeps coming back around asking things like how to wire a welding circuit using steel wool for wiring, or why, just because a drill bit is right-handed, couldn't he go ahead and use it in a left-hand direction anyway!
So... Jon (seriously), if you don't like his questions, why burn so many calories on telling him and us why you won't answer them? Just ignore him!
Lloyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
That's one theory. Second thought, is that Gunner might have caught a couple volunteer firemen looking around his back lot, and stuffed them head first into the grease cap.
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
Is it possible to detach the two, scrape the firemen out of the grease cup, and run the motor alone? Put the firemen and the cutting head back one at a time.
Is the tool big enough for zerks, or is it perma lube? Some spray oil here or there, may give you a quick diagnosis.
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
As an old man who grew up in the shadow of The Great Depression, I'd use solvent of some kind, and clean out the old bearings. Regrease them, and see if that helped. I do think the drawings and photos are excellent idea.
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
Stormin Mormon fired this volley in news:G3rcu.116066$ snipped-for-privacy@fx09.iad:
Stormy, grease (ner oil) never helps a screaming bearing. It might help deaden the noise for a few minutes, but doesn't aid in the underlying cause, at all.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Thanks for telling us what does NOT work. Now....
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
+1
So is the $3.99 HF stethoscope.
Reply to
Larry Jaques
Stormin Mormon fired this volley in news:s7scu.106197$ snipped-for-privacy@fx14.iad:
Ok... Stormy, usually you 'get it' even if you don't have any experience with something.
Let me ask YOU. If you had some precision bearings, and they were galled, pitted, corroded, or just stuck... and you confirmed that lubrication would not fix the problem... What would you do next?
Would you pump them full of valve grinding compound, and let them run a few hours?
C'mon!
Lloyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
The OP wants to know what to do with bearings that havn't been tested, dissembled, and relubricated. At this point, we're not to the relube point, yet. So, you're changing the question.
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
Good point.
I bought a stethescope a few years ago for just this need..and found out it works very well...but a screw driver works Almost as well and doesnt need any special care in my tool box.
Shrug
Gunner
Reply to
Gunner Asch
True indeed. However...if it was surplus machinery..it probably had a hard life..and more than likely cleaning and greasing old bearings will increase the lifespan a small amount..but not really "fix" the propblem. Shrug...When I fix a clients machine...I avoid putting bandaids on them..I fix them properly so it has a much much longer life span.
For a hobby shop..your method will probably be viable.
Gunner
Reply to
Gunner Asch
Jon boi is a mentally ill disturbed whining bitch who is living his miserable life in Section 8 housing and trying to grab onto the "good old days"...though even in the Shining Times...he was a worthless shit.
Reply to
Gunner Asch
There are bearings..and then there are high precision bearings.
Motor beariings may or may not be medium precison bearings
Spindle bearings ARE high precison bearings
Yes..Iggy could probably stuff oatmeal in the bearings of either one and make it quiet enough to sell. And when the new owner gets it back to his shop and it starts to squeal within an hour..they are going to pull it down, check the bearings..descover the "oatmeal" used to camoflage the squeal..and be less than comfortable buying the next item Iggy has for sale.
Bearings of this nature are cheap enough. Motor bearings can be had for $5 for the pair if you want to run Chinese bearings (I dont..but..they work well enough for motors) However..spindle bearings are High Precision bearings..and they might cost him $50 for the pair. And when he sells it..he tells them he put brand new NSK/SKS etc etc bearings in the spindle and they are very happy with him and they buy other machinery from him with full confidence at his asking price.
You dont work in the manufacturing/machinery repair industry...so you really dont have a clue how the thinking works.
People who buy used machinery..know full well that they are not buying a brand new machine...but they expect it to do what they are buying it For..and unless they are told up front that bearings are bad...they expect them to be "adequate". Bearings can be a pain in the ass to replace in metalworking machinery. Seriously....
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This (below) was a simple bearing repair..that required a forklift just to remove the assembly..and the bearings themselves were $600 (5 bearings total)
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the photos above were just a sampling of the 50 (of each projec)t or more I took while I was disassembling the turret..so I would know how to put each back together again. As you will notice..the crack in the casting was the issue with the turret..but because of the expense of repairing the crack ($1800 for labor)...putting in new bearings was indicated and the client agreed) Now they dont ever have to worry about spending another $1800 just to remove the bastard again when a bearing goes out..and it would have)
Its not...always like swapping out wheel bearings on your Chevy Luv......
Gunner
Reply to
Gunner Asch
Bearings for these are $100 per pair, you need two pairs for the spindle. It is not that big of a deal. Grease would not help bearings with bad geometry.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus17776
Only good for fertiliser.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus17776

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