Not a typical impact wrench

Video filmed by my spouse
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To try this behemoth on my compressor, I had to make this air fitting
made of 1/2" NPT pipe cap that I drilled and threaded for 1/4" NPT.
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fitting can be seen at the end of black hose.
Reply to
Ignoramus8260
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Yes, that sounds close (my splined end's OD is 1.62") This one was the first one I saw. It requires a burly man to use it properly. Supposedly, with proper air supply, it is hard to keep it in one's hands if it is started without load (due to recoil).
i
Reply to
Ignoramus8260
I've only seen one impact wrench bigger than that, and it was for fitting cylinder head nuts on a large freighter ship. It looked like a jackhammer and had something like a 2" square drive to the sockets.
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy
Reminds me of the hydraulics we used to use to attach blow out preventer stacks to a Christmas tree. They had a leverage bar with a chain on it that had to be dogged off to something solid. The thing would kill you or really hurt you if it got a good bite and all that was holding it back was a measly 200# roughneck. The nuts were about 3 1/2". Took about ten minutes to get it into position, and about three seconds to run the nut down.
It was either that or Cameron hammer wrenches. Now, THAT was a lot of work.
Steve
Reply to
Steve B
I feel inferior with a measly imitation Christmas tree that is held by 1/4"-20 screws...
Another interesting thing to try could be using a impact wrench to drive posthole digger screw. It should work, logically speaking. Even a regular 400 ft-lbs impact should offer quite a lot of torque. A impact socket could be welded axially to the posthole digger screw. If I can find a screw like this, cheaply, I would try it.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus22887
Didn't see the video yet, but that looks like the specialized wrench they use for steel building erection. Might be worth a pretty penny if you find the right buyer.
Don't even bother running it off a home compressor. It's made to run off a 3/4" hose and a 100HP or so engine driven unit like they use for sandblasting and gunite. With a small hose it won't run worth anything, and with the right hose an 80-gallon tank won't last long. It'll go around three times and pfft...
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Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman
I hope that it is the case. At least it seems to be in good shape and came from a small bankrupt custom hydraulics shop.
What was amazing is that it actually ran off my long little hose (without load). Otherwise, yes, I agree.
It requires a burly man to operate it. It weighs 38 lbs.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus22887
that thing is starving for air , you should not be able to hold it and pull the trigger under load , 1/2 min id lines throughout and fittings as well , any hting over 50 feet step up to 3/4 , that baby should make 2200 to 3000 foot pounds depending on the air supply and should sound like a mountain lion in a blender when properly gassed.
i have an industrial ingersoll 3/4 and 1 inch drive pistol grips that will do 1600 and 2000 foot pounds while my air supply holds up , i have two 80 gallon tanks and i can run for about 8-10 seconds at full tilt
Ignoramus8260 wrote:
Reply to
c.henry
I can barely hold it without power at all, a slight exaggeration, but I am definitely not comfortable holding it extended out in front of me.
It is, most likely, a older I-R 2950B1, see
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It fits the description at 38 lbs of weight and 14+ inches of total length.
I have never before seen anything as powerful for the size. 70 CFM equates to approximately 17HP compressor motor's power, using my compressor's efficiency as a basis. Probably 7 HP output from that wrench at full power.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus22887
you can take apart anything with them babies , yours looks like a spline drive , you can get the anvil { spline part } changed out for a nominal amount , yours probably uses either one or one and a half . sockets can be found for a song on ebay. Ingersoll does make some of thosebig wrenches for steel erection that are torque sensing and able to be set to a definite torque setting , quite pricey . mine are dudda type
as in threee or four duddas
Ignoramus22887 wrote:
Reply to
c.henry
It is called Spline Drive #5. It is 1.62" in diameter.
Sockets are kind of expensive from my POV, looks like they are about $10 apiece. I know that they are big and must be expensive though.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus22887
"Ignoramus22887" wrote
Some oilfield memories .........
They used a device called "tongs" up on the drill floor. It is essentially a pipe wrench on steroids that has a cable attached to the end, and that cable attached to the draw works. So heavy it hangs from a 5'8" wire rope bridle. The draw works could apply enough force to bend the handle of the tongs as easy as a piece of coathanger wire. The tongs were used to tighten and loosen the joining portions of 5" hollow drill pipes and attached tools, stabilizers, and "stuff". It had a gauge, and any driller who messed up a set of tongs usually was on the next chopper out.
They even came out with spinner tongs in the 70s that had a roller chain assembly to spin the pipe until it seated for making up with the tongs. Before that, they used a "spinning chain" which would spin the pipe. Many a tooth, nail, and finger was lost to those spinning chains. There was a special way to braid a rope that looked like a woman's pigtail, declining in thickness until it was nothing. No knots. It was on the end of the spinning chain, and easily flowed through the gloves. It was forgiving ....... the chain was not.
One of the most awesome things I ever saw was a Hydril. You have seen a machine that backs up to a tree, and four or eight triangular rams cut it out of the ground, root ball and all. Imagine one of those but with hardened blades hydraulically powered that is designed to clamp down on a piece of 20" drill pipe and shear off the pipe and contain everything coming out of the pipe no matter what temperature or pressure. About eight feet tall, six feet in diameter, and mostly steel except for the hole in the middle. Those were fun to load and unload with a crane. (I was a crane operator.) And a joy to put on a big piece of casing. BOPs, Hydrils, Christmas Trees, Chickshin lines, 200 ton jacks. Ah, the good old days.
God, just thinking about all my experiences around an oil rig and on a drill floor brings back a big flood of memories.
High adventure. It was like getting to be a pirate.
Steve
Reply to
Steve B
All those experiences would be very unusual to me. It was very interesting to read. Thank you.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus22887
"Ignoramus22887" wrote
I have seen and done a lot.
And you, my friend, seem to also. You are always working on something. Rebuilding something. Making something. You got a good brain and a diplomatic disposition.
You would have been a good oilfield hand.
Steve
Reply to
Steve B
Hammer wrenches...been there..done that..worked my way around a tree more than a few times. First time I had a broken bone..standing in a well celler, reaching around the tree holding onto the wrench and the ginzel nailed me in the elbow with his sledge.
Now that HURT.
Gunner
"A prudent man foresees the difficulties ahead and prepares for them; the simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences." - Proverbs 22:3
Reply to
Gunner
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Hydraulic tong are mostly used today.
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Particularly on workover rigs. Time is money.
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I could do a 6 wrap easily, when I was working in the patch.
I had the wrists to do a good flip.
Now days..they either use a spinner
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Or power tongs. Tubing/casing uses slightly less powerful but faster power tongs than do drill pipe.
Also known as a BAG, BOP, or Blow out preventer.
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That smell of drilling mud, ringing iron and the scent of diesel fuel in the air still brings back a lot of memories for me. Some I actually miss.
Standing on the top of the drilling rig at 4am, overlooking a snow covered forest, -20F, so crisp and cold the stars look like white hot pin pricks with the northern lights sheeting in different colors overhead.....
The team work of pulling a wet string on a triple, everyone joking and pissing and moaning, covered to the eyeballs in drilling mud or oil, making a "trip" as fast as you can...only teeth and eyes visible through the mud covering everybody...
Hell..hardly anybody gets dirty on the rigs anymore...chuckle
Ill have to dig into my boxes of photos and scan some stuff.
Gunner
"A prudent man foresees the difficulties ahead and prepares for them; the simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences." - Proverbs 22:3
Reply to
Gunner
That's actually pretty cheap for those sockets, as most places want $40-$200 per socket in that size range. How much you want for that beast? I've actually been looking for one recently.
Reply to
B.B.
Hi BB, write me privately at ichudov AT algebra DOT com.
igor
Reply to
Ignoramus1759

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