On topic: a metal art project


Daughter Karen came over today for an art project. She's the artist,
I was just the proprietor of the shop ... uh, studio today.

Materials: one sheet of 22 gage (.031) steel about 3' x 3', a
few ounces of smokeless gunpowder.
Tools: plasma cutter, small MIG welder, chalk, misc

First she cut about 6" off of one side to make it 2.5' x 3' or so.
Used a piece of 1.5" x 1/4" bar as a straightedge, swooped along that
with the plasma torch. Man, I have never seen a smoother plasma cut.
It dang near looked like it had been sheared. No cleanup with file or
air sander necessary, it was good to go.

Then she used chalk to draw swooping lines on the thin, rusty steel.
They were fairly short and abstractly disconnected but by golly it
looked sorta like a tree. When she was happy with that, she made
freehand cuts along the chalk lines with the plasma. The result was
very, very thin kerfs in the metal. I don't know how wide, but
perhaps 0.5mm or so, more or less. Very thin. Then she went round
and zipped some holes near the "branches" that would be where leaves
or fruit might be.

We held this up with the sun behind it. WOW! Looked like
impossibly-thin glowing lines that were the merest suggestion of a
tree but the eye and brain still saw TREE. I didn't get a photo
but perhaps she'll take one when she gets it up in her apartment back
in Gotham. It will have LED backlighting.

Then she sprinkled gunpowder along the cuts on one side, kinda nudged
it into little rows and ignited it. It burned amazingly slowly, about
as exciting as charcoal lighter, leaving textured black smudges along
the lines that look sort of like bark. It smelled wonderful.

I have no idea where she got the ideas for this project. She
continues to amaze me. She was worrying about using up my good
pristine rawstock. Pristine in shape only, it had some very
interesting rust patterns and colors on it. I told her I'd been
hoarding it behind the lathe for most of 20 years to use for
autobody rust work, don't do that anymore and if I should ever need
some 22 gage steel I can get it at the metalmonger's. It was way
worth the rawstock just seeing what she did with it.

She said she thinks the plasma cutter is her new favorite tool. It
does seem to have that effect on people. It's a nothin' special
Thermal Dynamics PackMaster 38XL I picked up most of a decade ago.

I was teasing her about what fun it might be getting her creation back
to Brooklyn, imagining the airport sniffers going bonkers with all
that GSR and Karen trying to explain her "art project" colored with a
few tablespoons of ignited gunpowder. "Art project colored with
gunpowder, uh huh. We'll need you to step over here, Ma'am, keep
your hands where we can see them."

She said hm, maybe she'd FedEx it to herself. Her employer probably
wouldn't blink if she FedEx'd herself a piano. I think they like
her.


Reply to
Don Foreman
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On Sat, 22 Aug 2009 00:14:34 -0500, the infamous Don Foreman scrawled the following:
Very cool. Please post the pic when you get it, Don.
Yeah, that's a better smell than Hoppes!
I can hear them now..."Wow, we actually get to DO something today! Book 'em, Dano!"
Bueno. She'd better mark "May smell of gunpowder" on the outside of the box, so they don't think she's trying to hide anything.
P.S: Nice story, once again.
Reply to
Larry Jaques
Aren't Daughter's wonderful!
D> Daughter Karen came over today for an art project. She's the artist,
Reply to
Shabtai
Daughter Karen came over today for an art project. She's the artist, I was just the proprietor of the shop ... uh, studio today.
Materials: one sheet of 22 gage (.031) steel about 3' x 3', a few ounces of smokeless gunpowder. Tools: plasma cutter, small MIG welder, chalk, misc
First she cut about 6" off of one side to make it 2.5' x 3' or so. Used a piece of 1.5" x 1/4" bar as a straightedge, swooped along that with the plasma torch. Man, I have never seen a smoother plasma cut. It dang near looked like it had been sheared. No cleanup with file or air sander necessary, it was good to go.
Then she used chalk to draw swooping lines on the thin, rusty steel. They were fairly short and abstractly disconnected but by golly it looked sorta like a tree. When she was happy with that, she made freehand cuts along the chalk lines with the plasma. The result was very, very thin kerfs in the metal. I don't know how wide, but perhaps 0.5mm or so, more or less. Very thin. Then she went round and zipped some holes near the "branches" that would be where leaves or fruit might be.
We held this up with the sun behind it. WOW! Looked like impossibly-thin glowing lines that were the merest suggestion of a tree but the eye and brain still saw TREE. I didn't get a photo but perhaps she'll take one when she gets it up in her apartment back in Gotham. It will have LED backlighting.
Then she sprinkled gunpowder along the cuts on one side, kinda nudged it into little rows and ignited it. It burned amazingly slowly, about as exciting as charcoal lighter, leaving textured black smudges along the lines that look sort of like bark. It smelled wonderful.
I have no idea where she got the ideas for this project. She continues to amaze me. She was worrying about using up my good pristine rawstock. Pristine in shape only, it had some very interesting rust patterns and colors on it. I told her I'd been hoarding it behind the lathe for most of 20 years to use for autobody rust work, don't do that anymore and if I should ever need some 22 gage steel I can get it at the metalmonger's. It was way worth the rawstock just seeing what she did with it.
She said she thinks the plasma cutter is her new favorite tool. It does seem to have that effect on people. It's a nothin' special Thermal Dynamics PackMaster 38XL I picked up most of a decade ago.
I was teasing her about what fun it might be getting her creation back to Brooklyn, imagining the airport sniffers going bonkers with all that GSR and Karen trying to explain her "art project" colored with a few tablespoons of ignited gunpowder. "Art project colored with gunpowder, uh huh. We'll need you to step over here, Ma'am, keep your hands where we can see them."
She said hm, maybe she'd FedEx it to herself. Her employer probably wouldn't blink if she FedEx'd herself a piano. I think they like her.
HHmmmnnnn! Wonder where daughter Karen got that there artistic streak ? Musta been Mary.
Bob Swinney
Reply to
Robert Swinney
Sometimes it just pops up out of no where. At least that's the case with my sister. No one else in the family has even a trace of artistic talent.
Don, show us pics when you can. I've come to expect pictures of any Foreman TM project.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
I didn't take any photos! I'm hoping Karen will.
Reply to
Don Foreman
been Mary. She probably did get it from maternal ancestors but Mary isn't her mom.
Reply to
Don Foreman
--Speaking of girls in shop have you heard of the Flaming Lotus Girls? Awesome shop and awesome work.
Reply to
steamer
Links?
Whenever a Liberal utters the term "Common Sense approach"....grab your wallet, your ass, and your guns because the sombitch is about to do something damned nasty to all three of them.
Reply to
Gunner Asch
Sounds like she's a candidate for the Guild of Metalsmiths, based in the twin cities.
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Can't help but advertise; our annual conference is Sep 18,19 & 20 at the Little Log House Show Grounds in Hastings, Mn. ----nice gallery for a new member, too. We have several artist-metalsmiths in our group.
Long time member, Pete Stanaitis
D> Daughter Karen came over today for an art project. She's the artist,
Reply to
spaco
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formatting link
Reply to
steamer
Cool!!!!
Gunner
Whenever a Liberal utters the term "Common Sense approach"....grab your wallet, your ass, and your guns because the sombitch is about to do something damned nasty to all three of them.
Reply to
Gunner Asch
On 24 Aug 2009 18:27:51 GMT, the infamous steamer scrawled the following:
Man, is Burning Man the next event Dems will cap and trade, or just cancel?
Reply to
Larry Jaques

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