OT Car Problems OT

snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:


Yeah some of those across the pond imports will make you cry when you start a "simple" job, then discover what you need to do first...
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Steve W.

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wrote:

Just replacing the heater fan in a Nissan Rogue took me hours and hours.
Remove the steering wheel and gas pedal for starters... and even after you follow the service manual to the letter it takes a contortionist to reach inside the center of the dash from one side and put enough force on the part to get it to budge.
--sp
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Spehro Pefhany
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On Mon, 02 Nov 2015 14:31:52 -0500, Spehro Pefhany

Renault's better ideas. (Renault owns nissan).
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    [ ... ]

    To replace the clutch in an MGA (1956-1963 IIRC), according to the manual, you have to remove the seats, the floorboards (plywood) and the trans tunnel. Removing the floorboards is a real pain, as they have long machine screws through threaded holes in the frame rails which stick down and get rusted from splatter, and bent if you drive over rocky roads.
    This all to pull the engine and transmission as a unit -- the bell housing is part of the transmission casting, so you can't split them until the engine/trans is out of the car.
    In reality -- if you work at it (and are young and limber), you can (with one friend as a helper) remove the tail shock mount bolt working from under the car with just the gearshift tower bellows and the relatively small plate to which it attached, and then the shift tower itself (four bolts and it just pulls up). Then you take a spare old fan belt and hook it over the coupling flange to the driveshaft, so you can pull up on the tail to take stress off the bolt -- or to get it lined up so the bolt can go back in.
    I learned all of this after the first time I had to replace a clutch.
    Also -- while it is out, replace the synchronizer rings in the transmission. :-)
    Another gem from the manual involves disassembling the trans so you can do the above.
    "Withdraw the three sliding rods and forks."     "Note the three balls and springs released in consequence."
    "Released" as in "Launched at high velocity" unless you use a wadded rag to catch them. :-)
    And the final part of almost every entry:
    "Reassembly is a reversal of the above."
    As far as things in the dash -- you just reach under the dash and can get to everything. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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wrote:

You want to try it on a Rover 2000. My brother made the mistake of trying to start his while it was already running, and it took the starter drive right off the starter. We managed to split the trans from the engine far enough to get a wire hook between and fish the starter parts out the top. Changing the clutch would be a different story.
Or try it on a Renault R12. Front wheel drive, longitudinally mounted. We ended up re-shaping the trans hump at the firewall with a hammer so we could get the transmission far enough back to get it out without removing the engine.
Or the old Austin/Morris Mini. The clutch cover needs to come off to get at the clutch - the manual says the engine needs to come out. I took all the bolts out but the one that would hit the frame - I loosened it and cut it off with a hacksaw between the cover and the housing so I could get the cover off with the engine in place. Left the bolt out.
To remove the lower control arm on a Mystique, the engine needs to be unbolted and raised to remove the bolts - that go in from the TOP. I loosened the bolts, pushed them up as far as they could go, and cut the bolt heads off - then replaced them from the bottom, putting the nuts on the top - because lifting that engine, in that engine compartment, is NOT a simple job.
As we always said, sometimes you need to cheat to eat.
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    [ ... ]

    [ ... ]

    Ouch! What failed in there? The starter ring gear which is heat shrunk onto the flywheel? (At least in an MGA). On an MGA, pretty much everything else in the starter is removed by two bolts through the rear engine plate and into the bell housing (which, as I mentioned previously, is a part of the transmission casting, not a separate part). (Of course, you also have to remove some wires to the cable-operated high current contact points for the starter switch.)
    [ ... ]

    That reminds me of changing the oil filter. The filter was a pleated felt and wire screen assembly in a drawn steel cover which came with the car -- held on by a long through bolt. To get the last few turns to get that free, you had to loosen the engine mount bolts and jack up one side of the engine.
    When I saw that the MGB had a casting which bolted in place of the original filter, and to which the filter and housing were attached from above -- just reaching down beside the engine -- I got that casting and added it. Unfortunately, the hoses to the oil cooler in front of the radiator were hardened with heat and age, and one failed rather soon, so I had to get new hoses too. :-(

    I don't know the Mystique, but perhaps I should be glad of that, based on what you say here. :-)

    Or to just get the car working again on your own. Nobody was paying me to work on the MGA -- I was doing it for my own satisfaction, back in the days when you did not need a degree in electronics and computers to repair a car. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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wrote:

It's the old "crash" starter. or reverse Inertia drive. It is fastened on by a little clip at the end, then there is the spring on the helix, and then the gear. The gear pulls in TOWARDS the starter to engage - and if you engage it with the engine running, it can take the clip off and shho the spring, helix, and gear into the bell housing.

Never had that issue on mine - and it was the early 850. On the newer engines they got a spin-on.

Did you have the oil thermostat too? LubriTherm or something like that.

AKA the Mondeo -

The mini was my first car. The Rover was my older brother's 6th ot 7th. The Mistake was my wife's car before the current Taurus. The transmission pan was on the front of the trans on that critter too - between the trans and the front frame crossmember. Needed a crowbar to shift the engine back on the mounts to get the pan off.

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    [ ... ]

    Ouch! Fun to retrieve the parts. :-)

    Sorry -- I was still talking about the MGAs -- 1500, 1600, and 1600 Mk II (1498 cc, 15?? cc, and 1622 cc -- I never had the plain 1600, just the Mark II.)
    The casting I mentioned was for the MGB (starting at about 1800 cc.)
    I did have a MGB engine in my 1600 Mk II at the end of its life. Made it rather peppy, even with the original MGA's SU carbs.

    Nope -- oil simply went from the filter through the cooler and back into the engine. That was present only on the 1600 Mk II AFIK.
    [ ... ]

    Another which I don't know.

    My first was my fathers old MGA 1500 (1957 model, FWIW). After that, a Hudson Hornet for a little while, until I got the 1600 Mk II, and after that (my first *new* vehicle) a BMW 2002.
    Enjoy         DoN.
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wrote:

Friend of mine had a 1600 twin-cam A. The engine was toast - but the head was good - and he wanted something that would stay together, so he redrilled an 1800 "B" block to fit the twincam head - 2 DCOE45 carbs, choked down to perfectly match the engine, and a set of custom made headers. That little bugger would GO!!! It fit so tight the joke was when he was finished doing anything under the hood he'd pour a gallon of water over it. If the first drop of water hit the floor in less than a minute, he'd left out something important - - -
Another friend bought a '53 TD that had been modified to put an 85HP Ford flattie in it as a drag car - and was never finished. We reconstructed the skuttle and firewall and installed an 1800 B engine, trans, and rear end. It moves out pretty good, and looks good too. Took us a couple hours dummying up the motor position to keep the SUs inside the hood and the starter out of the frame, while still keeping the tailshaft of the trans close to the center of the chassis. Right now it needs a rear wheel cyl replaced - he was supposed to get it done this spring and I was going to "babysit " it for him.
Mabee next summer. He also has a Fiat 600 with an 800 engine init, and is part way through building an Isetta 350.

Ford called it the Contour in North America. Really a nice driving car with the 2.5 liter DuraTech 4 cammer under the hood. The stock water pump was a plastic impeller that would not stay together over 5000 RPM - with that problem out of the way it would wind up to well over 6500. I have NO idea what the top speed was, but at 100MPH 160KPH) it would still downshift from overdive to direct and gain speed. Closest thing to a Rover 2000TC in ride and handling - and a whole lot simpler to keep on the road. The electrical system was a wee bit dodgy - I had a couple connectors heat up and burn off over the years we owned it - but other than that it was pretty good.

The last good car to come off the BMW assembly line (2002Tii) but even then, it was NOT an easy car to maintain.
I went from the mini to a '63 Valliant that I did up the 170 leaning tower of power into a 206HP 125+ MPH machine, (6500 RPM in top gear) then a '69 Dart 225 that would go all day at 104MPH - but not a bit faster.(would not wind tighter than 5000RPM)
From then on I kept my vehicles pretty well stock - the '53 Coronet Red Ram had a semi-grind cam and a 60 thou overbore, - but was still a pretty mild "Hemi"

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On Mon, 02 Nov 2015 23:01:34 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

One friend with a late '40s Morris Oxford used an axe to modify the floor enough to do transmission work. Had I tried that on my'49 I would have had Fred Flinstones car - while driving, I could watch both front wheels go round and when driving in rain I had to wear a raincoat!

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Gerry :-)}
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On Tue, 03 Nov 2015 23:50:52 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.ca wrote:

My mini was rusted under the crossmember the seat fastened to. The floor sheet metal formed a little "scoop" down there, and when I hit a water puddle it was "thumbs down" to plug a couple holes that were provided by the factory in that crossmember ot everyone got a shower, and the windshield got washed on the inside. I think I finaly screwed a licence plate over the hole from below.
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On Mon, 02 Nov 2015 13:03:09 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Try getting an intake gasket kit for an AC Bristol on a Saturday. <g>
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Ed Huntress

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On Mon, 02 Nov 2015 13:03:09 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

As if price, reliability, maintenance, PrinceOfDarkness affiliation weren't enough, eh?

R&R engine, replace core? Kinda reminds me of replacing spark plugs in '64-1/2 Mustang with the 260cid V-8. The Flat Rate was something like a day.
I loved Mom's car, otherwise.
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my public service, and of retiring with hands clean as they are empty.
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On Mon, 02 Nov 2015 12:24:28 -0800, Larry Jaques

20 minutes on a good day with the 260 or 289. Now a 428CJ in a '68 or '69 - that is a "horse" of a completely different colour!! Manual recommends removing both engine mounts - one at a time. It CAN be done on a cold engine with just the right combination of precision U-Joints and extentions - and using a 2 foot piece of vacuum hose to get a few of them started into the holes. A couple of colourful incantations also appears to help.....
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On Sat, 31 Oct 2015 20:38:30 -0700, Larry Jaques

Another point - running full heat to the floor in cold snowy conditions leads to rusting out around the windsheild. The heat evaporates the water from the floor and it rises and condenses on the cold metal of the roof, running down inside the "A" pillars, rusting them out.
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On Sat, 31 Oct 2015 23:55:22 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Interesting. Luckily, I live in a very snowy/cold area. We get about 1 foot per decade here. ;) Rains are generally slow, quiet, and gentle over a period of days instead of hours, so we don't flood much. We're 3.66" below normal for this calendar year, putting us a lot less in drought conditions than California. I'm still sore over seeing all those orchards dead and gone. There are at least a dozen, probably totaling 1000 acres, visible on I5 south between the CA/OR border and the Bay Area. Shasta Lake looks about 90' low. But CA still grows rice, requiring massive amounts of water. I just don't get it. Farkin' politics.
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wrote:

Greetings Terry, You have probably checked this but maybe not. I had a Capri years ago that started to have heating problems. I removed the thermostat and found it did not close completely. The engine warmed up like normal but when I turned on the heat the engine temp would gradually drop and the warm air from the heater would get cooler. Does the 'stat in your car close all the way? Eric
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Terry Coombs wrote:

Did you reverse flush it with the heater hose off, or just run water through the system with it closed?
How fast does it warm up to operating temp?
Grab an IR thermometer and see what the water temps through the system are. Just look for a large temperature differential to find the blockage.
I'm thinking you have some scale blocking the flow through the core. I would probably pull the lines off the core, run some Prestone flush or diluted CLR through it in a closed loop (5 gallon bucket and a drill powered pump does pretty well to circulate the flush). Then do the same with the block.
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On Friday, October 30, 2015 at 7:52:32 AM UTC-5, Terry Coombs wrote:

Instead of flushing the whole system, try flushing the heater core by itself.
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On Wed, 4 Nov 2015 11:14:12 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Is the heater valve like the one at http://www.oreillyauto.com/site/c/detail/MRY0/74650/02708.oap?year 99&make=Toyota&model=4Runner&vi57455&ck=Search_02708_1357455_-1&pt708&ppt331#compatibilityTab_ If so, definitely no thermostat action in the valve - it's not a "ranko" valve.
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