OT - sewing machine repair

On Wed, 7 Nov 2007 17:12:09 -0800, "SteveB" wrote:


All the references I find point to Dizzy Dean.
The Featherweight is a great little machine, Mom found several in her wanderings - in some ways she Out-Gunner'd Gunner by a mile. ;-) Walks in with a Ridgid #2 pipe cutter in pristine condition ($160), and she had the balls to say "It was $2 - did I pay too much?"
(Good night Mrs. Bergman, wherever you are.)
The one I grabbed to see "which model is he talking about..." was the sole 221K White (Made in Great Britain) she had. There's at least two each of the Green and Black variety around here somewhere. But I won't say where here is, in case there are any rabid quilt makers waiting to mug me for a sewing machine.
(Satire Alert - put down the Mountain Dew before reading further, unless you want a good excuse to go buy a new monitor.)
Remember The Rules: Guys don't make clothing - and we sure as HELL don't make matching His And Hers outfits - matter of fact it's your sacred duty under the Man Code to burn anything resembling them if found, and never allow yourself to be seen in public in same. :-P
But we are allowed to repair holes and ripped out inseams in work clothes, and hem our Levis and Carhartts, make sails and spray covers and light covers and shifter boots and upholstery, and do other Guy Things with a sewing machine. It still qualifies as a Power Tool, but only when used properly. ;-)
--<< Bruce >>--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 08 Nov 2007 00:08:09 -0800, with neither quill nor qualm,

I'm glad you didn't say "audacity". That took balls. ;)

Only wimmenz make quiltz.

Nah, it's the keyboard which gets ruined by sugary crap like that.

Amen!
I make my laptop glare guards with mine. And manly pillow cases. (I needed one for a reading wedge I bought which was naked.) I also used it for curtains in the gar^H^H^Hshop. We can't have people peeking at all the tools now, can we?
----------------------------------------------------------------- When I die, I'm leaving my body to science fiction. --Steven Wright ----------------------------
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
quickly quoth:

If you keep making your pillow cases out of awning canvas and your curtains out of rawhide, people are going to want to peek anyway.
-- Ed Huntress
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 8 Nov 2007 09:22:47 -0500, with neither quill nor qualm, "Ed

That sounds like an S&M shop, not my house, Ed. <g>
----------------------------------------------------------------- When I die, I'm leaving my body to science fiction. --Steven Wright ----------------------------
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 08 Nov 2007 06:01:53 -0800, Larry Jaques

Not even that, I just hose it out with 99% isopropyl alcohol followed by compressed air. Of course you might have to vacuum out the cockroaches first.

At least three times over the 12 years I worked away from home and occupied a rented room during the week, I answered phone calls from SWMBO while showing my landlady how to operate her sewing machine (which happened to be located in a corner of her bedroom)

Gerry :-)} London, Canada
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bruce L. Bergman wrote:

I managed to talk my wife into making a cover for my tig welder. If she reads this, she'll make me make it...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    [ ... ]

    Mine came from a dealer at an antique dealer cluster. He was a dealer in clocks, and I happened to notice the black box with a carrying handle, and ask what it was. (It looked like it might do as a case for a small button accordion, and I was buying concertinas and the occasional button accordion in those days.) Well ... I decided that it might prove useful, and bought it for a quite reasonable amount. It turns out that he had bought it for his wife when they got married or not too long afterwards. Then, she never used it, and he used it only to repair his Masonic regalia a time or two. His wife was no longer with us, and he decided that he had no more need for it, so that is why he was selling it. By now, I presume that he, also, is no longer with us, as I am now about the age he was when he sold it.

    Nice! My wife finds tools for me on eBay -- but she doesn't *pay* for them. :-)

    Mine is black, with some gold decorative trim over the black enamel.
    I had to go back to the bedroom to check mine. I apparently mis-remembered. It is a "221-", but whatever character follows the '-' is hiding under the head of a drive screw. It might be a 'G' or an 'O', or perhaps anything else. I guess the 'B' came from Sherlock Holmes' address -- 221B Baker street. :-)
    FWIW -- the serial number (if this helps any) is "AM402355", and the copyright date in the manual is 1955. Can that serial number refine the date of manufacture any better than that? It appears to have the full standard set of accessories -- as well as *two* of the buttonhole attachments.
    So -- I should guard mine against raids by quilters?

    :-)
    Aside from using it to stitch up the leather thumbstraps for English system concertinas, I've used it for various repairs of everyday clothing -- including repairing what my niece calls a "blowout" (the rear seam of the pants). :-)
    Oh yes -- also to put blood red buttonholes on the red-lined black vampire cape prior to some Halloween in the past -- since I got married.
    Oh yes -- and I have to do all the sewing in the house, since my wife just won't do that kind of thing. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
We have a Singer 132K6 walking foot leather and canvas machine which my grandfather bought for the carpet business he founded in 1936, although I don't know how old the machine is - be around then. My father used to show off and sew 3 ply plywood with it... Found the original packing crate under the house when granddad died... I used it the other day to fix a sun umbrella that came from the rubbish. Geoff
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Geoff wrote:

Now you're talking - that's a classic motor trimmer's machine. Built simple and robust, massive bobbin, easy to use and service. Alas, they're also pretty expensive, so I bought a Seiko walking foot instead. Not bad but with a much smaller bobbing I have to reload it more often. Will stitch 5/16" vinyl, leather, etc FAST.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 06 Nov 2007 20:27:34 -0800, Jon Anderson

Check the various second hand stores. Goodwill, St. Vincent D'Paul and so forth. One can regularly find NICE sewing machines for $20-30
Gunner
Political Correctness is a doctrine fostered by a delusional, illogical liberal minority, and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If the old lube has become thick and gunky you may be able to wash it out using aerosol pack CO contact cleaner (from Atkins / maybe Dick Smith Electronics / Repco / Coventry's). I would use white or silicone grease too, note I _don't_ mean silicon heatsink grease. Others may know a better solution, maybe try phoning local sewing machine service company. I've fixed similar things where the grease has thickened through heat, aging and dust. I have not had problems but check the contact cleaner will not harm any plastic casings or gears etc. A syringe may help get the grease in where it is needed.
I just remembered that decades ago Singer used to supply a very light oil in a plastic squeeze bottle with new sewing machines. Maybe this would still work! Good luck.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

For cleaning all the grease and junk out of anything, get Brake Clean from the auto parts store. Works great on all sorts of mechanisms. There will be no lube left, you'll have to re-lube after it dries.
Karl
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 6 Nov 2007 07:34:52 -0600, "Karl Townsend"

CAUTION: There may not be any plastic gears or cams left intact, either. Some solvents used as "Brake Cleaner" are very aggressive to plastics, and newer sewing machines have lots of plastic parts.
--<< Bruce >>--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 6 Nov 2007 23:22:57 +1100, with neither quill nor qualm, "x"

My pedal (on a CONSEW model 210 and universal table) has a brake connected through the clutch, so doublecheck that the pedal isn't all the way back when you spin the machine by hand.
Actual stiffness in a sewing machine usually indicates thread caught in places it shouldn't be. DAMHIKT. Triplecheck the bobbin area, disassemble the drive foot plates to check there, etc.

Good question. Does the local sewing machine repairman have any suggestions or carry Husky service manuals?

Grok that. Write to Husky and ask for manuals and answers to your questions if they persist. And learn how to time sewing machines. Women will cook wondrous goodies for you if you do, and your wife won't mind it. ;)
----------------------------------------------------------------- When I die, I'm leaving my body to science fiction. --Steven Wright ----------------------------
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

not sure of the husky but when the janomi sewing machine and overlocker stiffen up I remove all the fluff from the mechanisms and lube with sewing machine oil. they run like clocks for a few years after that.
shouldnt be any need to disassemble.
Stealth Pilot
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Try yahoo groups- there's several groups that are dedicated to husky (viking) sewing machines. Pat
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'd use Singer sewing machine oil and grease myself. Any sewing machine place should have it. Karl
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<snip>

<snip>
I have heard/rumor that they use Teflon bearing surfaces. Don't know how this would be done. The machine (Husqvarna) that I've stuck my nose into looked much the same as any other that needs lube. I did use some Singer Sewing Machine oil in this same machine (most any store carries this, try the Walmart sewing area). As far as I can tell it didn't have any ill effects. It really bothered me to see all the dry bearing surfaces in it...
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
thanks all for your replies.
i have now been told that they were claimed to be an impregnated style bearing. Based on everyones responses, I am moderately confident that it is not likely to be an 'exotic' lubricant, so i expect it will wash out with an ordinary type solvent, and just straight sewing machine oil will do.
(i have also tracked down a suggestion to try heating it with hair dryer/hot air gun/ for a little while. I guess this would help an impregnated bearing leak a bit of oil out onto the bearing surface to wash and relube. A sewing machine mechanic suggested 'Prolon' a 'foaming teflon spray oil used for turbos- but i cant locate anything like that.)
regards
russ

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.