Sewing machine oil (metal content)

I need to fill the bottom of my Juki sewing machine with oil (approx. 1
pint). Need it today (holiday) because my daughter is leaving for college
and I promised her that I would make a slip cover for her club chair.
Obviously, holiday and everybody is closed. Can I use the "way" oil that I
use on my milling machine and lathe (required metal content). Could I use
the "way" oil and then replace it later?
Is there anything special about sewing machine oil? Local Ace is open but I
don't want to buy 20 small tins of "3-in-1" oil.
Fast advice appreciated. Thank you!!
Ivan Vegvary
Reply to
Ivan Vegvary
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I'd use almost anything *but* way oil (well, maybe not chainsaw bar oil either)--it's way too heavy and the additives that make it tacky tend to clog wicks and such. I think spindle oil would be a pretty close match to sewing machine oil. Light hydraulic oil, light turbine oil, or ATF (though it does contain detergents), in that order IMO, would be also be OK.
Ned Simmons
Reply to
Ned Simmons
:I need to fill the bottom of my Juki sewing machine with oil (approx. 1 :pint). Need it today (holiday) because my daughter is leaving for college :and I promised her that I would make a slip cover for her club chair. :Obviously, holiday and everybody is closed. Can I use the "way" oil that I :use on my milling machine and lathe (required metal content). Could I use :the "way" oil and then replace it later? : :Is there anything special about sewing machine oil? Local Ace is open but I :don't want to buy 20 small tins of "3-in-1" oil.
Sewing machine oil is usually a vegetable-based light colored oil so that any small amounts that get on the fabric won't leave a permanent mark.
Reply to
Robert Nichols
Yes. Use the right stuff. Maybe if you have some gyroscope oil, or aircraft insturment oil.
3-in-1 is just _asking_ for trouble. It's too thick to start with, then it gets worse with age and oxidation.
Reply to
Andy Dingley
Thanks for all the above advice. I did happened to have a gallon of spindle oil, so I used some of that. Will change when stores open tomorrow.
Thanks, Ivan Vegvary
Reply to
Ivan Vegvary
As you've correctly surmised, way oil is too viscous for this application. FWIW Ms. Mulligan's singer featherweight gets lubed with 5wt ATF on a regular basis. This does not impair the apparent quality of the quilts produced.
Jim
Reply to
jim rozen
Hi Guys, I don't know about Oil in the USA but from an old retired Sewing Machine Mechanic in New Zealand we always used "Mobil DTE light" I would think you would have something similar. Any good "Light" Hydraulic oil would do. Jack
Reply to
Jack
Mary also quilts with a featherweight. Quilters do seem to love that machine. Fitch has two of 'em.
Dr. Willy, the itinerant pretty-good sewingmachine repair and tuneup guy, uses Tri-Flo -- in a little squeezebottle with a very finebore tube rather than the spraycan. He does seem to know what he's doing, surely knows far more than I do about sewing machines. He visits a nearby fabric shop every other Thursday on his route. Other than routine cleaning and lubrication, we entrust the care and tuning of Mary's featherweights and 301's to Dr. Willy.

Reply to
Don Foreman
Ya wouldn't want to use steam cylinder oil either (:
Reply to
Jim Stewart
I use the 5wt ATF in a glass hypodermic syringe to lube those machines. It's a great way to get that 'just one drop' that's required in some spots. Plastic syringes degrade and the plungers lock up on them after a while being exposed to ATF though.
Jim
Reply to
jim rozen
Check with a local sewing or fabric supply place (dry goods, maybe where the ladies go for sewing stuff). Most of them, in the U.S. anyway, carry sewing machine oil, labeled as such.
Bob Swinney
Reply to
Robert Swinney
Mineral oil, as sold in pharmacies, is water clear and a good lube. There are two grades, light for body rubs, and heavy, for a laxative. I found mixing them 50:50 gives a nice viscosity for a quenching oil while the light (in a plastic syringe) is a good light instrument oil. If you want a corrosion inhibiter additive as well then try CRC 3-36.
Ted
Reply to
Ted Edwards
I sprayed 3-36 on a couple machines. It tends to dry to a tacky state. Not what I would want on a sewing machine.
Reply to
Charles A. Sherwood
I've noticed the same thing, not necessarily a bad thing for a protective coating, but I wouldn't use it as a sewing machine lube either.
I once left a few small oilstones in a pool of 3-36 and it congealed into a sort of waxy custard as it evaporated.
Ned Simmons
Reply to
Ned Simmons
ATF. High detergent, non-gumming. Available in handy one quart containers at your local supermarket.
Jim
Reply to
jim rozen
I had a knife maker friend who used old fryer oil to quench his blades. less fire and smelled like french-fries. Karl
Reply to
Karl Vorwerk

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