OT - sewing machine repair

hi all i'm hoping one of you fine gentlemen will be able to help me gain some wife approval points...
she has a husqvarna (viking) '2000 SL' sewing machine (actually a couple,
along with a bunch of others! - we arent the only species who has to have more than one of anything!)
this one, and i think also the other, gets stuck in reverse. When opened, i can return it to forwards by applying a moderate amount of assistance to the spring return, but there is no way it will return by itself. This machine has 'lifetime lubrication' so there is no way to add oil. The action is smooth, but stiff.
Any suggestions? any idea what the original lube might be? i guess white lithium style grease, does that dry out over time?
I could disassemble but i'd rather not as i am not familiar with re-timing if that was needed.
appreciate all suggestions!
russ (from Oz)
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I'd try applying a bit of WD40 to the hinge bearing.
Bit of a sucker for sewing machines myself, bought an Husqvarna computerised one at garage sale. Works beaut on straight stitch, but smashes needle immediately upon selecting anything else. Full of stepper motors to do what was once done with simple mechanisms - I guess its brains are scrambled. Not worth the effort of learning how to fix, I'll avoid these in future.
Jordan
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How is a gum-forming water displacer going to help in a lint-heavy environment, please?
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Dave Hinz wrote:

Especially one that turns to sticky, indelible wax when the volatiles evaporate? /mark
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Dave Hinz wrote:

I was thinking of its penetrating and dissolving actions. Good idea to clean it up and lubricate properly afterwards. A poor workman blames his tools.
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wrote:

Better to use something designed as a penetrating solvent rather than a Water Displacing liquid. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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I take the point, 3in1 OK?
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wrote:

Pblaster or similar. 3n1 has little penetrating properties.
Gunner
Political Correctness is a doctrine fostered by a delusional, illogical liberal minority, and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.
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No. They sell this stuff called "sewing machine oil" at a place called the "sewing machine store". It's extremely light, doesn't gum, doesn't drip, doesn't stain, etc. It's the right material for the purpose. Unless your goal is to make the problem worse, either find out what it is (hint: not a hardware store item), or just GO BUY SOME and use the right stuff.
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Dave Hinz wrote:

Never heard of it.
Q: Is sewing machine oil thinner than penetrating oil?
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It's clear that you're not qualified to "fix" the machine you're tinkering with. Do yourself a favor and pay someone competent.
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Dave Hinz wrote:

Hey, cool down Dave. Sorry if you feel offended, just thought I'd bounce you back, fair enough?
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To answer your question, no, sewing machine oil isn't thinner than penetrating oil. But it's the lowest-viscosity oil you're likely to see for a consumer application that still has the ability to lubricate. Penetrating oil, like WD-40 and lots of other oily things, has almost no lubricating ability at all.
Any sewing-machine store will have it. Buy the most expensive kind you can find. It's the only thing to use on your sewing machine.
Having said that, I'll tell you that I cheat a little and use Starrett Instrument Oil, which is just slightly heavier, on the bearing surfaces in my old Morse machine that I have identified as high-load bearings. I've gotten away with it for over 20 years now, oiling about once a year, and it seems to do a fine job. But I would not use it in the lightly-loaded bearing surfaces that move at high speed. Unless you have a very good sense of bearing loads and lubrication, stick to the sewing machine oil throughout.
--
Ed Huntress



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Thanks Ed. I was trying to suggest something that might unstick the OP's stiff reverse lever. WD is something you can find anywhere easily, and he might have had some to hand. Lubrication wasn't the issue, initially anyway. Both you and Dave have kindly helped with many little queries I've posted here in the past. Keep it up!
Jordan
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Jordan wrote:

I can't resist asking the obvious question. did you change the foot plate to the wide hole when you were selecting other than straight stitch? I've done the same thing a couple of times when in a hurry and, as you said, smashed the needle.
Jim Chandler
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Jim Chandler wrote:

No, the wide hole is standard. It could be that the mechanical timing is out, but I doubt it and have lost interest in this machine anyway. Makes me think: should I avoid CNC metalworking machinery?
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Jordan wrote:

I learned a bit of sewing from my mom and sister, both very talented, and have been looking for a machine for patching jeans, etc. Found a beautiful Phaff with all the original accessories, manuals, and carrying case, for a mere $50.
Mom did some checking for me and it was made between the early 50's and early 60's, but has a low serial number, so likely it's older than I am.
I did a bit of research, and these sell for up to $750 depending on condition!
The sewing machine I really want is the antique Singer cobbler's sewing machine that has been in the family since the 1920's. Over the past few decades it's sewn up riding boots, leathers, and seat covers, and ought to last another century!
Jon
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I got a Singer 111W155 Walking Foot that was manufactured in 1957 according to the serial number. It will sew a lot of stuff, including leather, but I bought it to do canvas awnings and shade cloth material, which it will do without breaking a sweat. I have yet to break it out and try it. I do know an EXCELLENT sewing machine repairman in Las Vegas that has been fixing and redoing machines for thirty odd years. I will probably take it to him first just to be sure.
Problem is, I got the base and motor, and everything that came with it new, and it' a moose to move. And I probably paid too much for it ............ $250.
Looking forward to making Sunbrella house awnings all around this summer with square metal frames.
Steve
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    [ ... ]

    Interestingly enough, I use my little Singer 221B (folding portable) occasionally for sewing leather, and it works quite well for the task. (Granted, it is not particularly thick leather which I sew, but it is still leather. ;-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Was it LaSorda or Yogi who said, "It ain't bragging if you can do it"?
Steve
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