OT(?) Sheared lug nut stud

On Thu, 12 Dec 2013 09:56:08 -0500, "Jim Wilkins"


Look to a can of sand called a "sandblaster", sir. It's a spray-on but isn't a rattle can.
--
And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud
was more painful than the risk it took to blossom.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

replace them. Aluminum fatigues.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I took the wheel to a tire dealer who sanded the rim and rebalanced it for $25. He said your urethane paint suggestion was the right way, but no shop would go to that much trouble. (so don't ask) jsw
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 12 Dec 2013 17:32:08 -0500, "Jim Wilkins"

I used to do it for customers who were willing to pay the price. No guarantee on any other "fix".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

How'd we get onto the subject of military attire, anyway? And wouldn't those be too shiny for BDU work?
--
And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud
was more painful than the risk it took to blossom.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

You didn't watch "The Wizard of Oz"? The Tin Man?
--
Cheers,

John B.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

And damned uncomfortable. Sit on the icy ground with those and you'd instantly have chillyballs.
--
I merely took the energy it takes to pout and wrote some blues.
--Duke Ellington
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

    For the Air Farce Caadets at "Aluminum U.
-- pyotr filipivich "With Age comes Wisdom. Although more often, Age travels alone."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gunner Asch wrote:

I think they can be TIGged , but you will want to preheat them (take the bearings out first ...). See Ernies responses to my post in SEJW about when I fubarred the motorcycle part - I think the post was titled "Part Came Back" . Vee the crack , etc .
--
Snag



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gunner Asch wrote:

In that case get some repop rims and lace them to your hubs . Use new spokes .
--
Snag



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 11 Dec 2013 22:32:36 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Right, Elephant Snot! But that's absolutely -Hell- to remove.

We got snow last Friday and it still isn't gone. I'm missing days of work and it sucks the big one. <grumble, grumble> Work's hard enough to get in Winter here as it is.

As are most Scotchbrite pads, on the manual end.
--
I hate being bipolar ....... It's awesome!

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 11 Dec 2013 21:58:05 -0500, "Jim Wilkins"

If you want to pop the beads, try cleaning both the tire bead and rim, and then use some regular rubber cement. It's the only thing I've seen work on rusted beads.
--
I hate being bipolar ....... It's awesome!

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Not yet. I bought some old wheels for the tractor and demounted the tires to do that, but the electrical problem with my truck has consumed all my spare time this fall. I finally replaced the coils and ignition module and the check-engine light shut off, though the old module tests OK. The error codes didn't pin down the problem very closely.
When I bought the shop manuals for it I didn't notice the Engine/Emissions Diagnosis Manual, which applies to every engine and vehicle Ford made that year and was listed separately from the Ranger books. I got one from eBay this fall. The damn thing is 3-1/2" of onion-skin paper and hard to understand beyond the simplistic trouble-tree diagnostics meant for parts-swappers spending the customer's money. It didn't address the suspiciously large dwell angle I saw with a scope.
I now have a run list in the computer of every wire in the engine controls and custom-machined connector pins and test points to measure their resistance and observe that the signals match the graphs in the manual. Several connectors were corroded and at least one was open when I started. One of the ignition module screws broke off so I machined a drill jig to clean it out, then when I loosened the power steering pump that was in the way its rusty pressure line cracked. At least it failed in the driveway rather than on the road. The old truck keeps getting newer as I replace parts. jsw
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 12 Dec 2013 09:08:03 -0500, "Jim Wilkins"

So, engineers have finally figured a way to put the "shotgunning" into code for electronic troubleshooting, did they? It must have been those pesky used-car engineers, huh?

Hmm...

But you saved a lot of money buying it, right? <wink>
--
I hate being bipolar ....... It's awesome!

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The error codes didn't pin down the problem very

In 1970 I went into an Army course on repairing -very- complex electronics. They told us that there was a troubleshooting procedure but they had found that having repairmen memorize how the circuits work (in excruciating detail) was more effective, plus we wouldn't have to carry around and risk losing the manuals which were classified.
At that time the draft gave them a large enough pool of engineering grads to make it practical. After the draft ended they had to revert to board-swapping. The 40-week course gave them four graduates out of almost 100 starters. The others were allowed to enter less demanding courses. http://schroeder-family.us/military.htm
After I got out I went into the custom test equipment industry, specifically for the first generation of automotive engine control electronics and antilock brakes, and found out how hard it is to identify faults without adding excessive monitoring circuitry which has an equal chance of failing. You can detect a lot of problems easily by measuring the power supply current, for example, but an out-of-spec value doesn't tell you what caused it.

I figure the depreciation cost on a newer vehicle would be $1000 - $2000 a year, so I'm ahead if I spend less than that per year on an old one. Most years nothing breaks. jsw
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

    "Time to replace the truck. Now, do we do it all at once, or one part at a time?" -- pyotr filipivich "With Age comes Wisdom. Although more often, Age travels alone."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 12 Dec 2013 10:08:55 -0800, pyotr filipivich

All vehicles eventually reach the age and mileage where the costs are equal between the used car repairs + insurance and the new car + insurance. When it gets even close to even, I opt for a new car. I've only owned two new vehicles in my life, both trucks, and those have been my last two vehicles. I sure prefer driving new to used. Over the 17 years I drove the F-150, I put on 2 new sets of tires, one new set of brakes, 3 sets of spark plugs, a set of spark plug wires, a set of tie rods, a drag link (I set the toe myself, so total cost in parts was about $350 in the first 14 years), and, near the end, a rebuilt tranny ($1825.) It was considerably cheaper to own than any of my previous vehicles and amortized maintenance was <5 hours/yr. Having put $6k down, monthly payments were only $150 for the first 5 years. (oil changes are about the same for either, so I left them out)
It was also the first EFI vehicle I owned and I absolutely -adored- being able to go out on a very cold morning and just drive off. Carburetors, even when in perfect tune, are far too often a real bitch in the morning...and I tuned 'em for a living. I had to rebuild my Ford Ranch Wagon carb on the side of the road in the Mojave Desert once. I was a mile outside of the city of Mojave when it crapped out, so I troubleshot it, removed it, hiked into town, found a carb kit and 1.5gal carb dip, then asked a local resident if I could use his lawn hose to rinse my carb off. I was back on the road in under 2 hours. What a hassle, but I'm glad it was so easy to do.
So far in 6 years with the new Tundra, I've spent $4 on tailgate clip (last week when the gate wouldn't open), $3 on a turn signal bulb, $8 on a headlight bulb, and $65 on a battery. Total: $80. Nice! Oh, payments were $313/mo.
I might keep a used vehicle as a secondary, but my primary vehicle will always be new.
--
And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud
was more painful than the risk it took to blossom.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 12 Dec 2013 17:53:54 -0800, Larry Jaques

Your primary vehicle will always be new for one day - then it is a USED vehicle.
I buy 5 year old new vehicles (usually) - low mileage 5 year old vehicles for $6000-ish. I keep them (generally) about 10 years. The last few have cost me less than $6000 in lifetime repairs. My daughter and wife each cost me a front fender/bumper/header panel on the '88 Chrysler - would have cost at least as much to repair if the vehicle was new - and I sold it when it was 18 years old in good running condition and looking almost like new. Currently driving a 18 year old pickup with about 320,000km on it - over the last year I hnave spent NOTHING on repairs. I added AC and new tires/wheels - but not a single repair. Oil changes only for maintenance.
The last (and only) brand new vehicle I ever owned had more spent on it in the first 18 months than I've spent on any 2 of my used cars.. It was all warranty - but I was without the vehicle and had to put up with all the BS from the Chrysler dealer convincing them to fix it - and then having to redo half the work myself to make it right. They basically threw the parts into the truck, and I (re)did the repairs.
I've fixed a lot of cars on the road too - back when I drove REALLY used vehicles. 1969?VW 412 in Zambia, 1949 VW beetle in Zambia, 1967 Peugeot 204 in Zambia, - and the not-so-old 1990 Aerostar here in Canada (always broke down in Michigan) - and all of those together didn't cost me $1000 in parts/breakdown repairs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 12 Dec 2013 22:55:05 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

My mindset is a bit different from that. I see a vehicle as new until things start going wrong with it, usually a minimum of 5 years or 50k miles.

In my new car, most of that would have been under warranty and cost me nothing. I spent half my life repairing vehicles and the new car thing (no repair downtime/trouble) is a new and joyous thing for me, OK? ;) Besides, in the USA, where people commute, low-mileage 5y/o cars are very, very hard to find. Ask a car rental company why they rent 0-3 year old cars. Most cars here get 20k miles annually, so at 5 years, they're worn out and into the StartShovelingMoneyAtMe stage.

Yes, some used cars are unlike kept women and DON'T cost you an arm and a leg at every turn, but I haven't found that to be the norm. I'm happy to be able to do many of my own repairs, but I'm happier not having to do my own repairs. I like having clean fingernails today.

Well, if you buy Chrysler or GM vehicles, you'll have that experience. So solly. My old truck was built right there in your Canada.

That's a whole new world, isn't it? I remember those days, buying $100 vehicles, rebuilding the engines, and then being able to drive them. Fond memories.
But, today, gimme a new car/truck! I drive 6k miles a year, so they last a very long time with me.
--
And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud
was more painful than the risk it took to blossom.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 13 Dec 2013 06:17:42 -0800, Larry Jaques

As a said, I buy 5 year old "new" cars. 2003 Ford Taurus with 58000kn - thats less than 40,000 miles - for $6000.

Spent half my working life as a mechanic too.

Not easy to find here either, but they are around. I try to start looking for a new one before the old one gets too bad - that way I can still sell the old one for a half decent price and I'm never (well, almost never) in a position where I HAVE to buy a car.
Checked my records - the 88 New Yorker - not counting the body repairs, cost me $2800 in repairs over 140,000km and 12 years of ownership. That included rebuilding cyl heads and replacing transmission.. Add the body repairs -about $900 in parts total between the 2 incidents, and it was still a cheap car - considering I still got $1700 for it when I sold it. The '96 Mystique cost me $3000 over 12 years - only about 80,000km - including lower control arms, A./C reciever, Transmission repair , engine mount,and brakes.

For guys like you and I it's not hard to get ones that don't cost an arm and a leg to maintain because we (or at least I) know what to look for.
I've had2 cars over the last 30+ years I should never have bought. The 1985 LeBaron 2600 wagon - I bought it at night from a mechanic and took his word for what happened to it. It was a non-runner I bought for $1000 - and that was about $900 too much. I put an engine in it (rebuilt the old one - using only the original cyl head - it was that bad) and drove it 'till it wasn't solid enough to put on a hoist any more. Other than it being a $4000 pile of rust by the time I got it on the road, and it only lasting me 6 years before I sold it for parts, it didn't give me any trouble or expense.
The other one was the 1995 Pontiac Trans Sport I bought for scrap price with a blown engine and 275000km?. I put in an AC-Delco crate engine, and within 6 months a rebuilt trans as well, for a total investment of about $5000 - and that piece of crap nickelled and dimed me to death over the next 7 years or so. Never anything serious enough to make me mad enough to get rid of it - but it was just a piece of junk. When the engine let go on my daughter on the 401, it went straight to the scrap yard.
That's out of 25+ cars over the years.
The only "new" vehicle I owned was 1 1976 Dodge Ramcharger SE. It was a nice truck, but the dealer didn't PDI it properly and there was a never-ending list of things that needed fixing - some of which they finally fixed under warranty, some that I fixed - and a water leak that didn't get fixed untill I got rid of it 18 months later. I took a bigger loss on that vehicle than I've ever PAID for a vehicle since.
Now I let someone else pay the depreciation.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.