Metal rim vehicle tires

Letter Re: Basic Mechanics Skills and Knowing Vehicular Limitations <http://www.survivalblog.com/2013/09/letter-re-basic-mechanics-skills-and-knowing-vehicular-limitations.html
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James, Thank you for your contributions on SurvivalBlog. I read with interest the article on basic mechanical skills. Changing a tire can be a difficult process, last summer I had a blow out on a 100 degree day, found that changing a tire in the severe heat was a difficult task and for an older man, and possibly dangerous.
I decided to decide to find a workable solution for this problem. At first I tried the 12 volt DC impact wrenches but found them unsatisfactory. My solution was to take a 1,700 watt inverter that I placed in a tool box along with a set of jumper cables to hook it to the vehicle battery, I run an electric impact wrench off the inverter, this will allow me to activate the jack, remove and replace the lug nuts, and winch down the spare.
I also carry a 12 volt air compressor, some of the flat tire fixer in a can for punctures. in one of the boxes I also carry a tire repair kit. with these tools at my disposal I can handle tire emergencies.
Thanks, - Albert from Pennsylvania
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Wednesday, October 2, 2013
Letter Re: Basic Mechanics Skill and Knowing Vehicular Limitations
<http://www.survivalblog.com/2013/09/letter-re-basic-mechanics-skill-and-knowing-vehicular-limita
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Jim, If I might add my two cents to Albert's comments on Basic Mechanics Skill and Knowing Vehicular Limitations <http://www.survivalblog.com/2013/09/letter-re-basic-mechanics-skills-and-knowing-vehicular-limit
ations.html>: I was also inconvenienced with lug nuts being over-torqued. I bent the factory lug wrench in the process. My dear spouse would have never been able to loosen one, much less five lug nuts. So I vowed to never again be put in that position again. I made the assumption that the tire store torqued the lug nuts to factory specifications. They went far beyond that number. Apparently, many do.
My solution was far less high tech, EMP proof, and far less expensive: a24-Inch breaker bar <(Amazon.com product link shortened)89&creative25&crea
tiveASIN0062LNXK&linkCode=as2&tag=survivalcom-20>with a 1/2" drive for each vehicle. Add the correct socket, and a six inch extension and you will /never /struggle with that aspect of a tire change again. Get one for each vehicle and make it a permanent part of that vehicle's tool kit. - John T.
Chris notes: Harbor Freight often has breaker bars, for ten bucks on sale. Add a black impact socket set, and you're good to go. I've used mine more than once. For myself, and for others.
Basic Mechanics Skills and Knowing Vehicular Limitations Part 1, by "Zachary Taylor" <http://www.survivalblog.com/2013/09/basic-mechanics-skills-and-knowing-vehicular-limitations-part-1-by-zachary-taylor.html
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Basic mechanical knowledge and skills are something that any person who hopes to be successful in TEOTWAWKI
<http://www.SurvivalBlog.com/glossary.html#TEOTWAWKI
must have. I am not speaking just about vehicles, but vehicles are an excellent avenue to learn them. I can only talk with authority on my own past, but I know that the wealth of much of my knowledge comes from my extensive background in working on cars.
I won't claim that any of this post is going to be something that you have never read before. Heck, I am willing to bet that you heard much of this speech by a parent or grandfather the day you turned 16. I know I did. And, like almost everyone in this country, I rolled my eyes.
Before you roll your eyes, I propose that we conduct a quick experiment.
I want you to drive down your local heavily used state highway or interstate, say, the one you drive on every day to work. Within 5 miles, you will see a broken down car. Now, the reason for this breakdown can and will vary. It could be because of a catastrophic motor event or a wreck, but 90% of the time, it is there because the driver doesn't understand the basics of vehicle maintenance, the limits of the vehicle, or how to fix the vehicle in either event.
*Tire Maintenance* What's the most common automotive issue I see on American's roadways? Flat tires. Flat tires claim more roadside breakdowns than anything else. And not because the tire went flat, but because the owner either didn't have a spare, the spare was flat, or/most likely/ can't change the tire. Of these cars you see on the side of the road, how many have a jack underneath them, or a wheel propping the car up, and were simply abandoned mid-task? How many of them are just left there because they didn't have AAA? I have seen many a fine car left alone on the interstate for hours or days at a time.
Changing a tire is perhaps the simplest task a motorist can learn. And while it*is *simple, it teaches several lessons while also being a useful and money saving skill. These skills can save you valuable time and money in the every day world, while perhaps saving your life down the line. Changing a tire teaches many things including, but not limited to, the order of steps needed to complete an involved task, it teaches using a long handled tool to develop a moment to break loose lugs, balancing an unevenly weighed object, and even safety.
Now, for those of you who *can* change a flat tire, you realize that while it's an inconvenient, it isn't a big deal. For those of you who have practiced many times in your life, it is now a habit and can be easily fixed in a matter of minutes. Now, for those of you that can't ....what does a flat tire cost you? Mere minutes? Or hours? Do you have to call someone to come help you? What about their time? Does it cost you money? How is your stress level when you miss something important?
Yet, many times the problem is deeper than that. I remember as a teenager my grandmother/regularly/ telling me that my tires looked flat and that I needed to put air in them. But I always ignored her until one day the rim cut the tire down and I had a blowout. I remember driving to Auburn one time and I had a nasty blowout because a randomly 100 degree day caused the tire pressure to increase beyond the capability of the tire. In either case, simply paying attention to the tires would have raised an alarm and I would have rectified the situation. Not to mention that it would have saved me several hundred dollars. But, I wasn't in the habit of paying attention to my vehicle, neither by checking it out whenever I thought about it *or* paying attention to it's behavior on the road.
Here are many things that can tip you off to a tire issue, but all require the driver to be in tune to the vehicle:
* Uneven wear on the treads. If it's worn on the outside, the tire pressure has been too low. If it's worn in the center, the tire pressure is too high. * Does the car pull to one side or the other while driving? This could be a misalignment or one under inflated tire, which will also cause uneven wear. * Is there a "wobble"? If so, you could have tread separation and a blowout could be imminent.
Furthermore, great care should be taken while driving to limit the hazards to tires.
* Always avoid potholes. It may not seems deep or wide, and maybe you have run over thousands of them in your life. But it only takes the right one at the right angle and speed to cut down a tire. That's a real bad thing to have happen at 70. * Never run over objects on the road. IT may look like a piece of paper, but it could be a shard of metal or class ready to cut your tire. It may be a piece of plywood. Then again, it could be covered with nails.
Now, how about understanding the limitations of your tires? For example, do you know what the capabilities of a type of tire might be? Do you know if the tires on your current vehicle can be used to go off-road, if the need arises? Conversely, do you know just how long to expect a set of off- road tires to last on the street? In the case of a damaged tire, for example, a cut tire...do you know how to accurately gauge the remaining useful- ness of that tire? Or know how to extend it's life by lowering tire pressure and travel speed? In the event of a flat tire, do you know just how fast you can continue to drive on it if need be? Or how to know if you have traveled as far as the physical limits of the flat tire will allow? Do you know what the danger signs of a tire are and can you gauge the severity? For example, what it means when you see the steel belts sticking out of a tire? Do you know what the effective stopping distance in your car is in all weather conditions? Specifically, do you know the conditions of your tires and how they might perform in the rain? In all cases, it requires the driver to be in tune with their vehicle, which in this age of automation and luxury, makes it easy for people to ignore all these important signs.
So, many of you are asking just how this might save your life in TEOTWAWKI. Let's talk about one of my posts from the 5 Stages of Preparedness. Specifically, Stage 1: The Immediate <http://best5zach.blogspot.com/2012/11/the-5-stages-of-preparedness-part-1.html . Let's say you have identified a major threat to all cities, specifically the one you live in. While it is important to always take care of your vehicle for your everyday life, it could become vital to your survival.
Specifically, if you have to get out of Dodge. You will have so many other things on your mind that you don't need to be worried about if your vehicle will get you where you need to go. Getting into habits such as checking tire conditions and pressure will go a long way to ensuring that at least the tires of your vehicle will hold up. And, while you are on the go, you have to take care that you limit putting it in circumstances that it might fail you. Paying attention to driving conditions, specifically on the road, may save you minutes, hours, or even a dangerous circumstance that may claim others. For example, if almost everyone is trying to escape a city, the roadways will undoubtedly be extremely busy. There will be wrecks. There will be objects on the road. Slowing down, paying attention, and limiting the potential for cutting down you tires may save you when it may doom others. What if it's raining? Getting out *is *the priority, but knowing the effective stopping distance of your tires due to their physical condition could save you from a costly wreck.
But things happen. Sometimes there are forces you can't control. What will you do then? Could you change a tire if you had to? More importantly, can you do it quickly and safely? Will it be such a habit that you can pay attention to your surroundings? What if you didn't already have a vehicle and you needed one. You find one on the side of the road, abandoned. Keys still in it. But the owner couldn't figure out how to use a jack. With 5 minutes work, you have secured potentially life saving transportation. We talked about understanding the limitations of the tire. Let's say that you know there is a potential problem developing that you have identified. You also know that stopping is not a possibility. Understanding the limitations of the tires may allow you to continue your path. While it may not be the optimum speed or method, it may be enough to put those crucial miles behind you.
What does it take to learn this skill? Just time. Luckily for you, your car manufacturer gave you all the tools you would need. I am willing to bet that there are instructions on the back of the cover panel to the secret compartment that houses the jack and the breaker bar in the trunk of your car. So, take some time on a Saturday afternoon to find out where that compartment is. Pull the cover off, grab the tools, and follow the directions. I promise that even the slowest of you will only need to change the tire 3 times before you will have it down. Even if you don't believe in TEOTWAWKI, you have to believe in saving time and money. How about keeping you from walking down an interstate late one night to find a gas station? I can't think of anything more scary for a woman than the thought of having to start walking down the street to find help.
Indirectly, there is a lot of things a person can gain from learning the basics of tire maintenance. How about the money and time that you can save from simply being in tune with your vehicle by getting in the habit of paying attention to the little things. No one likes buying tires. That's a fact. Identifying potential problems like noticing the vehicle pulling to one side can save money by having it fixed early. Maintaining the proper air pressure can maximize tire life, saving you money. Simply knowing how to change a tire can save you hours and stress. What about the things you can learn indirectly? Off the top of my head, I think about the cause and effect of air temperature and pressure. How about understanding mechanical properties and friction? If the tire is flat, the surface area increases, so the drag increases causing the car to pull to one side. How about using a breaker bar to overcome your own physical limitations of force? I know it all sounds simplistic to many of you. But I am not writing for those of you that understand. The average American knows /virtually nothing/ about hands-on mechanical work of any kind. They have to learn it by living it. I can't think of a better way to learn than to do so while discovering a valuable skill that has definite uses in your daily life and potential use to save it.
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Carry a long breaker bar and appropriate socket, and free the lugnut by jacking up the handle end.
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On 10/2/2013 12:38 PM, Jim Wilkins wrote:

Good one. I do carry a breaker bar. Sorry, all, didn't know that was going to turn out to be 366 lines. Ouch!
--
.
Christopher A. Young
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On 10/2/2013 12:38 PM, Jim Wilkins wrote:

Yes, the breaker bar is excellent idea. I have one in my vehicle.
I've heard various opinions. Should one lube the threads of the lugs? Some people do, others say never. http://www.rd.com/slideshows/13-amazing-uses-for-wd-40/?v=print And, would one use WD?
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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My Ford's manual says no, and they haven't corroded without it in 23 years.
jsw
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On Thu, 3 Oct 2013 12:14:37 -0400

I use 20 or 30 weight oil. Nothing special, just what ever cheap stuff I happen to have in the general lube can. My trucks a 1982 4x4. Never had a nut come loose on its own or even seem loose when removed. I always finish torquing them with my own T-wrench by hand. Torque spec is different though compared to the non-lubed spec...
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
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On 10/3/2013 9:14 AM, Jim Wilkins wrote:

my car (not a ford) emphasizes in the owner's manual the importance of anti-seize on the lug nut threads and mating surface, and the avoidance of impact wrench.
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A/S isn't exactly a lube, and I've used it on lugnuts after having to replace some studs on client vehicles back in the day. (Only on the thread, never on the cone of the nut which interfaces with the wheel.)
Ever had a locking magnut strip and seize? They're a flaming royal ass -bitch- to remove.
--
I hate being bipolar ....... It's awesome!

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On Fri, 04 Oct 2013 05:27:19 -0700, Larry Jaques

Cone seat nuts are a pain - but not terribly bad. You want to try to remove the old mag nuts that had the flange that fit into the hole, with a flat washer between the nut and the rim. When one of those seized into the rim it was a LOT more difficult to remove than one that seised to the threads. Seized to the threads a strong guy with a good wrench could twist off the stud. Not going to happen if it is seized into the rim!!!
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On Fri, 04 Oct 2013 22:55:57 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

True. I was referring to the locks which spun when locked. When they failed, they wouldn't connect to the inner nut.
--
I hate being bipolar ....... It's awesome!

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On 10/4/2013 8:24 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

I had someone try to steal a wheel with that kind of lock using a slide hammer - they broke the slide hammer in the lock (good for the lock) - I cut the hardened steel shell with a diamond saw
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On 10/4/2013 10:55 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The new Buick and ohter GM with the cone pointed lugs, and aluminum rims. Miserable combination of events. When those sieze, it's rough.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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wrote:

Both of my vehicles have aluminum wheels with conical lugnut seats, and New England salts the roads heavily. Perhaps I haven't had trouble with them because every fall I pull the wheels to check the brakes, then torque the nuts to spec. jsw
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On 10/5/2013 7:49 AM, Jim Wilkins wrote:

Please be sure to retorque, after two days driving. That's what the Dune tire does (well, they say 50 miles). Aluminum rims tend to loosen. I had a wheel wobble and fall off (literally so) a couple weeks ago. A mechanic and I both thought it was the other wheel, so I didn't pop the cover and check the lugs.
I'm a bit more OCD about checking lug torque, now.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On Sat, 05 Oct 2013 08:34:14 -0400, Stormin Mormon

If they are PROPERLY torqued an aluminum rim will NOT loosen. Nor will a good steel rim with conical nuts. The only nuts that loosen are ones that are not PROPERLY torqued or the steel rims are rusty.
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wrote:

Well, it is good advice if the nut holding the air wrench installs and fully tightens them one at a time. jsw
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On Sat, 05 Oct 2013 15:07:29 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

And a quick swipe of a battery terminal brush cleans the rust off those lug holes quickly and thoroughly.
--
I hate being bipolar ....... It's awesome!

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On 10/5/2013 3:07 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

ACTUALLY, as I noted, a couple weeks AGO I did have a wheel FALL OFF. It was PROPERLY tightene, using a Harbor Freight TORQUE WRENCH and set to the manufacturers SPEC. I had negleced the "fifty miles later" recheck, but I'm sure it was PROPERLY torqued on the day I DID THE WORK.     
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On Sun, 06 Oct 2013 07:59:48 -0400, Stormin Mormon

There is a possibility..small..but possible..that kids/someone loosened your lug nuts.
I caught 2 kids one night going down a street with a lug wrench loosening drivers front lug nuts on every truck that their wrench would fit. The judge put them in juvenile hall until they were 21 on multiple cases of attempted murder. There had been a rash of drivers side front tires coming off..and one man was badly badly hurt and another one was crippled for years as a result when the lug nut came off and that front tire came off, suddenly drifting that truck into the path of an oncoming tanker..
Late 1970s..very early 80s as I recall. Both were no older than 15-16. Both were as dumb as a bag of coon shit. Inbred little bastards.

"
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On Sun, 06 Oct 2013 07:59:48 -0400, Stormin Mormon

In 46 years, over half spent working as a mechanic, I have never seen a "properly touqued" wheel loosen off enough to lose a wheel. I've seen studs break, I've seen rims break, and I've seen wheels that were not "properly torqued" come loose. "properly torqued" does not mean just torqued to the proper spec with a torque wrench. It means torqued in the proper order to be 100% certain the rim is centered and the conical nuts are properly seated in the rim seats so the nuts cannot shift, decreasing the effective torque on the nuts. Pull basically finger tight, then torque in skip-mode, one nut, then the one roughly opposite it, then the one between them - etc, to about 1/4 torque - then follow the sequence again to about half torque, then up to final torque. There is no physical way they can lose torque if they are "properly torqued" and the wheel is "properly installed" - which means everything is reasonably clean and not rusted severely, and it goes together without forcing anything.
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