oxy/acetylene: difference between brazing/welding tip?

I have an old Smith torch which seems to be in fine condition except a bit of
the nickel plating has worn through. It has 2 welding tips and a cutting torch
attachment which uses the old-style threaded cutting torch tips. I am getting
ready to sell it locally, and I'm anticipating questions. I have never done any
brazing and my gas welding experience adds up to minutes, not years, so I really
don't know much about this stuff. What's the difference between a welding tip
and a brazing tip?
By the way, I found out something. On a regulator, when the secondary pressure
slowly creeps up, I was told it is always a bad seat. I also have a pair of old
Smith regulators, and the oxygen reg had this creep. The torch repair place said
they'd rebuild it, that it's massively worth it since when this was made it was
Smith's top of the line regulator, but that it was designed to have a
user-replaceable seat. Even has a little place where you unscrew a cap and lo
and behold there are 2 extra seats! I was able to fix my own seat and now this
regulator set works perfectly again. Really nice too, only a little dirty. I'm
writing this about replacing the regulator seat because I believe I remember
recently reading where someone had this exact problem.
Grant Erwin
Kirkland, Washington
Reply to
Grant Erwin
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"Grant Erwin" wrote: (clip) What's the difference between a welding tip and a brazing tip? (clip) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ None. Just use a tip that produces the right amount of heat for the job.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
FYI The worst thing you can do with regulars is leave them set and simply turn off the high pressure valve on the tank. When you turn on the tank with the pressures already set the little regulator valve is hammered closed with such force that it damages the seat. Smith are good quality. Randy
I have an old Smith torch which seems to be in fine condition except a bit of the nickel plating has worn through. It has 2 welding tips and a cutting torch attachment which uses the old-style threaded cutting torch tips. I am getting ready to sell it locally, and I'm anticipating questions. I have never done any brazing and my gas welding experience adds up to minutes, not years, so I really don't know much about this stuff. What's the difference between a welding tip and a brazing tip?
By the way, I found out something. On a regulator, when the secondary pressure slowly creeps up, I was told it is always a bad seat. I also have a pair of old Smith regulators, and the oxygen reg had this creep. The torch repair place said they'd rebuild it, that it's massively worth it since when this was made it was Smith's top of the line regulator, but that it was designed to have a user-replaceable seat. Even has a little place where you unscrew a cap and lo and behold there are 2 extra seats! I was able to fix my own seat and now this regulator set works perfectly again. Really nice too, only a little dirty. I'm writing this about replacing the regulator seat because I believe I remember recently reading where someone had this exact problem.
Grant Erwin Kirkland, Washington
Reply to
R. Zimmerman
"R. Zimmerman" wrote in news:3ZE7f.301843$1i.137829@pd7tw2no:
Randy, could you please expand on this statement with the correct procedure to use. I never realized that about shutting down the tanks.
granpaw
Reply to
granpaw
No expansion needed . Just turn the handle until the outlet pressure is zero - you'll need to open the valves on the torch body too ... Do it before or after you close the tank valve , just remember to do it . Your regulators will thank you !
Reply to
Snag
I've had a set of Airco stuff to about 30 years... and never problems. When finished welding.... 1. Turn off both tank valves. 2. Open Acet torch valve. 3. Bleed off pressure. 4. Close Acet torch valve. 5. Back off Acet regulator handle until "free wheeling" 6. Open Oxy torch valve 7. Bleed off pressure. 8. Close Oxy torch valve. 9. Back off Oxy regulator handle until "free wheeling". This takes pressure off everything and has been working well for me for years. HTH Ken.
Reply to
Ken Sterling
And that is why Ken still has a good set of torches after thirty years. I have given up at work trying to do this. Average life of a set of regulators I would guess is around two years. While I am wearing the "Grumpy Old Fart" hat. The hand valves should be closed LIGHTLY. People tend to be ham fisted and then whine and complain because their hand valves will not seal. Randy
I've had a set of Airco stuff to about 30 years... and never problems. When finished welding.... 1. Turn off both tank valves. 2. Open Acet torch valve. 3. Bleed off pressure. 4. Close Acet torch valve. 5. Back off Acet regulator handle until "free wheeling" 6. Open Oxy torch valve 7. Bleed off pressure. 8. Close Oxy torch valve. 9. Back off Oxy regulator handle until "free wheeling". This takes pressure off everything and has been working well for me for years. HTH Ken.
Reply to
R. Zimmerman
Thanks for the info. maybe now my torches will last longer than me. granpaw
Reply to
granpaw

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