pantograph plans or hints?

I'd like to make a pantograh, so I can duplicate some flat items with
complex contours. Any hints/tips on making one, or is it as
straightforward as it looks? I only need X and Y, not Z.
Reply to
Dave Hinz
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Heck, Dave, you can buy one for less than $1/lb.
- - Rex Burkheimer
Dave H> I'd like to make a pantograh, so I can duplicate some flat items with
Reply to
Rex B
Really... Anyone got one in the Wisconsin-ish area? I suppose these are considered somewhat obsolete since the production shops will be using CNC for complex shapes? It'll fit right in to my basement shop, though; nothing newer than (hmmm) 1960's technology, I think.
Dave "not complaining, mind you" Hinz
Reply to
Dave Hinz
They go by on ebay River regularly, often with no bids because they state "Local pickup only". I th0ought long and hard about one here in Ft Worth that would have gone for $350 with all the letters. It's probably still there.
Rex
Reply to
Rex B
I saw a pantograph in CNC mode - Human holding both pointer in trace and the plasma torch out further. I think it was for the 'movie'.
The table was 8 x 20 from what it looked - nice web design and this big pantograph that scaled up the small model into metal.
In what I have used in the past - for drawing - was two V's that had axis bolts in the vertex. Running along each arm are equally spaced holes. Both V's have same spacing on the same V but ours was on both V's. Then once made, pins have to be made - sliding fit for these holes. The V's are then mated creating a dual W of sorts - a V point up an one down. The ratio between the one pair to the other pair determines the scale.
Not bad to make - and can be custom fit to any table.
Maritn
Martin Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net NRA LOH & Endowment Member NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member
Dave H>
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
So what you are talking about is a Label or sign maker pantograph.
I'd think the sign shops might have one in a corner - the ones that do company name and other engraving.
Martin Martin Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net NRA LOH & Endowment Member NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member
Rex B wrote:
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
Ah...yes, that would do quite well. Funny; I've worked on one of those, and have apparenlty mentally reinvented it without knowing why. Yes, that's exactly what I need.
Reply to
Dave Hinz
photocopy the part.
place the photocopy face down on the material to be used.
use an iron with the steam turned off and about the cotton setting and iron down the photocopy. this will melt and transfer some of the toner down on to the piece of material.
done well you get a perfect image of the linework on the piece of material.
Stealth Pilot
Reply to
Stealth Pilot
I've heard that you can buy printer paper for photocopiers or laser printers, made specifically for doing iron-on transfers, which work even better. Haven't tried it yet.
That's not the problem, the "cutting all the odd angles and curves without once screwing up or it'll ruin the piece" is the problem.
Reply to
Dave Hinz
Most awards and trophy shops have gone to cnc and likely have one or two just collecting dust. call around
Reply to
daniel peterman

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