Penetrating Oils

I was captivated by the string of discussions on penetrating oils. I grew up with my dad using WD-40 on our rusty projects. We would spray
something down and go in the house and have a cup of coffee, then come back out and whatever we were working on either gave up, or we did. Now I'm teaching myself to work on delicate, close tolerance machinery that is often bound up by rust, solidified old oils, or just dry (I guess). I started with, WD-40, but with really rusty parts tried BP Blaster? (Which was not so good in tight quarters) I tried brake fluid, and now I see I wasn't doing that right. Went to REM oil for guns, which has been good for dry or gummy situations, now I am playing with PAL oils. These were designed by a guy who grew up on right on the salty coast, dealing with lots of rust. He has designed several oils for different applications. I have used Marine Pal and it is pretty amazing. I am going to use Machine Pal to follow up with a lubricant. Maybe it is pricey for large applications. I know that folks who have used it are now buying it by the gallon. There is a website: http://users/techline.com/palfac if that doesn't work just try the product name. I'm also trying the Lugbuster Pal that is supposed to be effective on even muffler and exhaust hardware. And I believe for those that care it is more environmentally friendly than some of the alternatives mentioned. Casey
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well, all's I can say is, if yer penetrating oil cain't drop flies right out of yer shop airspace, it's already got Stee-rike One. What would "tight quarters" have to do w/ 'Blaster's effectiveness??
WD-40 is for housewives.
--
------
Mr. P.V.'d (formerly Droll Troll), Yonkers, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Oh, yeah, spam....
--
------
Mr. P.V.'d (formerly Droll Troll), Yonkers, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Excellent find. Unfortunately, after I bought a case of each, Kroil, PB blaster. I didn't know they still made liquid wrench!! It also has much greater anti-rust properties than WD 40.
I'm surprised by some of the results, tho.
I didn't think WD 40 would have any effect at all. And I certainly wouldna thought it was so close to PB.
Shouldn't they have tested Coke and Pepsi??
Also, I wonder how a penetrating ranks as a lite SAE 5-10 lubricating oil?
--
EA





>
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 22 Dec 2012 05:59:04 -0500, "Existential Angst"

WD has kerosene and Stodart Solution..so its not a lubricant in the slightest..it only has some veggy oil.
Kroil is pretty darned good, but the ATF/Acetone is probably the best.
Its supposed to cause bladder damage because of the acetone fumes..what litle there are.
Gunner
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/22/2012 15:54, Gunner wrote:

One possibility is also penetrating liquid used for liquid penetrant testing.. It is VERY good at going through cracks etc.. I've used it for getting some stuck things apart. The bright red/purple colour is a minus though.. :)
The acetone+ATF is a nice idea!

Well, I clean my hands with acetone after painting with non-water soluble paint.. I wouldn't worry about some rare exposure to acetone. After all, there is some acetone naturally in human body, and larger amounts when in ketogenic diet..
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Found this article on the web. http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/general/ot-penetrating-oil-196347/ I've recently found Castle Thrust is good penetrant. I needed to adjust the headlights on my truck, which had been aimed too high. Just got the truck, used. I tried several sprays, none loosened the adjuster. Castle Thrust did the job.
I guess different products for different jobs.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

One possibility is also penetrating liquid used for liquid penetrant testing.. It is VERY good at going through cracks etc.. I've used it for getting some stuck things apart. The bright red/purple colour is a minus though.. :)
The acetone+ATF is a nice idea!

Well, I clean my hands with acetone after painting with non-water soluble paint.. I wouldn't worry about some rare exposure to acetone. After all, there is some acetone naturally in human body, and larger amounts when in ketogenic diet..
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
says...

Just remember to keep the ATF/Acetone tightly capped when not in use, or pretty soon it will just be ATF again.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'd like a lube to coat threads on caps for refrigeration fittings. These will be warm, cold, wet, dry, and made of steel. They tend to rust on. I've tried differend sprays which all disappear rapidly. Recently been trying marine grease.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 22 Dec 2012 18:33:28 +0200, Kristian Ukkonen

Piva Soumi!
Gunner, half Finn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


I tried making the ATF-Acetone stuff last week and couldn't get it to dissolve into each other. Vigorous shaking produced a mixture which quickly separated back into 2 liquids, ATF on the bottom. Anyone have an idea what the problem is? Art
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/24/2012 6:11 PM, Artemus wrote:

I have not tried mixing them but atf is mostly oil and acetone is a highly polar compound. It's like mixing oil and water.
For Gunner, all I use is Ed's Red. I have a batch for copper fouling that I added a little amine epoxy curing agent to but don't know how effective it might be as I seldom have a copper fouling problem in my pistols.
Lanolin was somewhat hard to find in the drug store but turns out that it is used as a nipple cream for nursing mothers and I think I found it in the baby section.
Another note is that acetone does not attack polyethylene. When I worked in the lab we used to use plastic squeeze bottles with acetone for rinsing and cleaning glassware. Hot oils will attack polyethylene as would kerosene and other hydrocarbons.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Artemus wrote:

That is because they are not compatible. Never have been. You can get them to emulsify if you put them in something like a blender but they will start to break as soon as agitation stops.
--
Steve W.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Nope. In Eds Red..it mixes just fine
Gunner
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    [ ... ]

    Are there not two different types of ATF -- just like there are two different types of hydraulic brake fluid?
    Which type of ATF is preferred for this mix?
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Remove oil spill source from e-mail
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DoN. Nichols wrote:

There are several and I don't know how compatible they are. I'd stick with Dexron III or IV.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Humm...very very good question. Last batch I made up, I dumped in a quart of Dexron II..the cheapest I could find.
Couldnt tell any difference between the prior batch..about 15 yrs ago.
Gunner
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Dexron - not Mercon
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

A few years ago, I needed a penetrant. The only thing I had immediately available was straight lacquer thinner.
It worked far better than I expected!
BTW, lacquer thinner works wonders on most automotive spooge. It rip's off sludge and oil varnish almost instantly.
It's not good for you though; skin contact & inhalation need to be avoided at all costs. It's also very volatile & extremely flammable. in other words, dangerous stuff.
Erik
PS, For the BBQ, I have one of those chimney starter things. Instead of paper, I have a little stainless container in which goes a couple of ounces of charcoal lighter fluid. I light it, and carefully set the coal filled chimney over it. Works great![1] A while back, I was out of lighter fluid, and substituted lacquer thinner. It was fine at first, but after about 45 seconds, started producing this loathsome, horrible smelling, choking dense back smoke that immediately enveloped my neighbor's house, and blew in through their open windows. I immediately pulled off the chimney and covered the now boiling container to extinguish... but the damage was done. They said it took days to air out the reeking chemical stench. It was very embarrassing to say the least... I think they're still a little stewed, and rightfully so.
[1] Works great yes, but hazardous to say the least. Should that container ever get knocked over, I have flaming lighter fluid running everywhere. It's not really an issue where I do it even if I have a spill, but would never consider using the method around kids, pets, morons or anyone who might try it on their own... and whole heatedly do not recommend anyone try it.
Erik
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

re are

Lacquer thinner has a bunch of different solvents in it, including aromatics, exact composition depends on evaporation speed. But xylene, benzene and various subsitution products of same will all burn with a whole lot of choking smoke. Great for a smudgepot, not so great for fire starting. I'd only use it for a solvent, myself. If I HAD to use something off the solvent shelf for lighting charcoal, I'd grab the naptha can.
Stan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.