Pictures of a dividing head


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Seems to be in good shape. Weighs about 120 lbs. I may use it very
soon if my worst fears are right and I need to make a certain gear.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus7829
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That chuck key in the chuck made me cringe. Back in my votech days a fella left the key in the lathe chuck like that, then turned the lathe on. There was a hole in the cement block wall. I guess it don't matter on a dividing head, but NEVER leave a chuck key in a lathe chuck.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
Why does the tail stock appear to be of a different height then the 4 jaw chuck?
Reply to
jbslocum
Maybe it's adjustable.
I have a worse situation in that I got a tailstock off ebay for my Hardinge dividing head, then discovered that the Hardinge dividing head and Hardinge collet indexers use tailstocks with different center heights. Naturally I got the wrong one. Oh, well, someday I'll find the correct one. Not an issue until I relocated and set the shop back up.
Pete Keillor
Reply to
Pete Keillor
Just make a suitable spacer block to raise whichever is lower up to match.
Reply to
Pete C.
i have learned that by now, not the hard way though
Reply to
Ignoramus11962
it is.
I had that happen a few times, fortunately it sholh br easy to sell
** Sent from my Google phone ** I apologize for any typos **
Reply to
Ignoramus11962
Looks like a nice one. 40:1 ratio, based on the chart (in particular, to cut 40 teeth, you use any hole circle, and turn one full turn for each indexing.
Do you have all three hole plates? You will need them to produce any division on the charts.
Good luck DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
I had the same initial reaction -- but then reasoned that in a dividing head, there was no way you could spin it fast enough to throw the key.
I must admit -- this is the first time I have seen one with a 4-jaw independent chuck. Mine came with a 3-jaw chuck, and a T-bar center designed to properly drive a dog to turn the gear blank or whatever.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
The head can be angled, and may be at some angle other than parallel to the table at present.
Ouch! If you are lucky, the tailstock you got is lower than you need, and you can make a riser block to go between it and the table.
Good luck, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
Nope, about 1/2" too high. It'll be relatively easy to sell it. It's finding the right one that's hard.
Pete Keillor
Reply to
Pete Keillor
I have only one plate (but want to make the missing ones). I am pretty sure that on my plate there is a number divisible by 3.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus11962
4 jaw, is more hassle, but more versatility as well, such as ability t hold rectangular objects. I will try to find a three jaw chuck, however.
The spindle is threaded, the ID of the chuck's thread is 2.15 inches, and 8 TPI.
I will later try to ask what sort of chuck I would look for on ebay. I have a South Bend chuck that has the same internal diameter, but is 6 TPI and does not thread on.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus11962
====== Looks like a nice piece of gear.
If you need a refresher on gear cutting in the home shop with work arounds see
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has good review on gear nomenclature including DP and module. also see
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For information on dividing heads see
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{see No.1128}
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?id=d0rOAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA98&lpg=PA98&dq=manuals+OR+operation+OR+theory+%22dividing+heads%22&source=bl&ots=utCU8djJl4&sig=sXBl-DYVcgc7LPp4UD-HgFFIcCw&hl=en&ei=KB2jSvXgEYH7nAfH98nOBQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=16#v=onepage&q=manuals%20OR%20operation%20OR%20theory%20%22dividing%20heads%22&f=false Hope this is useful.
Unka' George [George McDuffee] ------------------------------------------- He that will not apply new remedies, must expect new evils: for Time is the greatest innovator: and if Time, of course, alter things to the worse, and wisdom and counsel shall not alter them to the better, what shall be the end?
Francis Bacon (1561-1626), English philosopher, essayist, statesman. Essays, "Of Innovations" (1597-1625).
Reply to
F. George McDuffee
Unka, I bought one of Lindsay's books already. I am afraid (do not really want to happen) that soon i will need to cut a gear, so I am gettting prepared.
i
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Also has good review on gear nomenclature including DP and
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Reply to
Ignoramus11962
O.K. Do you need the order in which the holes are present on a typical set of plates? My head is also a 40:1 head, so it will give a good starting point.
Good Luck, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
Or -- as someone else suggested -- make a riser block for the dividing head itself.
Good Luck, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
========= Regular straight cut gears are not hard to cut, assuming reasonable size for the machines you have. The biggest problem is the cutter, and you can hand grind the tool with some care to an existing gear that is close in tooth count that will produce a functional gear for most uses.
see
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Helical, miter, etc. are another story, but Law in his book shows how to do this. {looks like a royal PITA}
Free 30 page PDF
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free info
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You can also buy the cutters and arbors, but these are expensive, and hard to locate in the US. Several cutter and arbor sets available on UK web sites however. Be careful that you get the correct tooth form [involute or cycloid] as the several of the UK suppliers have both. some sample sites [ be setting down when you look at the prices]
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?page=175
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how to CDs available
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{scroll down or search for "gear"}
What kind of gear, material, tooth count and what PD or module are you going to need?
Let the group know how you make out.
Unka' George [George McDuffee] ------------------------------------------- He that will not apply new remedies, must expect new evils: for Time is the greatest innovator: and if Time, of course, alter things to the worse, and wisdom and counsel shall not alter them to the better, what shall be the end?
Francis Bacon (1561-1626), English philosopher, essayist, statesman. Essays, "Of Innovations" (1597-1625).
Reply to
F. George McDuffee
Iggy,
What are the dimensions on your plates. I have a 49,47,43,41,39,37 hole plate laying around. It is 5" dia, 1.125 bore, .25" thick 3 mounting holes on a 1.625" dia circle countersunk for #8s.
Paul K. Dickman
Reply to
Paul K. Dickman
I would love to get that info, indeed. Possibly different sets have different counts. Let me know, this would be great. I will buy 6" 1/2" thick disks at mcmaster and will drill them.
This brings up another question, that I would probably ask in a different thread. The thinnest steel round disks at McMaster are 1/2" thick.
I will need to drill several hundred holes in 1/2" steel disks, and I would much prefer to do that in one operation, as opposed to starting holes with a center drill and then drilling 1/8" holes.
To that end, I looked up screw machine drills at McMaster, hoping that they are short enough to not wander without center drilling. It would seem that the 1/8" screw machine drills can drill 0.68" holes, so they ought to be enough for drilling 1/2" plate.
I may try to use a screw machine length carbide drill, so that I would not need to worry about lubrication and drill at high speed so as to waste less time. Do you think that item 27515A11 would be able to drill steel without center drilling? (in a Bridgeport)
i
Reply to
Ignoramus11113

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