Plans for 2"x72" Knife Grinder/Sander Released for sale No Welding required

No Weld Grinder/Sander Plans (NWGS)
By Tracy Mickley
Midwest Knifemakers Supply, LLC
www.midwestknifemakers.com

These printed plans are for a 2” x 72” belt grinder or sander. The construction requires no welding, no machining, no lathe work, no precision thread tapping, no special tools.
These are paper plans and will be mailed to you via US First Class Mail upon purchase.
Just to be sure, this is not for an actual grinder or any part of grinder. This listing is for plans that you can use to construct your own grinder/sander using your materials.
This grinder design uses tool arms to change from a contact wheel to a flat platen to a small wheel to slack belt attachment in seconds. If you have a KMG grinder from Beaumont Metals already, you can use the tools from that grinder in your NWGS.
Features:
No Welding needed! No Lathe needed! No Machining or Mill work needed! 15 pages of clear CAD drawings with measurements and materials list on each drawing. Master materials list. Quick change tool arms allow multiple attachments to be changed in seconds. Plans include tool arms for: Flat Platen, Tool Table Rest, Slack Belt, Contact Wheel. Very low cost materials used in the construction. Rock solid and vibration free. Tool Table Rest design allows tool rest to be used with any attachment. Flexible design allows different belt lengths to be used besides 2” x 72”. No precision thread tapping required. Design is a no weld design but the grinder can easily be welded if you desire. Flexible, robust design allows you to make changes to customize your grinder/sander to your own needs. If you make tapered tangs on your knives or have wanted to, simply stretch the plans and make a 15” flat platen with ease. Can use KMG tool bar arms. Hundreds of hours of R&D and multiple proto-type testing went into the design of this very capable grinder/sander. Web support with additional pictures and ideas for other attachments via www.midwestkms.com Suitable for use in grinding metal and sanding wood. In case you are wondering, when you are working with metal, the machine is called a grinder, when you are working with wood, the machine is called a sander. 2”x72” abrasive belts are one of the most common and competitively priced sizes of belts. Compare prices on this size belt to any other. If you are using a smaller size grinder/sander. The money you save using 2” x 72” belts will pay for this machine in no time flat. 2” x 72” belts have more types of belts available for them than any other size belt. It’s no wonder that knife makers and custom wood workers have settled on this size of grinder/sander.
The printed assembly manual contains:
15 pages of detailed CAD drawings with measurements and materials lists on each drawing. You could easily build the entire NWGS from these CAD drawings.
In addition to the CAD drawings, there is a 28 page construction manual with:
Clear BW pictures of various parts of the grinder for visual reference during construction. Nothing tells it better than a picture!
5 pages of assistance in selecting the proper motor for your grinder. Note: We do not provide wiring diagrams or support for hooking up or wiring your motors. There are simply too many variations to do that. If you don’t know how to wire a motor, buy it from a reputable motor shop and they will show you in about 5 minutes how to wire it up.
3 pages of information on abrasives including a conversion chart for the different technical standards of abrasives.
2 pages of supply sources – every part has multiple supplier sources but nearly every single part can be purchased locally.
Tools Required:
A metal band saw is very helpful as is a drill press. If you don’t have a band saw, you can get the heavier material cut to size for a nominal charge (usually around $2 to $3 a cut after the first cut) from the metal supplier. A hand hack saw can handle most of the cuts. If you don’t have a drill press, you can use a variable speed hand drill.
A carpenters square. A tape measure, a scribe point, assorted drill bits (actually just 4 drill bits – 1/8”, 5/16”, 3/8” and ½”), a 3/8”-16 tap and tap wrench. A Unibit™ (step drill bit) works exceptionally well in this project as a supplement to your regular drill bits or even in place of them. Cutting/tapping lubricant (oil will work but cutting lubricant works better). A rotary tool such as a Dremmel™ tool (or hand file to) cut 2ea 1” x 3/16” key way slots. Hand wrench or adjustable wrenches to tighten bolts.
You can see the tools required are very modest and simple.
the plans are available at: www.midwestknifemakers.com
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

What fun is that?
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It's a Linux world....well, it oughta be.
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Paul wrote:

Indeed! Even having plans takes away most of the fun. Bob
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