Plasma cutter art

Have my new Hypertherm up and running, and I'm anxious to cut some
patterns out. How do the plasma cutter artists enlarge the things they
find (like leaves) to make patterns that can be traced out then cut?
Over-head projector is the only thing that comes to mind right off,
any other ideas? How do I scan in a flatbed then enlarge it?
Ronnie
Reply to
Ronnie Lyons, Meridian, Idaho
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try this link:
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need one too.
walt
Reply to
wallster
On 22 Jun 2004 13:01:04 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Ronnie Lyons, Meridian, Idaho) calmly ranted:
$5 garage sale pantograph, or build your own.
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not out of cardboard, huh? ;)
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Reply to
Larry Jaques
I bought a very nice overhead projector for $50 used at a school sale.
Print your image on a transparency
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
I won't say what I got one for at the thrift store :O It did need a new bulb which was $15 so that almost broke a bill, although I have only seen a couple in all my visits. I used one to enlargen a spitfire wingtip to almost 6" from a 2" square from a website. You really lose the line (1/4-1/2" wide at that point) when you go that big which may or may not be a problem.
In woodworking a pantograph is used to upscale about 8x.
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On that show 'Big' they use the ol' lay out a grid and draw it in a bigger grid for the gitar. Overlay the design with a piece of translucent graph paper (or zerox onto a piece of graph paper). Figure out how much bigger it needs to be and lay out a grid that big. Then just draw each square. Not great for lots of detail.
What are you making the patterns out of?
Joel. phx
Reply to
Joel Corwith
Take it to Kinkos or most printing/copy stores, they should be able to enlarge it, either photographically or on the computer. That would probably be more accurate than a pantograph or an overhead projector.
Richard
R> Have my new Hypertherm up and running, and I'm anxious to cut some
Reply to
Richard Ferguson
I use these methods: 1) Scan drawing or photo. Using a paint program or viewer (I use PMView) re-size to whatever size you want. Print the result. Lightly spray the back of the drawing with spray adhesive and stick it on the workpiece. Follow the lines with your plasma cutter. The paper will char but so what? You can always print another. 2) For more critical stuff, I do a drawing in CAD (I use Generic CADD 6.11). I print this 1:1 and procede as above. 3) Since I got a digital camera, I sometimes use that to get an image and then procede as above.
Ink-jet and dot-matrix printers work well for this. Laser printers use heat to fuse the toner and this can cause dimentional changes in the paper. This is to be avoided for critical work.
Ted
Reply to
Ted Edwards
Thanks Ted, I had heard you can cut paper with a plasma and it won't burn the paper, but I've been skeptical. I'll try it!
Ronnie
Reply to
Ronnie Lyons, Meridian, Idaho
Glued down paper will char but I haven't had it flame. Sometimes with simple patterns that won't fall apart, I just clamp the corners. Since the paper is not in intimate contact with the metal, it will burn but not violently.
Ted
Reply to
Ted Edwards
Yep - metal is a good heat conductor - and the paper never gets hot enough. Put an insulation layer under it - e.g. rubber glue and the paper burns. And the rubber!
In the process of doing a EE mag article on the subject.
Martin
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
Please keep us posted on the status of the article. I'm sure many of us are either doing this process or will be trying it soon.
Jim
the rubber!
Reply to
Jim Meyer

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