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As a former QC tech for a US factory, one of my tasks was to inspect incoming shipments using random samples to determine if they did indeed meet specifications. The shipments came from more than 3500 miles away, with many degrees of separation. One of the things we checked was chemical content of the paint. (More specifically, we checked for certain banned compounds and elements.)
That's not idiocy. It's responsible standard operating procedure. Or at least it was, fifteen years ago.
Are you telling me that factories today aren't inspecting their parts any more?
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Apparently, the US toy distributors were not inspecting their imports too much, until somebody found lead in the paint.
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wrote:

Yes, in manufacturing, that's only logical.

Of course not. It's also not the topic of discussion in this case.

The factories, are in China. And if they're inspecting 'em, the same people putting lead paint on the toys are the ones "inspecting" for it. Mattel or whomever then imports it, obviously without checking it. Yeah, they share the blame and are the only entity we can actually legally do anything about, but the ultimate blame belongs to the people putting banned substances in the products in the first place.
We're not importing toy parts, we're importing toys, packaged and ready for the store shelf.
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As has been pointed out, the distributors should be inspecting those toys even if they're "ready for the store shelf"
You can blame the Chinese factories all you want. They deserve it. But unless I misunderstand you, it seems you want to place no blame at all on the parent companies who are taking them, without any inspection, and placing them on the store shelves.
In my factory, we shipped out many things "Ready for the shelves" and we sometimes got shipments returned because of something somebody found in an inspection. Sometimes it was our fault, sometimes it was a mistake.
My point is that those toys should have had a better final inspection from the people that bought them. Part of the blame goes to the customer. Not all, but dammit, our people got sloppy too. You're supposed to keep better tabs on your suppliers than that.
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wrote:

Yes. As I've said several times, both here and on the website I built to show how bad the problem is, productrecallwatch.com . It downloads RSS feeds from the CPSC, FDA, DOT, and several other government sources. I haven't done this week's rundown yet but, dozens of products just last week with lead paint. From China.

Yes, you are misunderstanding me horribly. I've been quite clear that the importer is the only one who we can legally do anything with and they share some of the blame. I have also been quite clear and consistent that the factories choosing to use toxins in products made for the US, are doing so intentionally and are ultimately to blame.

Mistakes are also your fault. Whose else would you pretend they are? Seems to me, the culture is "profit at any cost to the customers, and apologize if we get caught". That is disgusting, but dozens of items a week? It is hard to come to any other conclusion.

BULLSHIT. The lead shouldn't be in there in the first place. This isn't a surprise to the factories deciding to use it.

BULLSHIT.
You disgust me.
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By "mistake", I meant that the inspector misinterpreted the specifications or used the wrong set of specs.

Well, we have something in common. You disgust me too. :-)
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wrote:

That is not an excuse for using lead paint. That is not an excuse for using 1,4-butanediol (metabolizes into coma-inducing drugs if swallowed) in a childrens toy, instead of the 1,5-butanediol that was specified. A Chinese factory decided to use the cheaper chemical, despite the fact that it's not safe.
A factory in China decided to use lead paint on decorations: http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml08/08050.html
What spec do you pretend could possibly be "misinterpreted" which could lead to someone thinking putting lead paint in direct contact with food is a good idea?
It's time that the US revokes China's "most favored trade nation status". Trade _partners_ do not intentionally poison the children of their customers. Pretending it's a mistake or anything other than a consious decision based on greed and malice. Which motivation is it? Are you trying to save a few pennies, or is your primary motivation in trying, intentionally, to harm the generation of Americans which may very well go to war with China?
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Gunner wrote:

Two of the major recalls were of toys sold by Mattel. They are not a retailer and yes they bloody well _are_ supposed to act as the QA.
Several were from Toys R Us, which is not some neighborhood shop, they're a very large franchise operation with centralized purchasing and they also should bloody well be making sure that what they are selling in their stores does not violate the safety laws. Jo-Ann fabrics the same way.
Put it this way, if you bought a saw from Sears and it threw the blade at you, would you be angry at Sears or would you be angry at the Chinese because in your opinion it wasn't Sears' responsibility to perform quality control on the products they sold?

No, idiocy was Mattel failing to ensure that what was sent to them was what was ordered.
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J. Clarke wrote:

Amen. Buffoon indeed. 35 miles away or 3500 miles away. Makes no difference. Importers are responsible for QC. But as I indicated in another post, I had used the term retailer when I should have used importer.
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How so? If they're 35 miles away, they follow USA'n laws. In China, obviously, not.

NO. Manufacturers are responsible to follow the damn spec and not just apologize if caught.

Backpedal noted.
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Tanus wrote:

Not when the manufacturer is paid to do it.
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Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
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Michael A. Terrell wrote:

Yes when the manufacturer is paid to do it. Boeing is paid to provide the airlines with quality airplanes. You think the airline taking delivery just puts the plane in service without having their mechanics go over it?
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"J. Clarke" wrote:

Do you thionk that comapres to a cheap toy?
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Two? There were 30+ last week.

Yup, Jo-Ann Fabrics is another prime importer of lead-painted Chinese stuff. I blame them as well as the manufacturers.

Both. But Sears is the only entity with a USA'n presense that I could have any recourse with.

What was worse was the chairman of Mattel apologizing TO THE CHINESE for the lead paint recalls. W. T. F.
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as a man on the earth, I'm sorry for some misfortunes caused by some "Made in China". every consumer including me abhors shoddy products. so what we can do is that never consume shoddy proucts whether it "Made in China" or "Made in Moon"
AS a man in the street, I'm glad to know various comments about China which come from the rest of world. Let me know what they are thinking about China.
as a chinese ,I'm working hard to change : what i can change.
At last i hope China bring chance and benefit instead of harm to you, to me, to the world.
by the way, Merry Christmas to everyone be carefule when you consume whether it "Made in China" or "Made in Moon"
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various comments about China

As another "man on the street" (actually a dirt road in the forest), I apologise for my flippant response. Many other discussion groups that I frequent have been hit hard recently by spammers from China, and I assumed that you were one of them. I am the kind of guy who goes 35 miles into town to try to find suitable parts for projects that i am doing, and am often dismayed to find that all hardware stores carry exactly the same, poorly made product, usually from China. I end up making my own, or buying it online from a quality supplier at a higher price. I do hope that Chiunes products increase in quality. Perhaps I will then willingly buy Chinese goods.

That's the measure of a man.
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The issue is guessing what Chinese (or any) products are worth the money paid for them (I'm happy with my Sieg X3). Unfortunately, the "race to the bottom" sometimes makes it quite difficult to find a better made product when many retailers are pushing the lowest cost item to make their margins. All manufacturers are equally capable of turning out some horrendous crap.
My druthers for non-US/Canadian/UK - German/Swiss/Japanese, Czech, Polish/Taiwan, and lastly, Chinese. Bison tools are my current favorite for quality and price. A bit more precise than I really need, but this is America...
I'd prefer all CNC grade equipment for free, but that's not how things work...
Stupendous Man wrote:

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due to Fe-C phase-diagram, there must be a limit of martensite. At 850C, the martensite fraction / percentage is around 17%
with special conditions,change the heating temperature, we can obtain different volume of austenitite at high temperature. when it is cooled down to the room temperature, the steel obtained different fraction martensite.

'fluctuations in tensile strength' --- my mean is that tensile strength is not line with the temperature.
of course, lots of work need to be done to investigated other circs and the rule.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

// -------- Comment ---------------- //
What would make your data easier to conceptualize would be a graphic showing the martensite, carbide, and ferrite levels changing as the annealing temperature increases.

// ------------- Comment ---------------- //
Adding a tensile strength curve to the above graph may show the relationship between tensile strength, yield point, and the other properties.
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wrote:

Isnt the job of corporations to make money, for both the stockholders and managment?
When your competitor off shores his work, and then undercuts your prices, you have two choices. 1. Offshore your manufacturing 2. Have a big auction and go out of business.
Do you see a viable 3rd alternative?
Gunner
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