Precision hole drilling

[ ... ]
Sure. They come with a hub which will precisely clamp on the motor's rear shaft. These are the ones designed to be mounted under cover on the rear of the motor -- and some motors come with encoders of whatever resolution already built on and enclosed -- like the Heidihan sine-wave output ones which were on Iggy's motors as they came.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
Loading thread data ...
Exactly.
formatting link
I am discarding those, might sell them on ebay for $0.01 starting bid.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus3537
Actually there are laws that prevent much better if that good.
I remember when the first non-IBM color came out. It was experimental and expensive. The Treasury / FBI visited, tested it and made them tune it off just a tad to pass their test. It was technically perfect from a very high tech group of designers. It was to good.
It is the rules - must be just a little wrong.
One of the reasons we catch so many copy machine money makers.
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net "Our Republic and the Press will Rise or Fall Together": Joseph Pulitzer TSRA: Endowed; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. http://lufk> Karl Townsend wrote:
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
I don't believe it. Got any references?
Perhaps you are thinking of the color laser yellow dots forensic watermarking technique used in many color lasers. Apparently there are no US laws as such about this, but it is true that printer makers usually make their color lasers print a scattering of otherwise superfluous yellow dots that specifically identify which printer printed a page. In the main this doesn't compromise dimensional accuracy or other colors.
explains the problem and has links to a dozen other articles, with titles such as "Laser Printers Reveal Your Identity Through Dots", "Instructables.com tutorial demonstrating how to view printer dots", "EU: Printer Tracking Dots May Violate Human Rights", and "List of Printers Which Do or Do Not Display Tracking Dots".
Reply to
James Waldby
Laser printers can produce accurate and very useful images. Years ago I built a device for aligning optical read heads. It used a laser- printed pattern revolving on a drum. We *knew* the inherit limitations of paper and intended to get the final pattern photoplotted on Mylar, but the paper pattern, printed on high quality card stock was accurate enough (a couple thousands over 1" and a few thousands over 8") and had much better contrast so we ended up using it.
That was with an old Laserjet II. All bets are off with the current batch of cheap printers.
Reply to
Jim Stewart

Site Timeline

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.