Silver solder flux

My Harris stay bright silver solder flux is all dried out...
tried IPA to redisolve, no joy. Any other suggestions?
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
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Tried water ? I can't see a flux with HC solvents of any kind , my money's on water .
Reply to
Terry Coombs
The stuff in the little plastic can with screw on lid? Yes, water. Done that many times.
Reply to
Phil Kangas
Mine are in a ziploc bag because over time the plastic lid cracks and the stuff dries out . Pain in the a** to have to try to get some usable when you need it , this way it stays usable .
Reply to
Terry Coombs
For joining which metals? Regular old NoKorrode works on most stuff and is much easier to work with than the liquid acid fluxes, like Harris Stay Clean, which are only necessary when you need something more aggressive. On stainless, for example. And I've never seen that dry out - I have a bottle of All State Duzall that's old as dirt and is just fine.
For the folks about to jump on me for suggesting NoKorrode, Stay Brite is a low temp silver solder. Its melting point is lower than 95-5 lead free solder's.
Reply to
Ned Simmons
For joining which metals? Regular old NoKorrode works on most stuff and is much easier to work with than the liquid acid fluxes, like Harris Stay Clean, which are only necessary when you need something more aggressive. On stainless, for example. And I've never seen that dry out - I have a bottle of All State Duzall that's old as dirt and is just fine.
For the folks about to jump on me for suggesting NoKorrode, Stay Brite is a low temp silver solder. Its melting point is lower than 95-5 lead free solder's.
Reply to
Ned Simmons
I didn't know another fan of nocorrode existed! Great stuff, but I've never used it on silver solder.
Reply to
Tom Gardner
The best stuff for silver solder is at your jewelry making supply. My local guy sells one that is in a spray bottle, he calls it "Crystal Flux". I don't know if it is a commercial product or his home brew. But, your guy will have something similar, I bet.
Reply to
Tom Gardner
water disolved it, thanks
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
I've been using plain old borax/water for years on gold and silver.
Reply to
Gerry
"Karl Townsend" <
"Terry Coombs"
urr velkum, ay? ;>)}
Reply to
Phil Kangas
I juust keep adding a bit of water and mush it around in the container, been using the same 8oz. container of H&H" Handi Flux" for around 40 years.
Reply to
geraldrmiller
Karl asked about silver solder flux:
Karl, did you ever mention what you were soldering together?
For copper and brass (like refrigeration and plumbing), I like the fluxless (or more precisely 'self-fluxing') silver solders, like Forney's Sil-Flo (and others). Note that they are NOT coated with or containing a flux of any kind; their self-fluxing nature has to do with the metallurgy.
Even a trace of even a non-corrosive flux getting loose inside a refrigeration circuit is a bad idea. Those types of solder eliminate that chance. That they also make doing a sweat joint so easy that even beginners can do it well is a boon.
Lloyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
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I had a tiny cresent moon shape part to attach permanently to the top cover.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
Karl Townsend fired this volley in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
Well, the self-fluxers won't work on steel. They're copper-alloy specific.
Lloyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
+1 on that.
Michael Koblic, Campbell River, BC
Reply to
mkoblic

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