Small lathe ID help

Hey guys I just ran across a cute little lathe at a garage sale. Must be about a 6x15 It has some sort of logo on the headstock and tailstock, but I can't quite
make out the company name. It is an elipse about 1.25 inches long, Yellow center with a red border. In the center it says "The Right Tool For The Job" Below that it says "Michigan" In the red border is unreadable text that appears to end with "..MFG" Does this ring any bells with anyone?
I'll post a photo if I can figure out how to post to the dropbox.
Rex Burkheimer
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Rex Burkheimer wrote:

First guess would be Dunlap.
Kevin Gallimore
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I just posted photo to the dropbox. title 'Rex B small lathe.jpg'

about
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    Oh good -- Steve has already changed the spaces to underscores. (Maybe he has made that automatic now.)
    *Pulleys* to drive the leadscrew, instead of gears? You might as well write off the idea of doing any threading on that machine. :-) And the pulley on the spindle looks a bit too new to be original. And also for a wider belt than the leadscrew pulley.
    The pitch of the leadscrew looks awfully fine too, as far as I can tell from the photo. And a ballcrank on the tailstock end of the leadscrew as well.
    Is that a halfnuts lever to the left of the apron? It doesn't look right, somehow.
    No guess who made it -- but I doubt that it was recent. :-)
    Hmm ... photo from an HP PhotoSmart at 1600x1200 -- posted raw. It would have been kind to at least crop the image down a bit. It took a noticeable time to download with a T1 line. Someone with a dialup will be in serious pain. :-)
    It would have been kind to crop out the acres of brick wall above it, and the support below it, as neither were relevant to what kind of lathe it was.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Yes, it appeared to be automatic.

I have a nice Logan 9-17-B-1 at the shop, which does all that nicely. I bought this one because it was cute and cheap. I will probably restore it and put it on a shelf.

I agree. I'll either source a used one or cut a new one once I figure out what it is good for.

Yes, it is a very fine thread. Probably 20 or more TPI

Looks funky, but it works fine. Haven't tried it under a load.

It most resembles a Craftsman Companion from the 1930s, but the "label" is wrong from the illustrations I've been able to find.

I wondered about that. The image was about 300K, which is OK for my dialup at work. I originally took that photo for my own use, probably should have taken another at lower resolution for the dropbox.

Agreed, but the 4 or 5 graphics programs I have loaded don't do cropping. I need to find something simple that will do that.
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Rex Burkheimer wrote:

Try Irfanview. It is simple, small, and free. It will crop, resize, convert, and resample. http://www.irfanview.com /
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It appears to be a late 1930s Sears, although the "companion" label is not there, and another is. According to this page, the Dunlap followed it. http://www.lathes.co.uk/craftsman/page4.html It resembles the 2nd picture, plus the optional jackshaft kit.

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Burkheimer says...

This is another variant of the AA products machines.
I've seen them like this before, I owned an even more primitive machine, with a completely open headstock.
Many of the parts on this, such as the compound slide and swivel, are drop-in replacements for the 109. sears machines that AA made for them over the years.
The pulleys and belts for obtaining carriage feeds while altered by a previous owner, seem to be original. This is a refinement from the machine I had owned, which had had *no* provisions for power feeds of any kind at all.
You will find the spindle in this machine may or may not have a through hole, and it will be very flimsy. The bearings will be a single bronze bushing in the left side, and a split bronze bearing with a take-up nut on the left side.
Interesting find - it sort of connects the dots in the AA products line. As another poster said, Dunlap and AA products were somehow related, they may have even been the same company.
Jim
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