Soldered copper roof - how much solder?


I know, I know, I'm breaking some sort of tradition here by posting a question
with actual metalworking content... but diligent Googling has failed to
produce an answer to this question.
I need to repair a flat metal roof over a bay window. Replace it, actually.
Original construction used galvanized steel, 55 years ago. The steel has
rusted through, as I discovered to my dismay last week when water began
dripping into the house. Temporarily, the leaks are patched with tar. When the
weather warms up, and I can depend on a few consecutive warm dry days, I
intend to rip the whole flat roof out, replace the water-damaged wood decking
and framing, and roof it with copper as it should have been done in 1955. Pics
will be posted when the project is finished.
So, finally, I get to my question: I figure I'm going to have about 50 feet of
seams to solder. How many pounds of solder should I plan on needing to do the
job?
Reply to
Doug Miller
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Maybe someone who=92s in that business could give you a quick answer:
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left to my own devices, I'd probably just experment on a small sample and then estimate what I needed. You'll probably spend much more on the copper.
Reply to
Denis G.
A lot of the answer will involve how nice a joint you start with, how much solder you need to gob on. If all the joints are folded lap seams that are hammered flat and you are just sealing the seam, you could do the whole thing with a pound of solder. If the fit up is lousy, you could use a lot more. For the usual things I run into on these sorts of jobs I think I'd start with about pound for 20 feet.
Doug Miller wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
Doug sez: "So, finally, I get to my question: I figure I'm going to have about 50 feet of seams to solder. How many pounds of solder should I plan on needing to do the job?"
The better question would relate to heat, fux and cleanliness. If proerly pepared, surprisingly little solder is required.
Bob Swinney
I know, I know, I'm breaking some sort of tradition here by posting a question with actual metalworking content... but diligent Googling has failed to produce an answer to this question.
I need to repair a flat metal roof over a bay window. Replace it, actually. Original construction used galvanized steel, 55 years ago. The steel has rusted through, as I discovered to my dismay last week when water began dripping into the house. Temporarily, the leaks are patched with tar. When the weather warms up, and I can depend on a few consecutive warm dry days, I intend to rip the whole flat roof out, replace the water-damaged wood decking and framing, and roof it with copper as it should have been done in 1955. Pics will be posted when the project is finished.
Reply to
Robert Swinney
On Thu, 25 Feb 2010 10:22:32 -0600, the infamous "Robert Swinney" scrawled the following:
pepared, surprisingly
Don't forget flatness/closeness of the joint. Flat, close plates meld with much less solder than gapers do. Angle comes into play on a roof, too. How much will roll off with 3 degrees too much heat?
I wish he were closer. I'd love to help with that job just for the experience with copper.
-- "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it whether it exists or not, diagnosing it incorrectly, and applying the wrong remedy." -- Ernest Benn
Reply to
Larry Jaques
pepared, surprisingly
So where are ya, Larry? I'd love to have some help...
I'm in Indianapolis.
Reply to
Doug Miller
Strap sez:
"Don't forget flatness/closeness of the joint. Flat, close plates meld with much less solder than gapers do. Angle comes into play on a roof, to. How much will roll off with 3 degrees too much heat?"
All are included under "proper preparation", Bob Swinney
On Thu, 25 Feb 2010 10:22:32 -0600, the infamous "Robert Swinney" scrawled the following:
pepared, surprisingly
I wish he were closer. I'd love to help with that job just for the experience with copper.
-- "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it whether it exists or not, diagnosing it incorrectly, and applying the wrong remedy." -- Ernest Benn
Reply to
Robert Swinney
I don't know the solder answer. But, as a former (you never really lose it) volunteer fire fighter, be sure to have a hose at hand in case something gets lit up.
As a WAG, I'd start with two pounds on hand.
Reply to
Stormin Mormon

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