South Bend Lathe - trying to identify for eventual sale

Hi all,
I'm handling the estate of my late father-in-law, who has a South Bend lathe in his workshop. The lathe has no identifying markings or
serial number that I can find. I'm wondering if anyone can help me identify it from these photos: http://learningapi.com/files/ebay/lathe /
While it's quite dirty, the lathe is is good working condition and was used regularly until just recently. There's a drawer full of parts and accessories that I cannot identify (some shown in photo) as well. Does anyone have an idea of what this machine would be worth in the Boston area?
Thanks for any advice you can offer! Larry
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Pete - thanks so much for all this info! I'd been wondering about how the size was measured, and your info has been very illuminating.
Yes...you're tight about that last photo - I didn't realize it was in that batch. That is a Kwik-Way valve refacer/grinder. Definitely a separate item! Lot of the same issues with that, too, though - I have no idea if all the parts are with it, although it does appear to run smoothly.
I'll dig around and look for extra gears. There's a large drawer full of hardware with this, some of which are clearly separate (for example, a large bunch of taps), but some of which is probably part of the lathe and I didn't really look that closely.
I know local pickup will limit the price, but I've been thinking that eBay might still be the right venue, as I'd have no idea how to price it fairly and realistically if I put it on craigslist or the like. I'm just not knowledgeable enough on the particulars to know what's a good deal for this specific piece. I suppose I could just set the price at $500 and see what happens - either someone will get a great deal, or it'll go unsold, which would tell me to lower the price...
Thanks again! Larry
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David Billington wrote:

Look on the same site as above, for the South Bend Model "B" 9 inch swing lathe.
The Key feature is that it has the power cross feed, without having the quick change gear box.
The power cross feed is the star shaped knob on the front of the apron of the carriage. The pin selector lever (pull the pin, select the position, upper, lower, or middle IIRC) selects whether the lathe feeds lengthwise or crosswise, or does not feed, and the star wheel is a clutch that is turned to engage the feed and provide some slippage if the load gets too high (if it is not screwed down too tightly).
The Model A has a quick change threading gear box and power cross feed.
The Model B has change gears for threading and power cross feed.
The Model C version has change gears and no power cross feed.
There is a pretty good South Bend forum on the practical Machinist website.
Cheers Trevor Jones
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

it would help if people kenw where you were located. Someone may be close enough to take a look and help you identify everything.
According to a Whois lookup, you are posting from Harvard:
IP address: 128.103.36.76 Reverse DNS: [No reverse DNS entry per ns.harvard.edu.] Reverse DNS authenticity: [Unknown] ASN: 1742 ASN Name: HARVARD-UNIV IP range connectivity: 4 Registrar (per ASN): ARIN Country (per IP registrar): US [United States] Country Currency: USD [United States Dollars] Country IP Range: 128.102.0.0 to 128.103.255.255 Country fraud profile: Normal City (per outside source): Revere, Massachusetts Country (per outside source): US [United States] Private (internal) IP? No IP address registrar: whois.arin.net Known Proxy? No Link for WHOIS: 128.103.36.76
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Thanks to everyone for all this great info...I'm learning a lot.
Yes, Michael, I am posting from Cambridge, MA. The lathe is located in Swansea, MA.
Larry
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On Mon, 10 Mar 2008 12:53:19 -0400, "Michael A. Terrell"

Note the cleverly disguised hint to the lathe's location in the original post.
--
Ned Simmons

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Ned Simmons wrote:

Boston is a big 'area'. Just like 'Orlando area' means anything within a two hour drive, one way.
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On Mon, 10 Mar 2008 13:26:47 -0400, "Michael A. Terrell"

Boston is most definitely not "just like" Orlando.
A two hour drive from Boston will put you past 3 state capitals (NH, RI, CT), and closer to 2 others (VT, NY) than the distance back to Boston. Portland ME, Portsmouth & Manchester NH, Worcester & Springfield MA are also within 2 hrs driving distance. Two hours gets you halfway between Boston and NYC.
I can assure you that noone who lives in or around those cities considers themselves from the Boston area, at least when speaking to anyone from New England.
--
Ned Simmons

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wrote:

Depending upon the time of day, a 2-hour trip that starts in the center of Boston may only get you to the airport. <grin>
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"RAM" wrote:

That's just like Orlando, and people wondered why I liked to work second shift. ;-) Depending on the time of day, and day of the week, I am two to five and a half hours from downtown Orlando.
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wrote:

You remind me why I try to stay on this side of the Piscataqua River. <g> On the other hand, on a really good day, the fortunate Bostonian could visit Methuen, Lynn, and the highlight of the trip, Brockton, in 2 hours.
--
Ned Simmons

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I prefer to stay West of the Big Muddy - where there's air to breathe and Lebensraum. <grin>
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Make that 3 others Ned, you're forgetting our own lovely downtown Augusta. Only 60 or so miles from Portland. Should know, as I've been through it on each of the last two weekends. Once on March 1 for opening day at Liberty Tool, then again last Saturday for some stuff I forgot to buy on the first visit.
John Martin
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On Mon, 10 Mar 2008 16:49:27 -0700 (PDT), John Martin

Don't be too hard on me, John, Augusta is pretty forgettable - not even a decent place to eat. I suggest on your next trip to Liberty you get off the highway in Gardiner and have lunch at the A1 Diner. Pick the right day in the next few weeks and you may be able to convince the wife it's the next best thing to a vacation in Venice, what with the melt water swirling around the booth.
Cross the river and there's a couple ways to get to route 3 without having to see much of Augusta.
--
Ned Simmons

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wrote:

might I suggest that If your gonna get off in Gardiner, you head west on 126 towards Lewiston aroung 5 miles out you will come to a four corner. Pond Road is a right hand turn and on that corner is a little diner. Not very elegant, seats mayby 15 people but what a feed.
I thought Liberty tool was open on weekends all winter
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Diners are great, aren't they? I'll try that one some time. And Ned's A1 as well.
Liberty closes down early January until the first Saturday in March.
They had some interesting stuff this time. A great number of quality tools originally belonging to a Maurice W. Fowler. His Kennedy chests were there, with his name and "Sheet Metal Mechanic" on them. I bought some of the tools - makes you wonder who he was.
Really interesting though were the woodworking tools - they had many hundreds of new old stock James Swan chisels, gouges, turning tools, auger bits, etc. None of it newer than WW2 era, all in absolutely perfect condition, unhandled. Supposedly came out of the attic of a Boston hardware store that had been closed for years. Priced very fairly. They had a "one per kind" limit on it, because apparently some people bought some of it last Fall and put it on eBay, where it brought prices many times what Liberty was asking. They were peddling some of it on eBay themselves under their Great Wass Island name, but only a limited selection.
Anyway, it was a good break from this crazy winter.
John Martin
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Serial number is stamped at the tailstock end of the bed. Top looking down. Far right as facing the machine. Between the flat and v-way near the two screws that hold the leadscrew mount.
South Bend has or had a serial number cross reference that would determine the machine's date of manufacture.
Should be a model number name plate at the end of the bed or or along the back of the bed either end.
Good Luck Jim Vrzal Holiday,Fl.
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On Mar 10, 10:47am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Give this guy a call: http://tools4cheap.net /
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On Mon, 10 Mar 2008 07:47:42 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

thanks for the photos. that lathe is an almost complete original of my australian hercus.
if you release the friction clamp on the tailstock and slide it toward the chuck you should see the serial numbers in the flat section between the V ways at the right hand end of the lathe.
the lathe is quite dirty. get a paintbrush and a can of kerosene or mineral turps and give it a scrub up. keep the brush wet in the solvent work from the highest point downward and brush all the crud off it. then either give it a goodly spray of WD40 or give the ways a light oil. the new owner will also go over it and clean it so this is just a temporary measure that will present it better.
you have there one of the most ergonomic lathes ever made. they are just beautiful to use once you understand them. with a new 3 jaw chuck and a new 4 jaw chuck (these are quite modestly priced these days) you would find that that lathe would be quite usable.
Stealth Pilot ... who loves his 50 year old AH model Hercus.
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