static phase converter question

I am considering using a static phase converter to run a 3ph 1.5HP bench grinder and 1/2HP dust collector.
Phase a matic makes a standard and a heavy duty phase converter.
Is the standard a more robust version or are there some significant differences. Maybe the standard just has start caps and the Heavy duty also has run caps? There is about a 30 dollar price difference. thanks chuck
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The "heavy duty" version doesn't have run caps and won't give you any more power. It is designed to allow more restarts without going belly up, especially if your motor has high starting load. So once the motor is started, both the light duty and heavy duty versions will give you about 2/3's of the power you would have with real 3 phase and in your case you shouldn't need the heavy duty version.
Actually I have a used 3HP phase a matic static converter that was working great when I pulled it out to go the VFD route. If you're interested in purchasing it for a good price send an email to ptAT_NO_SPAM_PLEASEpower-tDOTcom, removing everything in CAPS and replacing it with the correct at and dot characters.
Paul T.

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Does anyone know if someone makes an adaptor so that one can use ER collets on a Lorch 10mm clockmaker's lathe?
Many Thanks
Jacko
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wrote:

No..but Ill sell you a very nice LLK Lorch.
Gunner
"At the core of liberalism is the spoiled child - miserable, as all spoiled children are, unsatisfied, demanding, ill-disciplined, despotic and useless. Liberalism is a philosphy of sniveling brats." -- P.J. O'Rourke
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    And if you're wondering what that non-sequitur was about, you posted as a follow-up to an earllier thread, changing only the "Subject: " line, not also editing out the "References: " header which would have divorced it from the original thread, and prevented it from being a similar non-sequitur.
    Your newsreader should have an option for starting an original article, which is different from a "Followup", and which would not leave the links in place in the "References: " header.
    As an example, here is a thread map as produced by my newsreader (it will probably appear distorted if you view it in a variable-pitch font, but a fixed-pitch one, such as Courier (the most common fixed-pitch one) will show it as it should be:
=====================================================================[1] static phase converter question [2] ER to Lorch?
(1)+-(1) |-(2)--(2) \-(1) ===================================================================== The numbers represent different subject lines, and the upper occurrences of them show which actual subject line goes with each number. Your request came in in the middle of the thread as the first "(2)", appearing as a response to a thread discussing a totally different topic. If your newsreader does not handle threads, you probably did not see this, but it happened, and is disconcerting to those of us to *do* use newsreaders which handle threading properly.
    As for your original question, I would have to say that I would consider most sizes of ER collets to be too large for a 10mm lathe. (Certainly the 25mm ones which my Compact-5 uses would be too large).
    Normally, the 10mm lathes use size "D" collets with a drawbar, and the spindle is already designed to handle them. (Though I have never handled a Lorch, so I don't know for sure that this is the case here.) I *have* used a Derbyshire lathe in the past.
    Good Luck,         DoN.
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    You've already gotten information posted on the difference between the standard and the heavy duty.
    My question is whether the dust collector will ever have to be started while the grinder is not running. The reason is that there is a limited range of horsepowers that these "static" converters will handle. But -- the 1.5 HP grinder, when running, can act as a rotary converter and this will start the dust collector with no problems.
    However, also note that you will lose about 33% of the load capability with these phase converters, compared to running on true three phase -- including that made from single phase with a rotary converter or a VFD (Variable Frequency Drive -- an electronic device which synthesizes the three phase from rectified input voltage which can be single phase.
    The VFD's strong point is that it allows you to tune the speed of the motor, if that will help you on the grinder. It does on a lathe or a milling machine, but I'm not sure about a grinder.
    The rotary converter can be built from a *used* (and therefore cheap) three-phase motor of somewhat higher horsepower (say 2-3 HP for this) and some means of starting (which could be the static phase converter, or some thing which you build. You ideally should then tune the rotary converter with capacitors to get the best balance of voltage and current. This won't matter for something like a bench grinder, but a well-balanced three phase yields a better surface finish with a surface grinder.
    Good Luck,         DoN.
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