steam/air whistle

I'm looking for plans for a loud steam/air whistle. I want to hook it to my
air compressor. I like to make noise.
Thanks
snipped-for-privacy@yhti.net
Reply to
just4fun
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you'll blow your ear drums.....
Reply to
jim
I made a steam chime whistle recently to use on our canal cruiser. It is based on a model steam loco one I was lent, I tripled the scale & works fine, deafening on 100 psi air, on the boat it is run off an air horn compressor around 25 psi, just loud enough on a quiate canal. you are welcome to the plans if you have autocad, or I could convert to a word doc. format or possibly a jpeg. Whistle stands about 5 inch high - obviously you could scale it. Mail me if of any interest. Cheers, Mark.
Reply to
Markgengine
Hi there just4fun, It took some finding, but see if you can get hold of a copy of the U.K. publication "Model Engineer" Vol. 188 No. 4167, April/May 2002. Page 234. One day I intend to make one, still trying to think of an easy way to get 80 to 100 psi in a car. With 2 alternators, aircon., power steering & the radiator fan I've run out of room up front, thinking of going electric with small receiver,solenoid valve, presure switch & safety valve. ALL worthwile suggestions welcome. Cheer's Ian S. in Oz.
Reply to
Ian Sutherland
On 26 Apr 2004 09:37:13 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Markgengine) brought forth from the murky depths:
Sounds like fun, Mark. Could you post them (converted, too.) to the dropbox? TIA
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Reply to
Larry Jaques
Guy Lautard's, "Machinist's Second Bedside Reader" contains plans for a replica Lunkenheimer Steam Whistle. It works fine on air. I made several out of polished brass mounted on walnut bases for gifts. Very loud on 100 psi air, but the pitch is high because of the small size. However, it can be easily be made larger.
Randy
Reply to
Randal O'Brian
snip------
One day I intend to make one, still trying
Piece of cake! Go to an auto salvage yard and buy an air compressor that GM cars have that have the ride control system. they can be had for less than US$20, especially if you remove it yourself, which takes only a few minutes. Many of the '90's have it, Buick, Oldsmobile, Cadillac, maybe even Chev and Pontiac. Ford also used something similar. I use one for the air horns in my 1 ton Dodge truck. You'll find that the GM compressors cut out at roughly 120 PSI, but by removing the head and fly cutting the surface of the block by .045" you can effectively raise the output pressure to around 180 PSI, and the compressor doesn't appear to have any trouble with the higher pressure. I run my air system up to 150 PSI. The pressure switch turns on at 135. You can buy it at RV supply houses that sell Hadley air horns and parts. It is threaded 1/8" tapered pipe. For an air tank, go to a semi salvage yard. You can find them anywhere from a few inches in diameter up to a foot in diameter, and they're usually quite reasonably priced.
Harold
Reply to
Harold & Susan Vordos
One of Guy Lautard's Bedside Readers has dimensioned plans for one in it, he also has a little on how to scale it up or down. Don't remember which of the three has it in, though, although all three books are well worth having. Enco runs these on sale occasionally, plus he has a web site you can order them from.
Stan
Reply to
Stan Schaefer
Over here lots of cars used to have "automatic load leveling systems" which used special rear shock absorbers with air bladders in them which did the requisite jacking up when you were carrying a couple of dead bodies or something else heavy in the trunk. (Some cars used greatly geared down motors to twist the fixed ends of torsion bar rear springs to achieve the same result.)
I've still got one of the old 12 volt dc single cylinder compressors from one of those air systems kicking around, you're welcome to it, but the freight would probably make you moan louder than the whistle you want to make.
Perhaps you can find something similar at a wreckers?
Even more years ago I had an vacuum powered air compressor kicking around rescued from some some automotive use It had a vacuum diapram about 6 inches in diameter which got shuttled back and forth by a toggling valve. It drove a small bore compressor piston. I can't remember what system those were used for, anyone recall?
As a kid, I bought a "wolf whistle" for my car. It was a siren like device which worked on vacuum, not compressed air. You pulled on a cable fed through a hole in the firewall to operate its valve. It was pretty darned loud too, and I never figured out why the sound didn't all get sucked into the engine.
Thanks for the memories,
Jeff
Reply to
Jeff Wisnia
I've had several requests for the whistle drawings, all will be replied to shortly. Cheers, Mark
Reply to
Markgengine
snip------
Yep, I sure do. I used one too, until I bought my '99 Dodge 1 ton with the Cummins engine. The compressor of which you speak is made, or at least sold by, Hadley. As far as I know they still offer it. They used to have an exchange program whereby you'd submit your old one when it finally decided to quit working, and they'd send another in its place for very little money. Changes in design and outrages prices on everything these days made that program short lived. I managed to get in on it once, but only once. By the way, the pressure side of the compressor is actually compound. There's a large low pressure cylinder on one side and a small high pressure cylinder on the other. They're actually a nice little compressor when they work well. Mine would build over 100 PSI pressure when new, but it slowly falls off with age until the compressor just quits working.
Harold
Reply to
Harold & Susan Vordos
'58 Pontiac Bonneville leveling.
Reply to
Andy Asberry
On 26 Apr 2004 12:35:50 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@prolynx.com (Stan Schaefer) brought forth from the murky depths:
Having just looked them up on the Web, it's the Machinist's Second Bedside Reader which has the steam whistle plans. It's too bad we can't find used copies of those for $5 like we do the Machinery's Handbook.
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Reply to
Larry Jaques
NOBODY who has Guy Lautard's 'Bedside' books is about to let them go. Regards Ken (one who has)
Reply to
Ken Davey
||I've had several requests for the whistle drawings, all will be replied to ||shortly. ||Cheers, ||Mark
Mark Please put me on your list.
burkheimer@earthlink dot net Rex in Fort Worth
Reply to
Rex B
Would you please put it in the dropbox?
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might I sugest that you convert it to a .PNG format. These are lossless (jpeg is not) and generally smaller if there aren't too many colours.
Ted
Reply to
Ted Edwards
Consider: Put the whistle assembly (two or three tone) in a dragon's head hood ornament. Power the whistle with propane from one of those plumber's torch type tanks. Install an electric igniter in the dragon's mouth. Fire breathing screech! :-)
Ted
Reply to
Ted Edwards
And might I suggest that you post it as a jpeg so that everyone can view it without problems.
Reply to
Shiver Me Timbers
Only if you consider the loss of fine detail where lines intersect -- especially at angles -- to be "without problems". Most systems have available viewers for .gif, .tif, and other lossless image formats -- including .png.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
Hi guy's, thanks for the aircompressor idea's, I'm not sure that ride levelling is used down here, but will ring car wreckers tomorrow. I drive a long wheel base F-100, so the flaming dragon sounds great. Can't imagine the cops would be impressed. BTW for people looking for something to make, I can recommend the "Turners square/cube" It's in Guy Lautard's 3rd. reader. Have fun, Ian S. Down Under.
Reply to
Ian Sutherland

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