suitable sticky flammable fluids?

what did they use in the army to fuel flamethrowers ?

Reply to
williamhenry
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Pretty sure they used just compressed air and regular gasoline. For something sticky use napalm. Nothing more than gasoline and Styrofoam mixed together.

Have fun with it. Let me know when the "film at 11" is.

Chris

Reply to
Chris

Hope he's not pissed at any of us...

Reply to
Proctologically Violated©®

if I shoot video , doesn't that automatically guarantee failure and or a Darwin award

Reply to
williamhenry

I heard that dissolving expanded polystyrene in petrol (gasoline) creates a pretty exciting mixture, but I imagine it's a bit too viscous for a flamethrower. Why not use ordinary petrol? You want something which sticks to the target better?

Chris

Reply to
Christopher Tidy

Pretty sure the US Army did not use petrol. They used gasoline in their flame throwers.

:)

Chris All in good fun.

Reply to
Chris

no I like trolls

;
Reply to
williamhenry

Yes. Petrol = English Gasoline :-D.

Chris

Reply to
Christopher Tidy

May I add, also, that napalm is a much safer substance, compared to regular gasoline. It does not flow well and burns mildly. The only trouble with it is that it is sticky and sticks to skin. As part of military training, I had napalm burn on me (I had a trenchcoat on). I was supposed to roll over and extinguish it. It was very much not a big deal. It does not burn violently.

If napalm was, instead of being spread like butter on my trenchcoat, pulverized and spread through an explosion, it would have been a very different story.

Have fun with it, although I cannot see many useful peaceful uses for napalm.

i
Reply to
Ignoramus27437

You're both wrong. They used benzine (:

Reply to
Jim Stewart

Reply to
Proctologically Violated©®

Is that the stuff in the lorries with the "Warning!Fairly Flammable!" placards on them? :-)

Cheers Trevor Jones

Reply to
trevor jones

I've never seen that. The thing I like is those peanut bags which say "Warning: May contain nuts" at the bottom.

Chris

Reply to
Christopher Tidy

Alcohol.

H
Reply to
Harold and Susan Vordos

Yeah. Real scary, eh? A bag of nuts that *may* contain nuts. Will miracles never cease? :-)

Harold

Reply to
Harold and Susan Vordos

It's alcohol in an acetate gel. Used to make it in high school chemistry class. Wino's used to get high on it - the origin of the term "squeeze" Gerry :-)} London, Canada

Reply to
Gerald Miller

CO2 and Gasoline.

There are many thickening agents, including diesel fuel. Most common IRRC is styrene.

Disolve a copious amount of packing "popcorn" in gasoline until you get the consistancy you want. Add a little diesel to add persistance.

Gunner

"Pax Americana is a philosophy. Hardly an empire. Making sure other people play nice and dont kill each other (and us) off in job lots is hardly empire building, particularly when you give them self determination under "play nice" rules.

Think of it as having your older brother knock the shit out of you for torturing the cat." Gunner

Reply to
Gunner Asch

Not to dodge your question, but your subject line indicates you are looking for a sticky substance. Suggest the alcohol gel used to start pellet stove fires. HTH Ken.

Reply to
Ken Sterling

Let the record show that Gunner Asch wrote back on Tue, 20 Sep 2005 08:30:10 GMT in rec.crafts.metalworking :

From an organic chemist I knew: be careful doing this. Styrofoam dissolving in gasoline is an exothermic reaction. (it generates heat) Most of the time, it is not a problem. But if you do it in large enough quantities, you risk a fire. So if you are doing this in "large enough quantities", use a water bath or some such to keep it cool. Unfortunately, I don't recall any specifics as to how much is "a large enough quantity" to pose a hazard. Patience is a virtue, and all that.

tschus pyotr

Reply to
pyotr filipivich

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