The Cole Drill gloat

On Mon, 18 May 2009 11:14:02 -0400, Ecnerwal


I have a similar "drill" though from your description some details are different on mine.
Mine is made very similar to a standard ratcheting pipe threading set (only smaller and much more precise). Plus I've got two holders. One has the tapered square you describe (however I've not got any bits) but the other is a #2 morse taper. On mine the jack screw is knurled for hand use instead of hex.
Use would be very similar to the way my air drills work. For a example of that see the following.
http://www.metalworking.com/DropBox/_2002_retired_files/Frame_Extension07.jpg
For the whole story go to
http://members.dslextreme.com/users/waynecook/index.htm
and look under drop box links. It's the truck frame extension about half way down.
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Yes, that's quite similar (the drill part - the mount for the drill in this fashion was percolating through my brain from the cole drill discussion, where I had been thinking more in the chain drill line before seeing that - either would work, but the plate and chain would be harder to get lined up on a particular spot.) I'll try to get some pictures of mine up.
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On Mon, 18 May 2009 10:21:23 -0400, "Wild_Bill"

I looked around not too long ago and found much the same info on the old drills that you linked to. I also remember finding someplace that still sells new ones. I pissed around for awhile trying to find it again, no joy. I could be mistaken (wouldn't be the first time :) but I'm pretty sure there is someone still making/selling this type of drill. Maybe someone else will have better luck figuring out who...
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When I looked for information about the Cole Drill a number of years ago, I saw the Guy Lautard site description, and he was selling them at the time (by special order, I guess). I don't recall seeing it for sale elsewhere, but it could've been.
He doesn't have them on his website now, this is a page that Glenn found in the Wayback Machine webarchive.org: http://web.archive.org/web/20040216050451/lautard.com/cole.htm
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WB
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On that page he mentions the electric drill adapter, and that they were simple to make. I'm assuming it replaces the handle somehow. Does anone here have one to measure/take pictures of, or can describe how it attaches...? It really does sound like a usefull addition, especially since I have a 1/2" drill that I feel I can never quite get enough down pressure when drilling bigger holes.
I suppose worse comes to worst, I could just disassemble mine and make up something. --Glenn Lyford
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On Tue, 19 May 2009 10:16:20 -0700 (PDT), Glenn Lyford

When we bought this house 25 years ago, there was no dryer vent installed. I proceeded to chain drill (22 holes) a 4+" hole through the 10" poured foundation using a 3/8" hammer drill (Skil extra tool). In order to get a little extra pressure for the larger bits, I used perforated hanger strap, a 2x2 with a nail in the end to engage the strap holes, and a screw point about 2" from the end to press on a dimple on the drill motor in line with the spindle. I did manage to keep all the magic smoke in the drill motor, but just barely. Core drills were expensive to rent at that time. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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wrote:

Sometime in the 50's I watched some millwrights drilling very large holes in a steel motor support plate. They had an electric drill with a feed screw out the back. They welded a frame from the plate up and across the back of the drill. They turned the screw out with a handwheel to bear against the frame and apply pressure to the drill. Seemed to work well but has probably been obsoleted by the mag-base drill.
Don Young
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Yeah, I overheated mine once and melted the plastic fan to the gearcase, but was able to revive it again later. I would think the advantage to using a drillmotor to drive a Cole drill is all that downfeed pressure isn't going through the motor and gearcase bearings...might make the heat a little more manegable. --Glenn Lyford
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On Tue, 19 May 2009 20:58:27 -0400, the infamous Gerald Miller

Condolences. I would have set my phaser to maximum and bored a clean hole through it in seconds.
-- No matter how cynical you are, it is impossible to keep up. --Lily Tomlin
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Larry Jaques wrote:

It sure would. Everyone in the Federation knows that 'Setting a Phaser to maximum' causes it to explode, in a few seconds. You must be a Klingon infiltrator!
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I saw the reference to the drill adapter, but I don't know exactly what the plans would have shown for making the adapter.
It could have just been a section of round stock drilled axially and tapped to match the thread at the top of the spindle (at one end), and a stem with 3 flats for the drill chuck jaws to clamp to.
When I unscrew the handle and ratchet from the top, that leaves an exposed threaded stem (which is the top end of the spindle), where the ratchet threads on and stops against a shoulder.
So, one could make a drill adapter with a threaded hole to adapt to the thread, or an adapter to engage the ratchet (threaded back on after removing the handle).
--
WB
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Thanks. That certainly explains why the ratchet isn't reversible, anyway. --Glenn
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In Lautard's 3rd Beside Reader there is mention of the drill adapter being "three sided". Perhaps there are three screws to attach any size drill to the Cole drill?
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Is the pitch known for the screw of the drill shaft?
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I'm not sure what your question means, but the spindle doesn't just thread down into the workpiece as the crank is turned. Instead, there is a separate threaded section referred to as the Pressure Screw (a hollow part around the spindle topped with a hex head) that the user can turn at will for down feed pressure, as the crank is being turned. The Pressure Screw imparts the down feed pressure to the spindle thru a thrust bearing (according to a description from Lautard's old webpage).
For drilling deep holes, since the pressure screw will reach the limit of it's descending travel, the user would need to stop drilling, back out the pressure screw, lower the upper section to a lower position on the column, then resume feeding and drilling again.
In the Cole Drill brochure (listed as Cole Drill Instructions on the Rusty Iron site www.rustyiron.com) the specifications for the pressure screw are stated as: 2 inch feed and a 10 pitch thread.
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WB
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On Tue, 19 May 2009 02:28:17 -0400, "Wild_Bill"

Damn..Ive never seen one before. Now Im going to start looking for one. Seems like I could do a bunch of things with it.
Or build one from scratch with an electric drill in it.
Gunner
"Lenin called them "useful idiots," those people living in liberal democracies who by giving moral and material support to a totalitarian ideology in effect were braiding the rope that would hang them. Why people who enjoyed freedom and prosperity worked passionately to destroy both is a fascinating question, one still with us today. Now the useful idiots can be found in the chorus of appeasement, reflexive anti-Americanism, and sentimental idealism trying to inhibit the necessary responses to another freedom-hating ideology, radical Islam"
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Gunner Asch wrote:

I'm already thinking about making one... If I'm going to have a machine shop in rural Oz in a couple years, I think it would come in right handy.
Has anyone had one apart, and can shed some light on the thrust bearing? Looking at the casting, it would appear the end of the thrust screw just bears on a shoulder on the spindle. I don't see enough room in there for any sort of rolling element bearing. Or maybe just a hardened washer between the two surfaces?
Jon
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I may receive the Cole Drill this week, and of course, taking it apart will be the first thing I'll do, just because that's what I do.
I'll report here about the thrust bearing and other parts, and possibly post some pichers 'n stuff at the kwagmire metalworking projects site.
I've seen thrust bearings that are a single row of small balls arranged in a circle, which don't require much area, although the Cole literature states that the pressure screw can exert as much as 1000 lbs pressure, so I don't know how well small balls would work. Then again, all thrust bearings don't have rolling parts, as you suggested.
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WB
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Oilite bronze works nicely (IME) for low speed applications.
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I received the Cole Drill yesterday. There is a ball bearing thrust washer between the Pressure Screw and the Spindle, allowing the pressure screw to apply downward pressure to the spindle with very little friction.
Inside the casting cavity area, the spindle shaft diameter is reduced, creating a shoulder for the thrust washer to bear against. The pressure screw section is slightly larger in diameter than the larger O.D. section of the spindle, with an axial center hole for the reduced diameter of the spindle to pass thru.
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WB
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