The Color Red - Outdoors

As near as I can tell most paints are out. 10-20 years max, and any UV exposure reduces that dramatically. A north facing wall can help but in a
shore side (not salt) environment in Arizona that isn't as much help as it might be elsewhere.
I looked at powder coat, and the best powders start to fade in 20-25 years from what I have read. That's assuming other factors have not harmed them.
Red metals aren't really "red," and they would need to be coated to prevent corrosion. Brass (gold finish) red metal is already being incorporated in the project.
Red anodized aluminum seemed to be an option, but quick checks (not exhaustive) seemed to indicate that organic pigments used in aluminum anodizing will fade. My cursory checks didn't show an inorganic red for aluminum anodizing.
I am prepared (and the person asking is prepared) to leave out the red for these reasons, but I want to make sure I have exhausted my options. No red rust isn't an option. LOL.
I'd like it to look good for the maximum remaining life span of those asking. Maybe as much as 50 years barring further life extension results in medical research.
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wrote:

Enamel on metal will work as will ceramic glazes. Takes high heat though. Eric
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On Sat, 13 Jul 2019 11:24:13 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@whidbey.com wrote:

A red Kynar coating should stand up pretty good. Not easily field applied though - -
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wrote:

Barns in New England used to be, maybe still are, painted red. The original "paint" was a mixture of skimmed milk, lime and iron oxide. It lasted pretty well.
--
cheers,

John B.
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On Saturday, July 13, 2019 at 10:37:57 AM UTC-7, Bob La Londe wrote:

I've bought steel roofing material with red (factory applied) finish that has a 40-year warranty.
<https://www.homedepot.com/p/Metal-Sales-12-ft-Classic-Rib-Steel-Roof-Panel-in-Red-2313424/204255145
Other permanent red for walls would be brick, terra-cotta tile, etc. Stained-glass, too, weathers adequately. I've got a red-glass cup somewhere, that grandmom got as a souvenir in 1895, in Atlantic City. No fading of color.
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A pottery studio owner told me that -all- their red inorganic pigments had been confiscated as hazardous. She did still have high temperature fire clay and gave me a little.
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On Sunday, July 14, 2019 at 4:30:15 AM UTC-7, Jim Wilkins wrote:

Probably that's about cadmium red; the duller ochre (Fe2O3) that gives terra cotta its color, probably is still OK.
Tiles in red are certainly available <https://www.fireclaytile.com/brick/colors/detail/catskill
Red lead (minium) and mercuric (vermilion, cinnabar) pigments aren't modern, but are also certainly a hazard.
Another heavy metal, gold, colors glass red (might make a glaze of bright red atop a dull tile background).
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When I gently brought up the chemistry of pigments it was evident she didn't know it so I didn't embarrass her with further questions. I found high temperature ceramic fiber insulation on Amazon instead. (Amazon.com product link shortened)
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