bitter taste in mouth after sanding brass?

I had to sand a brass bushing to gets its diameter down a little bit,
a few days ago. Produced a lot of fine dust. I may have been careless
and put some food item in my mouth with dirty hands. Ever since, I
have slightly bitter taste in my mouth whenever I eat literally
anything. The bitterness reminds me of the taste of oak acorns or some
such. Does it make sense to link this to brass sanding? Other than the
bitter taste, I feel fine.
i

Reply to
Ignoramus11514
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You aren't supposed to eat acorns :-). I think they're poisonous.
But I just tried putting a piece of freshly cut brass in my mouth and it didn't taste of anything. Brass isn't very reactive. Personally I doubt it's the brass. Even if it was responsible for the funny taste, I would have expected it to have cleared after a few days.
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy
Just had another thought. I remember my father (who is a dentist) saying that putting aluminium in your mouth can cause pain if you have fillings. Apparently it's some kind of galvanic effect. But aluminium is more reactive than brass, and it's also unlikely that such an effect would last for several days. It would only happen when you put food in your mouth if the food caused the metal to be released into your saliva. On the whole I think it's unlikely that the brass dust is the cause of the problem.
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy
What kind of "sandpaper" are you using? Any lubricant?
Norm
Reply to
Norm Dresner
I've had this taste from copper dust. It lasted for a few days. And my tongue felt strange. I guess you need to be more careful. I also got a slight case of metal fume fever from welding on zinc plated steel years ago. I now pay close attention to what I breathe and eat. ERS
Reply to
Eric R Snow
I had the same thing happen when I was trying to polish some red brass castings. It will go away but my castings are still unpolished. I doubt that it is good for you.
Reply to
Roger Shoaf
thanks Roger...
i
Reply to
Ignoramus11514
Not sure about that, but they are very bitter. Supposedly, if you soak them in water for several days, you can cook and eat them. Never tried that.
Could have been different if it was brass dust (not that I am asking you to try).
I hope that it is actually clearing.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus11514
It is 100% true.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus11514
Soft abrasive pads, used no lubricant.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus11514
Thanks... Will try to be careful...
i
Reply to
Ignoramus11514
Odd... I've always had a very sweet taste after making chips or filings from coper-containing stock - Particularly if I take a hit off a cigarette - Seems like something in the coper-bearing stuff interacts with the cigarette smoke, and like I just dumped a spoonful of sugar in my mouth, only without the texture. It often persists for days, particularly if I've made lots of *REALLY* small (AKA dust) copper-containing chips.
At one point earlier in my life, I tested the theory that it was something to do with copper and got what I consider pretty solid confirmation - The procedure: strip a piece of 3/12 romex, and snip off a few small pieces of nice copper wire. Roll them around the mouth for a few seconds, spit 'em out, then take a hit off a smoke. The results were impressive - As soon as I drew on the cigarette, it was exactly as if I'd taken a mouthful of corn syrup - my mouth was filled with a thick, super-sweet taste that nothing would "rinse away". The effect persisted, although gradually decreasing, for several days, seemingly being "reactivated" every time I took a drag off a butt.
Maybe the question of bitter vs sweet is an "individual chemistry" thing?
As far as health concerns, copper is one of the "trace nutrients" we need, although I imagine when you've snarfed enough to taste it, you've had the daily quota and then some for several people. Excess copper *IS* toxic to sheep - A fact that's noted on animal mineral-salt blocks.
But to humans? Dunno... I'd imagine the LD50 is up there fairly high.
Reply to
Don Bruder
Depends on the velocity it's delivered at, maybe?
Reply to
Dave Hinz
It is McMaster item 6381K525. Indeed, you are right, it is bronze. Just when should I expect to die, thanks. Just kidding.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus11514
So, you won't be needing that die grinder and those welding clamps, then? ;) (looked for the grinder last night, I now know two places where it is not. Found the clamps, though.)
Dave "Hope you don't die, Iggy, at least not anytime soon" Hinz
Reply to
Dave Hinz
maybe you are hoping that I die after I pay you, but before you send these items. :)
i
Reply to
Ignoramus11514
/me looks uncomfortable, while whistling innocently...
Reply to
Dave Hinz
Is it really brass? If it's Bronze, a more common bushing material, you may have Beryllium poisoning, depending on the material. If it is brass, it may be leaded.
Reply to
John R. Carroll
That item is CDA 932 bronze, leaded. Might be SAE 660. John, what specifically do you see about that that I haven't found yet that says to seek medical attention? He's got to know what to tell 'em to look for. All I've found so far is lead.
Reply to
Dave Hinz
John, can you elaborate a little bit, I will appreciate that.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus11514

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