Newbie : tool cleaning

The newbie's strange question of the day : How to clean the iron tools,gages, caliper, sine bar and how to prevent rust?

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Lots of wire brushes, used once and thrown away! Paste wax!
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On Thu, 11 Aug 2005 13:37:30 GMT, "Tom Gardner"

He's a newbie so he probably doesn't get your "joke" :) Randy
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Shhhhh!
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prevent
Excellent! ,-) I was deep in dictionnary to look for the differences between wire brushes wire bushes (why throw away?) and in plus it's a joke? I'm a french newbie and times are hard for me to discover all your tricks but I try ;-)
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On Thu, 11 Aug 2005 21:00:08 +0400, "Gil HASH"

He owns a wire brush factory. :-)
Wayne Cook Shamrock, TX http://members.dslextreme.com/users/waynecook/index.htm
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Ah it's clearly now ,-) More serioulsy, Tom talked about wax Have you some links about it and how to?
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Gil,
Tom was pulling your leg about "wax" also. See Harold's post re. gauges and the sizes thereof. Wax, or any superficial cleaner, etc. which can leave a residue is definitely not recommended for gauges. Anything used to clean a gauge must not leave a build-up on the active surfaces. For instance, many years ago, I used WF-40 to clean the anvils of a micromenter. Later, I noticed the "zero" of the mic had shifted 1 or 2 ten-thousands of an inch. The WD-40 had left residue on the anvils. Clean any residue off the measuring surfaces with acetone. Never use any sort of abrasive.
Bob Swinney

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Welllllll......OK, but I figure that anything needed to a tenth or so will never recover from a trip to corrosion city anyway. How about waxing a pipe wrench? I don't need too many significant digits very often so I forget they are there. For God's sake, Gill's talking sandpaper, just to keep perspective.
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Seriously, after you have cleaned your stuff, you could use any past wax, like furniture wax or car wax. You will get many valuable thoughts here.
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I use ATF ( automatic transmission fluid ) as a light oil in my shop. It has some antirust additives in it. To prevent rust I sometimes rub some wax on things and then wipe with a rag with some ATF on it. The ATF helps to get complete coverage.
Dan
Tom Gardner (nospam) wrote:

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Don't take it personally. He's just having a little fun with you. Tom runs a brush manufacturing business, and produces some excellent quality products, well endorsed by readers here on RCM.
It might help to better describe your rust conditions----particularly when you talk about gages, calipers and a sign bar. Generally rust does these items harm, rendering them to scrap. After all, what good is a gage if it isn't the proper size?
Harold
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brushes
tricks
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Hello Harold I'm really laughting of this good joke. My gauges, calipers are a little dirty but not "rusty" But I suppose I can't swipe them hardly with a sand paper For the other parts like vises, all plans of the drill press, they are both dirty and rusty I use very light sand paper (grade 400) and fater clening with kerdane (a non smelling petrol) I wipe them with a tissue and a product named "rustol" perhaps have you the same name But is it right or no?
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Tom
when
these
if
Great! Tom's a joker and likes to have fun.

For precision tools, nothing abrasive should contact them. Remember, instruments such as this are typically capable of resolving a tenth or less, in the hands of one that is experienced. Any abrasion changes their features, rendering them less than reliable. If your tools are truly *dirty*, nothing more, a good cleaning with mineral spirits (paint thinner) would probably do them no harm and should restore them to a clean condition. Dismantling them is a good idea, but don't get micrometer components mixed up should you have more than one. Do them one at a time, and wash everything well, rinsing in some clean mineral spirits. If you have compressed air at your disposal, use it to dry them completely, then use a fine oil to lubricate the threads and reassemble them. Store them in a good wooden tool box, or give them a light covering of oil when you're not using them. If your atmosphere isn't humid, you should be able to leave them in your toolbox unprotected, however. I have micrometers that were purchased back in '57 that show no signs of rusting.

both
If you find the rust is slightly heavier than will come off easily with the 400, there's nothing wrong with using a slightly coarser grade. As long as you restrict the use to non working surfaces (ways of a mill or lathe, for example), there's not a lot you can do to hurt the machines. Certainly, a hand polished surface would be preferred to a rusty one. Use a little solvent while you're sanding, so it keeps the dust down and the sanding paper clean. Cuts faster and easier, too.

the
Any of the packaged rust preventatives that don't leave a heavy residue would probably serve you well if you've having trouble keeping your tools from rusting. You might also consider keeping some desiccant packages in the box, heating them often to dry them out. Anything to avoid your tools from rusting. If you have more questions, feel free to ask. Many of us are happy to help.
Harold
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A big thanks for all your tips This newsgroup is really dedicated to metalworking fanatics ;-) There is no one like this in french, that's why I find always many answers to my newbie's questions Sometimes I must just be familiar with your "special working language" ;-) One day, a dictionnary could be written
Jean-Luc HOAREAU (JLH-Gil HASH) From Reunion island in indian ocean
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    That is because it is composed of metalworking fanatics. :-)

    How easy is it to own metalworking equipment in France? It *might* be that the lack of a similar newsgroup or mailing list reflects the difficulty of becoming a metalworking hobbyist in France. (I have read of similar difficulties in Germany.)
    Then again, I see from your .sig block that you are not *in* France, so you might not know the answer to this question.)

    And perhaps that could best be done by someone coming into the newsgroup from the basis of another language, as the special use of words to which we have become accustomed might become invisible to us, as we have *always* used them.
    I must admit that your English is much better than my Spanish. (I did not study French in school, as I did not expect to need it, and then I had to spend some time in Paris when my mother was in a hospital there. As it turned out, the times when I could not find anyone who would admit that they spoke English, I was able to find someone who spoke Spanish, so I was able to communicate -- with some difficulty.
    Best of luck,         DoN.
P.S.    I see that you are posting from a Wanadoo address, so I fear     that you could not send me e-mail directly, as I have a lot of     Wanadoo in France blocked for spamming (and for not doing much     about their users who are spamming. :-)
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In the land of Deckel, Gildemeister, Maho, Weiler, ...? No, you get the tools etc., but it's hard to find people having the same hobby/dedication and so someone willing to share the knowledge for sources of special stuff. That's why I'm here, sitting on the RCM-sofa, having a beer or two and watching the jokes & tips passing by. :-)
... and busy filtering that damned OT. :-(
Nick
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In France? Someone willing to speak something different that French? Or at least trying to understand your not so perfect french? What a joke!
Nick
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    I am sure that I would have had more trouble with a less than perfect French (which I did not have), than with my existing less than perfect Spanish. There are enough people from Spain in Paris so apparently my odds were improved. And at least the fact that I was able to speak at least *one* other language than my native English (or American if you so desire) defused some of the insularity.
    I also understand that outside of the Paris area, people are less upset by French which is less than perfect.
    The woman who was the desk clerk at the hotel at which I stayed was from Britany, and had pretty good English, and also reasonable Spanish, so sometimes a switching back and forth between the two languages enabled a conversation which we could not have had in either language alone. (And apparently, those from Brittany also suffer from the inability to speak "perfect" French -- at least according to the Parisians.).
    A nurse at the hospital (the American Hospital in Paris) spoke French and Spanish, but no English. That was sufficient.
    A taxi driver spoke both French and Spanish, but no English. Again, that was sufficient.

    In both Ecuador and El Salvador, people were *thrilled* that I would attempt Spanish, even though it was far from perfect. I had no advance warning about the trip which landed me in Paris, and the official plan for it was for me to simply change planes in Paris, until My mother wound up with a relapse on the flight from Cairo to Paris, so the hospital stay became necessary. And I doubt that I could have learned enough French even in a two week crash course (had there even been time for that) to handle my needs.
    But -- Spanish is similar enough to French (both derived from Latin), that I was sometime able to recognize a word, either spoken or printed on a sign (but seldom both for the same word) so I had a bit of help there.
    I was in regular phone conversation with my wife back in the US, and she had grown up in a French Canadian family, and had visited Paris prior to our getting together. She was able to suggest words which would help me to order food, and to recognize places were food could be purchased.
    And -- of course, the big Financial places like American Express and the travel places (e.g. TWA) would have at least one person who could speak English.
    Yes -- I would have been more comfortable if I had a working knowledge of the language, even if I were to be snubbed when I attempted to speak it, but I was able to manage.
FWIW    I had studied Spanish because I grew up in South Texas, where     there was a lot of Spanish spoken, so I had developed an ear     for it, even without knowing what was being said. As it turned     out, I also had a friend whose father was in the Diplomatic     Corps, and who had spent a lot of time in various     Spanish-speaking countries, so we were able to use Spanish     between us (including to keep my younger brother from     understanding when he would eavesdrop on a phone call). This     gave me enough practice so I was able to retain a lot of it.
    In contrast, when I took German in college, I had no one which     whom I could use it, so it has almost all faded away.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Your experience is completely different than mine. I've been quite some times been in France and they never wanted to understand me (3 years French at school + 4 weeks intensive course in Cannes/France). Maybe it has to do something with beeing a German. You can ask any German and you will always get the same answer: French are not willing to help/understand. Also, they were kind enough to steal my MX-motorcycle two days before the race. :-(
Nick
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