bitter taste in mouth after sanding brass?

What could a doctor do other than tell him to wash his paws before handling food and sending him a bill for 500 bucks for that sage advice?
Are you really gonna find a doctor that is specifically knowledgeable about exposure to trace amounts of metallic dusts? This stuff will poison you if you breathe it, or eat it, or get it in your system somehow. Spend the money on gloves,masks and safety glasses. Don't pay for a doctor's Lexus after the fact.
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daniel peterman wrote:

Dan, There are treatments to help your body eliminate these toxins. Nothing fancy but what a doctor is able to do is run the necessary tox screen to determine if there is a real problem. As for finding a knoweledgeable physician, any GP should be very aware of this sort of thing. You are not, after all, going to show up and ask him to diagnose a condition without providing a little history. You are likely to point right at the problem before he even examines you. Spending the funds to aquire safety equipment is always the best course of action. It's a little late to do that here, except to avoid future problems. I'd also think a little peace of mind might be of some value and a real doctor could also point out means of future protection for things that are encountered beyond brass. At this point, I am sorry I butted in and will keep it zipped in the future.
--
John R. Carroll
Machining Solution Software, Inc.
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Dave Hinz wrote:

My guess is it's the zinc causing the taste. Zinc salts have a very bitter and astringent taste. Copper salts have a similar taste but zinc is a much more reactive metal, most likely reacting with the acids in the mouth. As for toxicity zinc has been successfully used for years on galvanized water pipes and don't forget the zinc caps that mom used on Mason jars when canning.
Engineman
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Copper salts do that. I manufacture a number of pyrotechnic compositions that require the use of copper oxides or chlorides. I end up with the same taste (mask, or not) every time I mix.
LLoyd
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wrote:

That is interesting. The fact that you are still alive and of sound mind, is highly encouraging to me.
i
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There is an information on a medical web site that reports to copper inhalation (or its derivatives). Says that copper or powder of copper inhalation can changes tastes and led to symptoms of "metal fume fever"
Do a search on "metal fume fever" and you will see symptoms like you described.

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I'm quite surprised that a metal which seems pretty unreactive has this effect, although perhaps it is caused by one of the more reactive component metals of the bronze. Does anyone know the scientific cause of the sensation? Is it a galvanic effect, or a chemical reaction producing a bitter chemical, or some kind of poisoning? Just curious...
Hope the taste disappears soon, Iggy.
Chris
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On Sat, 1 Oct 2005 06:13:49 +0000 (UTC), Christopher Tidy

Thanks. It is still there, but to a lesser extent.
i
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