The mill has homing switches on all axes


I wired all limit switches and verified behavior of every limit switch
and every estop button.
Now both estop buttons work. Also all five limit switches work.
I have also discovered something nice: the mill actually has separate
home switches on all axis.
However, the schematic that I have, has no reference to those, it may
be an extra option on my mill that is not reflected in standard
schematic.
I understand that with homing switches, my mill could very rapidly home
itself in all three dimensions at once. Which is a plus. At the same
time, it is not an absolute necessity.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus21191
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Hook them up. You will ultimately be glad you did. Trust me.
Gunner, Machine tool service tech
One could not be a successful Leftwinger without realizing that, in contrast to the popular conception supported by newspapers and mothers of Leftwingers, a goodly number of Leftwingers are not only narrow-minded and dull, but also just stupid. Gunner Asch
Reply to
Gunner Asch
I would, but may be not right away.
Even finding out what are the wire numbers is a pain.
For some reason, at least one of them (Z axis), the only one I looked at, has three wires.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus23878
Your machine isn't that big, it shouldn't be that difficult to trace three sets of wires. Pull the cover on the home switch, clip one lead from your multimeter to one of the switch wires and then probe the various disconnected wires in the control cabinet to find the match.
Running all three wires back to the control cabinet is a good thing, it gives you the option of using either an NC or an NO configuration. Connect all the wires from each home switch to your nice DIN terminal blocks and just connect the terminals you're actually going to use on through to your I/O card.
Reply to
Pete C.
Maybe next month I will do it. I agree with you. It will home itself on all axes simultaneously, and rapidly, it is really fun. But for now I want to get the basic motion and safeties right.
The plan for tonight, is the Z axis!
i
Reply to
Ignoramus23878
You guys dont have one of these, or similar????
Everybody should have one.
Gunner, with a set in each truck and spares
One could not be a successful Leftwinger without realizing that, in contrast to the popular conception supported by newspapers and mothers of Leftwingers, a goodly number of Leftwingers are not only narrow-minded and dull, but also just stupid. Gunner Asch
Reply to
Gunner Asch
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Whoops....sorry
One could not be a successful Leftwinger without realizing that, in contrast to the popular conception supported by newspapers and mothers of Leftwingers, a goodly number of Leftwingers are not only narrow-minded and dull, but also just stupid. Gunner Asch
Reply to
Gunner Asch
I just use a cheap logic probe like this:
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For TTL (5Volt) and CMOS (12 volt) compture signals
and a cheap multimeter available at any big box tool store
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
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Construction isnt rocket science. Datacom stuff is good..probably the best for a working phone/data guy...but thats not what you need.
Its simple stuff and there isnt any reason for them to be selling for that much. The obvious chinese stuff works just as well. For 1/3rd the cost.
Gunner
One could not be a successful Leftwinger without realizing that, in contrast to the popular conception supported by newspapers and mothers of Leftwingers, a goodly number of Leftwingers are not only narrow-minded and dull, but also just stupid. Gunner Asch
Reply to
Gunner Asch
Gunner Asch on Tue, 20 Jul 2010 04:48:34 -0700 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:
Oh yeah.
If for no other reason than to dial in the table. (In my notes from a previous job, are the step by step procedure to power up and initialize an Arrow mill, which includes the setting the machine zero in all axis; without which, you're just guessing at locations.)
pyotr, machine tool user.
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
What is your definition of 'rapid'?
Next thing, when you hit the home switch, you want the once per rev marker pulse to be as close to 180 degrees away from switch closure/opening depending as possible. Mechanical switches are not very precise. If you set things up where the once per rev marker, I'll call it the Z marker since that is what I'm used to is very close to the uncertanty zone of a micro switch, you can have a axis that is off one pitch at random times.
Wes
-- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
Reply to
Wes
Max speed? Just guessing?
I think that missing it by 2.5mm is a bit of a stretch.
So realistically, could I home at 60 IPM?
Reply to
Ignoramus23878
For stage 1, no problem. Assuming EMC rapids to the home switch then backs off at a lower speed. IIRC, my rapid is 100 ipm, back off at 5 ipm, find index marker at .5 ipm. I nearly always "park" the machine on home at shutdown so homing takes maybe 15 seconds at startup. I also save part home as the back left corner of the vice - one less step to do toward making chips. You can be clamping your part in the vice as the machine finishes homing. or you can be typing in your gcode. I hate to wait on machines
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
Galil has a built in home routine for home switches that is really optimized. I did a custom home rountine off the limits for a fella, I must say it was slow and clumsy by comparison. He would have been WAY better off to install the home switches. But it does work.
Anyway, I can't answer for EMC.
Reply to
Karl Townsend

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