TiALN vs AlTiN

Ok, who can tell me which coating works better for you (in steels of
various hardness) and your application and setup. (carbide tools)
Reply to
Bob La Londe
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Ok, who can tell me which coating works better for you (in steels of various hardness) and your application and setup. (carbide tools)
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
I'm not sure what defines a real machinist anymore. To me it's a tool or prototype maker who can solve problems with the jobs I bring him.
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My friend Bill who has worked as a machinist most of his life says I'm a real machinist . His opinion is that if I do a machining job that I get paid for , that makes me a real machinist . I make no claims ...
Reply to
Snag
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Thanks. So Bob can solidly claim the title and I barely squeak into it.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
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"You can't imagine life without machine tools and the ability to make and tweak everything in your world. I mean, good God! How does ANYBODY make it though life with just the crap you can buy off the shelf at the store?"
"you keep a set of dial calipers on your desk at home"
Yep, plus 4" pocket sized ones in the car and truck.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
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"You can't imagine life without machine tools and the ability to make and tweak everything in your world. I mean, good God! How does ANYBODY make it though life with just the crap you can buy off the shelf at the store?"
"you keep a set of dial calipers on your desk at home"
Yep, plus 4" pocket sized ones in the car and truck.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Michael Yellowhair (Praxis Precision) second generation machinist from what I understand says the same thing to me. Not as many words.
So about AlTiN vs TiAlN...
Reply to
Bob La Londe
In a local motor cycle shop I used to visit regularly (bolt on parts store) called 3 Bros Cycles the owner would often struggle with customers trying to determine what diameter their handle/crash/misc bars were for bolt on crap. It drove me crazy, so one day I went through my crap tools and found an old promotional caliper which I gave the owner.
Growing up in the family businesses (one was a hardware and auto parts) we kept a caliper next to the catalog rack. Often we were able to match up a part for somebody by measuring it. In the local O'Reilly Auto Parts store they can't match up a lug bolt unless you can give the make model, year, sub year, and sub model of the CAR, "I SAID CAR YOU IDIOT" for your utility trailer to save their lives and you are a piece of shit for asking. Often I look up what I need on-line and order it even knowing they local store has a full line of the manufacturer's products because its not worth the effort of forcing them to sell it to me. I really would have liked to have it today, but...
When they ask the make I should just say Trail Right and see how long they try to search for it in the computer. Its a 2001 Trail Right zero cubic inch with the delete transmission and the straight axle.
I can't imagine going through life not knowing how to measure ANYTHING. I actually watched a guy take a hammer to a rivet on the end of a tape measure because it was loose. I just walked away shaking my head. I suppose I could have jokingly asked if he was making it into an inside or outside tape measure, but its just not funny if you have to explain it.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
So about AlTiN vs TiAlN...
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"When tested head to head, AlTiN usually outperforms TiAlN."
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AlTiN: "Performs best in high temperature applications. Requires high temperatures to form the Al2O3 surface layer."
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Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Yeah, I was hoping for some first person. I've read a lot online. Some seem to claim TiAlN is better for general steel machining, but that has not been my experience at all. AlTiN coated carbide and go hard and fast has been my experience. They have a life, but they will continue to cut even when its gets dull and the mill starts to glow.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
I can't help you there Bob . I'm still using mostly hand ground high speed steel on my lathe . I will be exploring the world of indexable tooling as soon as I finish my quick change tool post ...
Reply to
Snag
I follow a few of the "hobbyist" channels on YouTube. Many of them seem to think the smallest diamond shape inserts are the best compromise for small lathes, and lathes with flexibility/backlash/power issues. I can see the logic behind it. The smallest diamonds have the best chance of getting them into the chip breaker. Many of them still aren't breaking chips, but IMO that's a safety and cleanup issue more than a part finish issue.
Speaking of not safe... I recall a few years ago I made "bolt action" stainless steel pens for Christmas presents. Drilling the bodies was a nightmare until I gave up on the factory drill edge and ground my own. Then my best results were hard and fast deep drilling in one continues peck with giant knives of stainless shooting out of the hole. Not the safest to run or to cleanup around the machine but I drilled both halves of a dozen pen bodies without resharpening the drill again.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
Been thinking about making another batch. Recently somebody on Facebook ran across one of my old posts about them and asked about buying one. I told them what I would have to charge, and they said "if you make another batch please let me know." Actually I have been thinking about a combination tool. Regular Space Pen (tm) cartridge on the bottom, and carbide scribe on the top. Just flip the pen and lock the bolt in the other direction. I've got way to many broken 1/8 shank carbide stubs in my recycle carbide bin. LOL.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
I remember you making those and the problems you had . The tooling I bought is 5/16" shank indexable . They use a triangular insert #TCMT 090204 . Small insert , and only uses one side . I'm thinking this system will speed up some of the steel machining I do . Some of my mystery metal stock has a tendency to work harden and burn the cutter if I try to turn at too high a speed .
Reply to
Snag
Some of my best projects came from stock out of the scrap/salvage pile . My holes creek ball turner , micrometer boring head , and boring bar clamp post were all from salvaged stock .
Reply to
Snag
"You love that shop more than me."
"You don't, just plead the 5th,.... then ask them not to make you choose,.........at least two of my former GF's did, and weren't to chuffed with my answer. :D"
My buddy Garrett's girlfriend, "You treat that stupid dog better than you do me!!!"
Garrett, "You jump your warm cozy ass out of the boat and swim through freezing water to retrieve my ducks, and that might change."
(She never got the chance to compete with his work shop. LOL.)
Reply to
Bob La Londe
Yeah, I was hoping for some first person. I've read a lot online. Some seem to claim TiAlN is better for general steel machining, but that has not been my experience at all. AlTiN coated carbide and go hard and fast has been my experience. They have a life, but they will continue to cut even when its gets dull and the mill starts to glow.
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I'm not blocking anyone else from posting, maybe I'm prompting them if they disagree.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Yeah, 5/16-8mm (not enough difference (under 0.003) to make a difference). That's what they use on the mini lathes. Might be triangle they like instead of diamond. I just enjoy watching them do a lot with a little.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
I can't help you there Bob . I'm still using mostly hand ground high speed steel on my lathe . I will be exploring the world of indexable tooling as soon as I finish my quick change tool post ...
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Same here. I can keep HSS as sharp as I want and grind custom shapes, like concave edge and screw head rounders and the angle of the grooves in a serpentine belt pulley. Almost every job is different and one-off, so I don't need cutters to hold size for long.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
I'll still be using a lot of HSS , 5 holders are 5/16" , 2 are 1/4" , and the last one is dedicated for the knurling tool . I have one piece of the 5/16" cutter stock , and lots and lots of 1/4" . The carbide tooling is likely going to be reserved for tougher materials like alloy steels . I've got some stuff that I can't cut with HSS , like heat treated axle pieces . Bandsaw won't touch it , only things I can cut it with currently is the plasma or OA torch .
Reply to
Snag

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