Trailer bed painting?

I started calling around to find out if I can have my trailer bed sand
blasted and painted. I finally found someone who spoke to me for a few
minutes. He said that "sandblasting creates toxic waste" and that it
is really not worth doing it any more. (!) He said, just scrape off
whatever you can, maybe use a brush on a grinder in the privacy of
your garage, and paint over it.
The outside of the bed, basically, does not have much rust on it,
maybe one or two spots.
I have a couple of choices. One is just to keep the existing paint and
do nothing. I would, however, like to paint it grey to match the color
of my truck.
Now, if I wanted to paint over existing paint, what would you
recommend for primer and paint. Thanks.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus23017
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Geez, it's a trailer! Go find some cheap automotive acrylic enamel, and appropriate primer, and shoot it with a cheap HVLP gun. Most auto paint places will have paint that is mixed wrong on their bargain bin. It's cheap
Reply to
Rex
If utility is more important than color and gloss, don't remove sound good paint. Just clean it well with solvent, maybe scuff it up a bit with wetordry paper or Scotchbrite. A 2-part epoxy primer will give best adhesion and toughness and needs no topcoat, is available in gray and black (which could be mixed for desired shade of gray) but it is pricey stuff. Lacquer-based automotive primers are cheap and work fine on most finishes except Rust-Oleum, then follow with acrylic enamel for color. Nothing works well on or under Rust-Oleum except Rust-Oleum and even then it doesn't work very well.
Reply to
Don Foreman
Check out the spray on bed liner options as well, very durable both inside the bed and also underside for absorbing rock dings and whatnot.
Pete C.
Reply to
Pete C.
On Tue, 30 Jan 2007 10:41:56 -0600, with neither quill nor qualm, Ignoramus23017 quickly quoth:
Yeah, a candy apple red maxiflake ought to look just wunnerful on a trailer, Ig!
Reply to
Larry Jaques
I buy good quality alkyd enamel paints at yard sales for projects like this and just brush them on. It really doesn't take that long and you can get it all on without overspray and excesssive cleanup. I painted a 66 Oldsmobile station wagon with a roller once and yes, it was a little bumpy it never rusted out and was all one color.
Reply to
daniel peterman
There are so many paints and primers available, it's just a matter of choosing what's best for you in as far as safety, expense, durability and other factors.
You shouldn't sand the original military paint unless you know that it's safe to. That may be why the one sandblaster said blsting would produce toxic contamination (of his site, I assume). Sandblasting to remove paint is overkill. It consumes large amounts of electrical energy, and usually doesn't serve any useful purpose. The best use of sandblasting is to treat rusted areas, since the blasting effect is often completely neccessary for removing rust from pitted areas. The blasted area will need to be cleaned and primered immediately to protect the bare steel.
Most loose rust can be removed by scraping and wire brushing, leaving only a small amount of actual rust to be removed by sandblasting. Applying a diluted solution of phosphoric acid will help remove the rust while wire brushing. A convenient method to apply the phosphoric solution is with a trigger spray bottle.
There are additives that can be added to paints to attain good adhesion, when applying new paint over existing paint (essentially using the existing paint as a primer coat). One I remember hearing about is named Emulsibond, or something similar, used for commercial/industrial coatings. The existing paint will need to be clean before applying any coating over it, and there are many solvents specifically formulated to clean painted surfaces. These are generally referred to as prep wash, prep clean or similar term. The basic solvent used in body shops is a good grade of wax and grease remover, containg naptha and other solvents.
For more information about preparation and refinishing techniques and products, see if you can get a refinishing guide from a paint dealer or distributor, instead of asking sales/stock people at home improvement stores.
WB metalworking projects
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Reply to
Wild Bill
Actually..based on the pictures..the camo job is rather cool looking. Personally..Id keep it.
Gunner
"Liberalism is a philosophy of consolation for Western civilization as it commits suicide" - James Burnham
Reply to
Gunner
Since about yesterday, I also think that yes, I would try to pick paints that match the camo colors. I have yet to make a nice daytime picture of this completed trailer, the camo colors look really great. And the bed is nicely shaped, like a good looking 20 year old girl. If I can find a US flag pattern for spray painting, I would paint a flag on this trailer also.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus22134
Excellent! Idea.
Gunner
"Liberalism is a philosophy of consolation for Western civilization as it commits suicide" - James Burnham
Reply to
Gunner
Well, yes, except that I could not find flag patterns anywhere. You know, the templates that you stick to what you want to paint and spray them or paint with a brush. I guess it would be a set of three patterns, for blue, red and white paint or some such. I cannot paint worth a damn, so I would need a pattern.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus22134
How about a couple big decals?
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Gunner, who is looking for Gadsden flag stickers...
"Liberalism is a philosophy of consolation for Western civilization as it commits suicide" - James Burnham
Reply to
Gunner
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Gunner, do you think that they will stick to my camo paint? I would buy them, if that was the case.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus22134
These stickers work well on gloss paint not on satin or flat. I have many years experience in this field. If your finish is flat You might get them to hold on long enough that you can clear coat over them and seal down the edges but you must make sure the coating is compatible with the ink used to create the design. Usually it is a vinyl or UV ink on a vinyl substrate.
Reply to
daniel peterman
Never heard of making a template? Gee I thought you were resourceful.
The reason why most shops won't touch it is due to the high lead content in the military paint. It can be nasty stuff if you don't have the proper gear. Normally you would use a water/sand blaster. The water keeps the dust from becoming a problem. The average homeowner could use a blaster with a water mist to do the same thing.
Get the three colors of FLAT paint you need at a good body supply shop, along with a quart or so of gray primer, a couple rolls of fine line masking tape, some scuff pads and reducer and whatever you don't have already. Grab a couple rolls of masking paper (or buy a couple rolls of craft paper from Wal~Mart).
Wash and wipe down the trailer (use a good wax and grease remover where you intend to put the flags) Find a picture of a flag that you like. Buy one of those cheap enlarging projectors they sell and put the flag picture on it and aim it at your trailer. Mask the entire side of the trailer and then cut out the masking to leave ONE hole for the entire flag. Make the hole just a bit over sized so you can use one strip of tape to fill back to the outline of the flag.
Do that on both sides (or where you want the flags). Now use a scrub pad to rough up the paint over the entire flag area. Wipe it down and let it dry while you get the primer ready. Shoot the primer on so that it becomes a uniform gray color. While it is flashing off you can get the white ready to spray. About three light coats of white should do the job. Let that dry for whatever the paint your using says for masking. Once it is dry enough you can mask the RED stripes and mask off the entire star field. Shoot the red stripes. Let that dry and then you can peel and mask the star field. you MIGHT be able to find star shaped stickers to use for that at a craft store. Mask off everything but the field and shoot the blue. Then unmask the entire thing and enjoy. Now if you wanted to get fancy you could shoot the entire exterior of the trailer with clear. That would make the finish into a gloss coat, Then have the interior sprayed with bed liner.
Reply to
Steve W.
Much simpler - mask around the area you will apply the flag, and sand and gloss clearcoat(or gloss paint" the flag area before applying the flag. Gotta think OUTSIDE the box.
Reply to
clare at snyder.on.ca

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