tungsten carbide and heat

When I am making a tool bit out of tungsten carbide, do I have to keep it
cool? Does heat change it's hardness, or does this just apply to tempered
steel?
Kori
Reply to
Kori
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Considering brazed carbide exists, I don't think you have to worry about that... Just don't cool it quickly (e.g. quenching) or you'll crack it. I'd guess either going full-bore or slowly with a water-cooled stone.
Tim
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Reply to
Tim Williams
What kind of heat are you talking? Most Carbides will easily stand up to temperatures used to braze it to steel shank holders. However as with most things it won't do it any good if too much heat is applied. Gradual heating and cooling is ok. Quenching with water or compressed air may lead to cracking of carbide. If you are talking heating during grinder, you still want to avoid over heating and cooling to quickly.
Kori wrote:
Reply to
Wayne Harris
Carbide grinding should be done very wet or dry. If you have intermittent cooling thermal shock will crack it.
I have had poor luck grinding brazed carbide toolbits with silicon carbide grinding(green) wheels. They cut slow and edge is pretty rough. Diamond wheels work very well.
chuck
Reply to
Charles A. Sherwood
You don't have to keep it cool. It can glow red without suffering harm. However, a brazed-on carbide tool bit will fall apart long before it gets red, because the brazing material will melt.
Ed Huntress
Reply to
Ed Huntress
You're okay up to dark cherry, normally, unless you're using a lot of force. I sometimes have to 'unbraze' stuff, and you need a LOT of heat. Mind you, I deal with large pieces, so that's going to colour my perceptions.
Reply to
Mike Graham

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