annealed tungsten?

browsing through the local welding supply i noticed a selection of "annealed" and "unannealed" tungsten electrodes.
can anyone tell me what the difference is? i've found no reference to annealing in my books.
the 'unannealed' 10packs were labeled 'WP Pure Tungesten' (ANSI AWS A5.12-98 / ISO 6848) ... with a Lot# and ID.
the 'annealed' ones were not labeled at all.
thanks, -tony
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Tig electrodes and end mills and other cutteing tools are tungstan carbide, they have carbon in them. Light bulb filament are pure tungstan, or at least not a carbide. Les
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snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.net wrote:

TIG electrodes are not tungsten carbide. They are pure tungsten or tungsten alloyed with small amounts of Thorium, Lanthanum, Cerium, Zirconium, ...
Ted
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Looking to bow out gracefully...I may be wrong, but the "pure" electrodes are way too hard to be pure tungsten! So..indeed I assumed they were carbide, and will keep thing that untill I can find out other wise. Do you have a web page that says one way or the other? Les

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Try these sites;
http://www.tungsten.de/classification.html
http://www.diamondground.com/Tungstenmaterial.html This site has a good chart, the "green" is the pure tungsten
Richard

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It says pure tungsten is 99.5 percent tungsten, leaveing .5 percent for carbon to make carbide. I have machined a block of pure tungsten, it was not hard like an electrode. So I still think it is tungsten carbide. Les

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Get over it, it's Tungsten, pure enough.
-- David Algie

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Good attatude! is that what you would have a teacher tell our kids when the question somthing? Gee, I'm so sorry my wanting to learn somthing has you in such a bad mood. Also showing your ignorance of metals, .5 percent of carbon makes iron steel. But I bet you "got over" class.
Les

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in my original post i meant to imply the difference when it came to TIG welding. where/why would one used an annealed tungsten electrode as opposed to an unannealed one? and when i purchase tungsten for TIG welding, is it common to supply it annealed or unannealed state?
i've purchased tungsten before, but never noticed what state they were in. i suppose i'm only asking because they're available from the welding supply.
thanks again -tony
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snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.net wrote in message

A pure tungsten is essentially pure tungsten, not tungsten carbide. Tungsten wire and rod is generally drawn to size or pressed from powder, both of which give good dimentional tolerance and form a hard structure.
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On Thu, 25 Dec 2003 12:04:56 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.net wrote:

Come back when you've learned enough ferrous metallurgy to tell us _why_ you can turn iron into steel (whatever "steel" is) with just a tiny amount of carbon, but you won't do much to tungsten with that little.
-- Klein bottle for rent. Apply within.
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