Update on the capability of my hydraulic press

A while ago I posted a video of hard drive crushing. Lloyd (IIRC) said that I was overestimating the capacity of my hydrauilc press.
Here's the picture:
http://goo.gl/MHQeac
I finally got around to looking at it closely.
The ram is approximately 7 inches diameter.
The maximum pressure, developed when the motor audibly stalls, is around 1,500 PSI on the gauge.
The area of the ram is 7*7*3.14/4 = 38.5 inches.
The force is the area, multiplied by 1,500 PSI = 57,700 lbs.
This makes the press roughly a 30 ton press.
So, Lloyd was right.
That said, we built this press ourselves, using the mechanical frame with ram that I bought at auction, and a hydraulic pump we got somewhere else.
I believe that the ram is designed to be used with my higher pressures, as the hoses attached to it were 10,000 PSI hoses.
I do not want 10,000 PSI anything in my shop, however I do want maybe 5,000 PSI or at least 3,000 PSI. I will, I guess, keep looking for a more capable hydraulic unit. The plus of the unit I have now, is that it is 110v and easy to use.
i
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The piston, not the ram

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replying to Ignoramus10422 , Shalini wrote:

The piston is also referred ad tonnes in technical. Based on the work the piston size will be varied so it gives customization in hydraulic presses
click to open the full size version of the image
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Many years ago I worked in a cotton gin as a front press operators. The ginner warned us to keep an eye on hydraulic pressures, and if anything didn't look right or we heard a sizzling hiss don't move until you know why. He claimed a pin hole on a high pressure line could cut you like a high power laser. He claimed to have seen a guys arm half severed from a leak once. I am thinking we were running about 4000-5000 on the main press rams. Those lines were down in the pit below the bale press, but still. I kind of believe him about the damage hydraulics can do having seen a guy cut a wood pallet in half with a gas powered pressure washer once at much wider dispersement and much lower pressures than that.
I wouldn't want 10,000 psi lines in my shop either.
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Maybe it cannot cut a hand in half, but hydraulic oil kills tissue around it, leading to loss of limb.
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wrote:

In 1980 I worked on a device for injecting brine into fish fillets. The prototype consisted of a plate with an array of 1/8 diameter hypodermic type needles. Each needle had two .008" diameter holes drilled 90 degrees to the long axis of the needle close to the tip. I made the needles and it was the first time I had ever drilled a hole that small. There was an intensifier pump that caused to brine to leave the needles at very high pressure. When the firing button was pushed the brine would form a little cloud a few inches from the needle. When demonstrating the protptype for the first time to the customer he was dubious that the brine would really be injected very far. Thenn he noticed that one of the little clouds wasn't forming to one side of a particular needle. He put his finger over the other hole and before we could stop him pressed the firing button. He thought that stopping the hole would force the brine out of the clogged hole. Instead the brine was forced through his fingertip and nail. Jerking his finger back caused his finger to be cut. He was then convinced that the brine would indeed be injected deep into the fish. Eric
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And what happened to him, did he go to hospital?
i
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On Fri, 21 Mar 2014 18:50:11 -0500, Ignoramus23598

His finger had a slice that started about 1/4 inch from the tip of his finger and of course went all the way to the end. The cut was pretty clean, similar to a cut with a pretty sharp knife. He wrapped a red rag around it after we all got a quick look. Then after a few minutes he washed it a little and used one of the shop's first aid kits to wrap some gauze and adhesive tape around it. It was bleeding pretty good before he wrapped the rag around it. But after the incident he stuck around a while and discussed the machine with the engineer. I do not know if he ever got stiches. We were only pumping a salt water solution through the machine so the wound was pretty clean, there were no oil or solvents present in the system. I'm sure the solution we were pumping wasn't real sterile though but then the wound did bleed pretty good, which tends to wash out stuff. Eric
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Here's my 30 ton shop built press. I had design help here on RCM back in 2012 when I built it.
http://www.mwdropbox.com/dropbox/shop_press.jpg
It uses a standard Enerpac 10,000 psi spring return cylinder with a standard air over hydraulic pump.
I use the same 10,000 psi pump on my 30 ton enerpac puller
http://www.mwdropbox.com/dropbox/Puller01.jpg
ANYWAY, 10,000 psi is fine with proper equipment.
Karl
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On 3/21/2014 7:02 AM, Karl Townsend wrote:

I suspect that your setup is safer in that a leak & small loss of volume will result in a dramatic drop in pressure. Whereas a motor driven hydraulic pump will be able to supply a much larger volume loss before dropping much in pressure.
Bob
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Looks very nice.
i
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    I've got a 120 VAC pump designed to operate crimper heads for AMP (now TECO) terminal crimpers. While it uses the 10,000 PSI couplers that Enerpac supplies, the pump has a limit switch to stop the pressure at 8600 PSI (IIRC) -- probably to provide a known pressure to the crimp heads. I also have a foot operated pump with the same fittings, also provided by AMP for the same crimper heads. The choice of which to use is based on whether AC power is handy. :-) The foot pump is not that slow, and works well up to 4-0 terminal crimps with the right dies.
    And yes -- I have the crimping heads and dies for 8 AWG through 2 AWG (one crimper head with multiple dies), and for 1-0 through 4-0 (with a second larger crimper head and multiple dies). I first encountered one of these (foot pump, with head and dies for 4-0 at a company which I once worked for, and which now no longer exists.) But seeing that made me recognize the function of the electric pump when I got it at a surplus sale, and then I got dies and heads via eBay over a period of a few years.
    Anyway -- with the foot pump and proper Enerpac hoses and couplings, I don't worry about leaks at the 8600 PSI. With the electric one, it could be more of a problem before the leak was discovered.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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You could add a 2-way valve and a manual pump to boost the pressure after the motorized unit has taken up all the slack. At the minimum a check valve in the powered pump's discharge would isolate it from the higher manual pressure.
A fully manual 50 ton press isn't impossibly slow to operate.
I bought extra Porta-Power couplers to use the hand pump in several places. http://www.toolcentral.com/ecommerce.php/mode/view/cat/298/mfr/1201/product/25998
jsw
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